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Contest Partners: Fetzer Franklin Fund, and The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation

Previous Contests

Undecidability, Uncomputability, and Unpredictability Essay Contest
December 24, 2019 - April 24, 2020
Contest Partners: Fetzer Franklin Fund, and The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation
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What Is “Fundamental”
October 28, 2017 to January 22, 2018
Sponsored by the Fetzer Franklin Fund and The Peter & Patricia Gruber Foundation
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Wandering Towards a Goal
How can mindless mathematical laws give rise to aims and intention?
December 2, 2016 to March 3, 2017
Contest Partner: The Peter and Patricia Gruber Fund.
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Trick or Truth: The Mysterious Connection Between Physics and Mathematics
Contest Partners: Nanotronics Imaging, The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, and The John Templeton Foundation
Media Partner: Scientific American

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How Should Humanity Steer the Future?
January 9, 2014 - August 31, 2014
Contest Partners: Jaan Tallinn, The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, The John Templeton Foundation, and Scientific American
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It From Bit or Bit From It
March 25 - June 28, 2013
Contest Partners: The Gruber Foundation, J. Templeton Foundation, and Scientific American
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Questioning the Foundations
Which of Our Basic Physical Assumptions Are Wrong?
May 24 - August 31, 2012
Contest Partners: The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, SubMeta, and Scientific American
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Is Reality Digital or Analog?
November 2010 - February 2011
Contest Partners: The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation and Scientific American
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What's Ultimately Possible in Physics?
May - October 2009
Contest Partners: Astrid and Bruce McWilliams
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The Nature of Time
August - December 2008
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RECENT POSTS IN THIS TOPIC

Vladimir Fedorov: on 5/16/20 at 10:00am UTC, wrote Dear Heinz Glad to read your work again. I greatly appreciated your work...

Michael muteru: on 4/30/20 at 9:40am UTC, wrote category mistake maybe a description of ourmodels of describing reality...

Vladimir Rogozhin: on 4/19/20 at 13:55pm UTC, wrote Hello Heinz Yes, one must dig into the etymology of many languages well in...

H.H.J. Luediger: on 4/18/20 at 20:07pm UTC, wrote Dear Vladimir thanks for your benevolent review and rating of my essay!...

Vladimir Rogozhin: on 4/18/20 at 14:02pm UTC, wrote Dear Heinz You have presented a very deep analytical and philosophical...

Israel Perez: on 4/10/20 at 4:04am UTC, wrote Dear Heinz Short essay but a lot of well-written philosophical...

H.H.J. Luediger: on 4/7/20 at 10:50am UTC, wrote Dear Edwin Eugene Klingman, all you say above is at least somehow...

Edwin Klingman: on 4/5/20 at 1:00am UTC, wrote Heinz, Having re-read your essay, I now better understand your comment. ...


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FQXi FORUM
September 19, 2021

CATEGORY: Undecidability, Uncomputability, and Unpredictability Essay Contest (2019-2020) [back]
TOPIC: Category Mistakes and Time Traps by H.H.J. Luediger [refresh]
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Author H.H.J. Luediger wrote on Feb. 10, 2020 @ 12:40 GMT
Essay Abstract

From a formal point of view many so called unsolvable problems can be traced back to a common source, namely the category mistake, that is, the turning of an answer into a scientific question. A category mistake is committed, when categories are affirmatively associated beyond their virtual connectedness, i.e. when their sacrosanct borders are made the subject of scientific investigation. The result of doing so, I shall argue, is Time.

Author Bio

H.H.J. Luediger holds a degree in telecommunication science. His interests include the theories of language and science with emphasis on 'space' and 'time'.

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Author H.H.J. Luediger wrote on Feb. 21, 2020 @ 12:33 GMT
Addendum: I've been wondering whether, in case Kepler and Newton had never been born, we would have agreed on whether the universe is Ptolemaic or Coperincan. I doubt that this question would have been resolved, because both 'theories' were, despite the genius-stroke of Copernicus, mere empirical narratives supplemented by complex algorithmic mathematics. Much of today's discussion in theoretical physics is in a much worse position; there are not even empirical narratives - just overhyped forward-looking-statements and artist's views of the day before the Big Bang.

The difference classical mechanics made was that it brought 'motion' from the heavens down to earth by resolving the millennia-old problem of motion. And everyone equipped with a yardstick and a clock was invited to prove it wrong or turn it into business. Today's theoretical physics has withdrawn to beyond the seven mathematical mountains, where the original ideas of physics have long drowned in the too-big-to-fail of LHCs, LIGOs, computational brains, etc. pp. However, as one contestant conspicuously phrased it: "who knows what else it [the math] might be good for?"... One is tempted to think (with Shakespeare): Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.

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Philip Gibbs replied on Feb. 23, 2020 @ 12:29 GMT
Your essay makes a very thought-provoking and philosophical read. You question many assumptions as category errors, and you may be right. Your conclusion is Philosophical presentism, only the present is real.

I think this is certainly a defensible position. Why do we need to think of the past as real when all we know about it are our memories and deductions in the "fossil" record that exist in our present knowledge of information, and as for the future, it has not happened yet? All we know of what is to come is uncertain predictions that we can make with our present information. If our experience is everything then it is formed from only the information that we possess now.

If we accept this presentism then what should we say about places that are far away? Do they also not matter because it is only the information we have now that matters to our experience? Information transfer is limited by the speed of light so if time is stationary then we have no real access to places beyond our own mind.

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Author H.H.J. Luediger replied on Feb. 24, 2020 @ 10:54 GMT
Dear Philip,

Presentism (at least usually) includes acceptance that the past has existed and that the future will exist. Hence presentism is not per se objecting Time, it just holds that only the present is real. So, what I fundamentally deny is Time as such, i.e. that there is anything like Becoming or change (which Aristotle against Parmenides unfortunately associated with Time). And if...

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Member Noson S. Yanofsky wrote on Mar. 6, 2020 @ 22:09 GMT
Hi,

Thank you for commenting on my essay. I am not sure I understand all of your essay. In my essay I talk of mistakes in understanding objects within

infinitesimal time slices ("Now").

All the best,

Noson Yanofsky

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Author H.H.J. Luediger replied on Mar. 7, 2020 @ 11:39 GMT
Noson,

'Theseus Ship' is the subject of psychology and thus asking questions that have no answers. Basically it clearly demonstrates that 'things' have no existence in 'time'. This is the quintessence of my essay, namely, that the world exists in time-less knowledge and nowhere else.

Heinz

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Georgina Woodward wrote on Mar. 7, 2020 @ 23:47 GMT
Hi Heinz, I have read through your essay several times. It is densely packed with ideas and I found it difficult to grasp all that you wished to convey. your reply to Noson ". This is the quintessence of my essay, namely, that the world exists in time-less knowledge and nowhere else." is helpful.

You start by using what you call metaphor and claim there is category error in that. Your...

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Edwin Eugene Klingman wrote on Apr. 5, 2020 @ 01:00 GMT
Heinz,

Having re-read your essay, I now better understand your comment.

You conclude your essay: “The only reality there is, is a timeless present.”

I won’t say that you are wrong. Back in the day I got very excited about Marshall McLuhan, Hayakawa, and languages. I certainly like your relation of Absolute non-contradiction to orthogonality.

But, aside from cocktail conversation, I’m not sure where one goes with this. Using metaphor, it’s as if your universe is somewhere between the all encompassing connectedness of a cross between an LSD experience and solipsism.

I’m all for both, but on normal days I have numerous 747’s fly over my ranch on the VOR radial descending into SFO, and I don’t think that happens under LSD or designed by solipsists.

My essay pushes (3+1)D-ontology, also called presentism, and it is a functional model that approximates the reality you describe, but far more useful, in my opinion, than going overboard about the reality of time. I do thing category errors are worthwhile indicators of heretofore unseen error, and I believe you have applied it well toward QM, but I’m not sure categories are good for much else.

My two cents.

Thanks again for reading my essay and commenting. I did enjoy your essay.

Edwin Eugene Klingman

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Author H.H.J. Luediger wrote on Apr. 7, 2020 @ 10:50 GMT
Dear Edwin Eugene Klingman,

all you say above is at least somehow arguable, except one thing, namely that my ideas "are the all encompassing connectedness of a cross between an LSD experience and solipsism". And I would even be prepared to argue for solipsism - but not the LSD thing.

LSD leads to the fusion of categories (objects, forms, colors, sounds, odors...etc.) and thus destroys the 'world' as we know it by dissolving the metaphors that allow us to recognize and verbally combine these categories. LSD is a speech-killer, what it leaves behind is chaotic sensations! And this is precisely what happens in pseudo-science: the a posteriori 'empirical' connection of things which have a priori been taken apart - post-modernity in its purest form. Hence my swipe on artists in the introduction of my essay.

Thanks for the parole, otherwise this brilliant analogy would have never crossed my mind!

Heinz Luediger

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Israel Perez wrote on Apr. 10, 2020 @ 04:04 GMT
Dear Heinz

Short essay but a lot of well-written philosophical reflections. It seems that you have a great background on philosophical matters. Although I have studied some philosophy, it is formally not my field, so I have no criticisms on your work.

Good luck in the contest!

Israel

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Vladimir Rogozhin wrote on Apr. 18, 2020 @ 14:02 GMT
Dear Heinz

You have presented a very deep analytical and philosophical essay with important conclusions for the scientific community ... I think that Pavel Florensky is right: “We repeat: worldunderstanding is spaceunderstanding”. Fundamental science "rested" in the understanding of matter, understanding of space. The result is an understanding of the phenomenon of time and...

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Author H.H.J. Luediger replied on Apr. 18, 2020 @ 20:07 GMT
Dear Vladimir

thanks for your benevolent review and rating of my essay! The tempus forms in ancient languages (e.g. Greek of the classical period) were not only inferior to aspect and Aktionsart, but just related the narration relativ to its content. Only the modern concept of there being universal time (and hence universal history) led to the association of grammatical tempus with TIME. So, yes, space is the dimension in which understanding (note the '...standing') takes place.

I will read your essay and comment it.

Heinz

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Vladimir Rogozhin replied on Apr. 19, 2020 @ 13:55 GMT
Hello Heinz

Yes, one must dig into the etymology of many languages well in the categories of “space” and “time” in order to get to the bottom of their nature ... The mystery of time → in the mystery of rhythm. The mystery of rhythm → in the mystery of space. The mystery of space → in the mystery of matter. The mystery of matter → in the mystery of the "Logos". The mystery of the "Logos" → in the mystery of the dialectic of the "coincidence of opposites", the absolute forms of the existence of matter: absolute rest and absolute motion. The mystery of the dialectic of the absolute rest and absolute motion → in the mystery of the primordial generating structure. The mystery of the primordial generating structure → in the mystery of the ontological (cosmic, structural) memory →... Big stop for thinking. Finding the way → ...

I look forward to your questions and critical comments of my ideas on my forum.

Vladimir

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Michael muteru wrote on Apr. 30, 2020 @ 09:40 GMT
category mistake maybe a description of ourmodels of describing reality .very true. I was musing on How these inherent problems may be a product of human bias. old read my take here https://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/3525.all the best

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Vladimir Nikolaevich Fedorov wrote on May. 16, 2020 @ 10:00 GMT
Dear Heinz

Glad to read your work again.

I greatly appreciated your work and discussion. I am very glad that you are not thinking in abstract patterns.

"Today's theoretical physics has withdrawn to beyond the seven mathematical mountains, where the original ideas of physics have long drowned in the too-big-to-fail of LHCs, LIGOs, computational brains, etc. pp."

While the discussion lasted, I wrote an article: “Practical guidance on calculating resonant frequencies at four levels of diagnosis and inactivation of COVID-19 coronavirus”, due to the high relevance of this topic. The work is based on the practical solution of problems in quantum mechanics, presented in the essay FQXi 2019-2020 “Universal quantum laws of the universe to solve the problems of unsolvability, computability and unpredictability”.

I hope that my modest results of work will provide you with information for thought.

Warm Regards, `

Vladimir

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