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RECENT POSTS IN THIS TOPIC

Vladimir Fedorov: on 2/27/18 at 5:24am UTC, wrote Dear Richard, I highly appreciate your well-written essay in an effort to...

Peter Jackson: on 2/23/18 at 17:25pm UTC, wrote Richard, I enjoyed your essay, hitting many fundamental points. 2...

Steven Andresen: on 2/22/18 at 9:04am UTC, wrote Dear Richard If you are looking for another essay to read and rate in the...

Satyavarapu Gupta: on 2/5/18 at 23:19pm UTC, wrote Dear Richard L Marker, You wrote a really wonderful essay with fine words...

thomas cuny: on 2/5/18 at 20:23pm UTC, wrote The universe is a single background free dynamic spin structure.

Richard Marker: on 2/2/18 at 21:31pm UTC, wrote Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta, Thank you for your feedback. This is...

Satyavarapu Gupta: on 2/2/18 at 21:21pm UTC, wrote Hi Richard L Marker Very nice thinking “Theories help predict and...

Nainan Varghese: on 1/31/18 at 8:45am UTC, wrote Dear Marker, Thanks for your essay. You described most fundamental entity...


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FQXi FORUM
October 17, 2019

CATEGORY: FQXi Essay Contest - Spring, 2017 [back]
TOPIC: Finding the Most Simple by Richard L Marker [refresh]
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Author Richard L Marker wrote on Jan. 23, 2018 @ 19:56 GMT
Essay Abstract

Discovery of the most fundamental level in physics may require the joint efforts of physicists and philosophers. Theories help predict and organize our understanding of physics, but often they add new attributes that result in widening our concepts. Physics needs a narrowing of concepts to a single entity. This paper explores how to achieve a narrowing of the concepts.

Author Bio

Richard Marker lives in Mount Vernon, Washington, USA. He is an active retiree who spent most of his life thinking about how Nature could have built our universe from the simplest of entities. His formal education includes undergraduate degrees in physics and mathematics, and achieving Fellowship in the Society of Actuaries.

Download Essay PDF File

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Jonathan J. Dickau wrote on Jan. 27, 2018 @ 00:14 GMT
It's good to see you here Richard...

I enjoyed your essay greatly, and I think you addressed the essay question posed by FQXi squarely; so I give you credit for that. I also enjoyed the breakdown of levels and the final conclusion that we need to find something featureless, and to study nothing, if we want to truly understand what is fundamental. I can't give you full credit for incorporating all the technical details that would give your essay appeal to scientists, but you have given the rest of us a clear route to progress - which is essential for Science to advance.

I attended a lecture back in 2009 by Gerard 't Hooft where he stated that many of the advances we hope to make in Physics will never come unless there can be cooperation and collaboration that goes beyond the borders of specialization. He said some problems will need not only a comparison among people from different branches of Physics, but also collaboration with people in various areas of Math, engineers and technologists, and computer programmers, but also philosophers. You can't get 'out of the box' thinking from those trained to work inside it, and only someone outside the information silo can see that.

All the Best,

Jonathan

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Author Richard L Marker replied on Jan. 27, 2018 @ 02:57 GMT
Jonathan,

Thank you for your kind words. My presentation does not come close to the great job you did in your discussion of symmetry and gravity.

In the many years since we last had contact I have thought of you on a number of occasions. I always enjoyed our exchanges. Even this many years later, I feel badly that I could not do the paper that I had agreed to do. It wasn't a...

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Jonathan J. Dickau replied on Jan. 29, 2018 @ 16:00 GMT
Thanks Richard,

I appreciate the insight into your further wanderings. As for myself; I wrote several FQXi essays trying to be thematic, before attempting to work my own pet theories into the writing. Additionally; I found a way to get into and attend a few Physics conferences, to give myself a reason to collate and tighten my ideas so that I could make a poster or create slides to give a talk, and to get an idea of what other people were presenting - including the range of technical detail that would fly.

Luckily; I discovered that it was very beneficial to see how top scientists dealt with the issues of how to present complex ideas to an audience of people who might be learned, but are not trained in your specialty. The FFP conference series has been especially rich in this area; to see experts at QM talking to condensed matter folks, particle physics experts talking to cosmologists, and so on, is very helpful. This way you are getting the message straight from someone who knows all the technical details, but in a way intended to be more easily accessible or digestible.

Someone gave me a Skype camera for Christmas... So we'll see.

All the Best,

Jonathan

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Author Richard L Marker replied on Jan. 29, 2018 @ 16:12 GMT
Jonathan,

I suggest we continue this offline. My email is: rlmarker@spaceandmatter.org.

BTW, Someone suggested Zoom to me as preferable to Skype. It seems better, but I haven't tried it in real time yet.

Richard

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Nainan K. Varghese wrote on Jan. 31, 2018 @ 08:45 GMT
Dear Marker,

Thanks for your essay. You described most fundamental entity very well. I fully agree with your views. An alternative concept, I proposed, treats substance as the most fundamental and calls it ‘matter’. Pure (unstructured) matter has no properties except its ability to exist. Different characteristic properties of diverse objects are the result of their structures by matter-particles. Whole of this concept is based on a single assumption that ‘substance is fundamental and matter alone provides substance to all real entities’. This concept can provide logical explanations to all physical phenomena in all groups as classified by you.

Best regards,

Nainan

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Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta wrote on Feb. 2, 2018 @ 21:21 GMT
Hi Richard L Marker

Very nice thinking “Theories help predict and organize our understanding of physics, but often they add new attributes that result in widening our concepts. Physics needs a narrowing of concepts to a single entity.”, Here I must say that though Dynamic Universe model is a recent theory, it did not introduce any new concept, and left many of the present day concepts...

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Author Richard L Marker replied on Feb. 2, 2018 @ 21:31 GMT
Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta,

Thank you for your feedback. This is a hastily made summary of some of the first steps in understanding how nature works at the most fundamental level. I understand there are many claims made in this area so I carefully avoided mention of any in my essay.

Good luck on your endeavors.

Richard Marker

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thomas cuny wrote on Feb. 5, 2018 @ 20:23 GMT
The universe is a single background free dynamic spin structure.

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Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta wrote on Feb. 5, 2018 @ 23:19 GMT
Dear Richard L Marker,

You wrote a really wonderful essay with fine words in Abstract like..."Discovery of the most fundamental level in physics may require the joint efforts of physicists and philosophers. Theories help predict and organize our understanding of physics, but often they add new attributes that result in widening our concepts." These words are exactly correct...

Here...

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Steven Andresen wrote on Feb. 22, 2018 @ 09:04 GMT
Dear Richard

If you are looking for another essay to read and rate in the final days of the contest, will you consider mine please? I read all essays from those who comment on my page, and if I cant rate an essay highly, then I don’t rate them at all. Infact I haven’t issued a rating lower that ten. So you have nothing to lose by having me read your essay, and everything to...

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Peter Jackson wrote on Feb. 23, 2018 @ 17:25 GMT
Richard,

I enjoyed your essay, hitting many fundamental points. 2 Highlights;

"Does quantum mechanics provide us with the deepest possible understanding of fundamental behaviors?

I find not, and shockingly present a new classical sequence able to reproduce QM predictions in mine. It's a challenge to follow but have a go. Of course dogma will prevent it emerging! See Declan Traill's short essay for the confirmation it works. Then also;

It seems impossible for everything in physics to be explained by complete simplicity until we think about nature itself. Nature follows a simple path to build complexity from simple beginnings.

Indeed I start with, as the title; 'Absolute Simplicity". ... but then it sure does get complex!

Well done.

Best

Peter

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Vladimir Nikolaevich Fedorov wrote on Feb. 27, 2018 @ 05:24 GMT
Dear Richard,

I highly appreciate your well-written essay in an effort to understand.

Your essay allowed to consider us like-minded people.

I hope that my modest achievements can be information for reflection for you.

Vladimir Fedorov

https://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/3080

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