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ABOUT THE FQXi PODCAST

The FQXi podcast brings you the latest ideas in foundational physics and cosmology—and includes interviews with our members and other leading scientists. It's hosted by Zeeya Merali and Brendan Foster. You can contact us at podcast@fqxi.org, and follow us on twitter: @FQXi. The podcast is produced by Zeeya, and music is provided by Baltimore-based Diefenbaker.
RECENT FORUM POSTS

Georgina Woodward: "Be careful, there are many people who are not who they pretend to be." in Global Collaboration

Georgina Woodward: "The preceding explanation of wavefunction collapse is, I think,..." in Consciousness and the...

jim hughes: "I'm not a mathematician. So what I see here is some smart people who..." in Consciousness and the...

Steve Dufourny: "Hello FQXi, the members and all, I try to do my best to unite and convice..." in Global Collaboration

Georgina Woodward: "Broken machine: What do[es] I see next? The I that was, E.I, has not been..." in The Room in the Elephant:...

Lorraine Ford: "Hi Stefan, I hope that a good leader, and a good political party, is..." in The Present State of...

Lorraine Ford: "We live in an age of computing. But physics, mathematics and philosophy,..." in The Present State of...

Georgina Woodward: "I've copied the comment to the thread where it belongs. This orphan can be..." in The Room in the Elephant:...


RECENT ARTICLES
click titles to read articles

Good Vibrations
Microbead 'motor' exploits natural fluctuations for power.

Reconstructing Physics
New photon experiment gives new meta-framework, 'constructor theory,' a boost.

The Quantum Engineer: Q&A with Alexia Auffèves
Experiments seek to use quantum observations as fuel to power mini motors.

The Quantum Clock-Maker Investigating COVID-19, Causality, and the Trouble with AI
Sally Shrapnel, a quantum physicist and medical practitioner, on her experiments into cause-and-effect that could help us understand time’s arrow—and build better healthcare algorithms.

Connect the Quantum Dots for a New Kind of Fuel
'Artificial atoms' allow physicists to manipulate individual electrons—and could help to reduce energy wastage in electronic devices.



PODCAST
September 29, 2021

Complete Podcast
 
The FQXi November 9, 2015 Podcast features:
  • FQXi Grant & Neutrino Prizes
  • A Cosmic Test for Time
  • Existential Risk
  • Thunderbirds Meets Quantum Physics
INFO: MP3 file / 41 minutes / 40 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
DISCUSS in the FQXi Community Forum
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Featured video in this podcast:
Individual Stories
FQXi Grant & Neutrino Prizes
In this week's news round-up, Zeeya & Brendan discuss the launch of FQXi's $2million grant round, Physics of the Observer, & the Nobel and Breakthrough Prizes in Physics for the discovery of neutrino oscillations--with help from astrophysicist Katie Mack.
INFO: MP3 file / 10 minutes / 10 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
A Cosmic Test for Time
A solar-system-sized experiment to test the nature of time: is time malleable, as general relativity suggests, or uncertain, as quantum mechanics asserts? SETI scientist Laurance Doyle describes his plans to bounce radar from the moons of Jupiter to reporter John Farrell.
INFO: MP3 file / 11 minutes / 11 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
Existential Risk
Nick Bostrom of the Future of Humanity Institute assesses the risks of a global catastrophe that could wipe out life, either from natural or human-induced environmental disasters or machine intelligence, synthetic biology, or nanotechnology that has got out of hand. With reporter Carinne Piekema.
INFO: MP3 file / 14 minutes / 14 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
Thunderbirds Meets Quantum Physics
Particle physicist Ben Still chats about his beginner's guide to understanding the subatomic world -- as told by Brains, of the 1960s science fiction series Thunderbirds -- with reporter Sophie Hebden.
INFO: MP3 file / 5 minutes / 5 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
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Recent Comments


Yes : ), I have never tried the computer screen thing but I will take your word for it.


Steve and Georgina,

Colors, like "red", cannot be measured at all; they are purely subjective responses to the objective properties of light. The best that we can do is measure properties like amplitudes and frequencies, and then deduce, rather than measure, that a normal human visual system, will produce the perception of the color, in response to those objective properties.

The difference is important. When you see the color yellow, on your computer screen, you are not "seeing"...


Pentcho,

RE: "The Pound-Rebka experiment is compatible with Newton's emission theory of light", and "in general relativity, the speed of light falling towards the source of gravity idiotically DECREASES (in the gravitational field of the Earth the acceleration of falling photons is NEGATIVE, -2g)"

Have you actually read the paper? If you have not go to the second to the last paragraph and study the Plus and Minus signage before talking of compatibility or not with...

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