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David Levan: on 8/7/13 at 9:42am UTC, wrote Best of Luck for the Magnificent Eight ! I am throught the 180 essays, all...

Deepak Vaid: on 8/7/13 at 9:37am UTC, wrote Dear Peter, "Deepak" will do just fine. "Professor" is a bit (no pun...

Deepak Vaid: on 8/7/13 at 9:22am UTC, wrote Dear Paul, Thank you for your kind comments. At first sight your essay...

Cristinel Stoica: on 8/7/13 at 7:45am UTC, wrote Hi, votes are vanishing again.

Paul Borrill: on 8/6/13 at 18:10pm UTC, wrote Deepak - A serious piece of scientific work. Original, well argued,...

eAmazigh HANNOU: on 8/5/13 at 23:02pm UTC, wrote Dear Deepak, We are at the end of this essay contest. In conclusion, at...

Peter Jackson: on 8/5/13 at 12:27pm UTC, wrote Dear Professor Vaid, I regret I reached your essay so late. I found it...

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FQXi FORUM
May 25, 2019

CATEGORY: It From Bit or Bit From It? Essay Contest (2013) [back]
TOPIC: Elementary Particles as Gates for Universal Quantum Computation by Deepak Vaid [refresh]
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Author Deepak Vaid wrote on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 16:12 GMT
Essay Abstract

It is shown that there exists a mapping between the fermions of the Standard Model (SM) represented as braids in the Bilson-Thompson model, and a set of gates which can perform Universal Quantum Computation (UQC). This leads us to conjecture that the ``Computational Universe Hypothesis'' (CUH) can be given a concrete implementation in a new physical framework where elementary particles and the gauge bosons (which intermediate interactions between fermions) are interpreted as the components of a quantum computational network, with the particles serving as quantum computational gates and the gauge fields as the information carrying entities.

Author Bio

Deepak Vaid has a PhD in theoretical physics from the Pennsylvania State University. His interests are in quantum gravity, quantum computation and many-body phenomena. He has been recently appointed to the post of assistant professor in the department of physics at the National Institute of Technology, Karnataka (NITK), India.

Download Essay PDF File

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Yuri Danoyan wrote on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 22:55 GMT
Dear Deepak

How your theory connected with anyons?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anyon

Thank you

Yuri

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 00:23 GMT
Dear Yuri,

The connection with anyons is quite direct. Braiding statistics and anyonic statistics are identical. When you move two anyons (particles living in 2+1 dimensions) around each other you braid their corresponding world-lines and vice-versa.

Deepak

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Vladimir F. Tamari wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 01:01 GMT
Dear Deepak

Your essay title including "universal quantum computation" attaracted me because in my present fqxi essay I conclude that It=Qubit. This is based on my Beautiful Universe Theory BU also found here. My qualitative and preliminary theory describes how particles, radiation, dark energy and matter and the vacuum is built out of a Matrix-array of such quibits exchanging angular momentum in Planck units.

Your essay is restricted to particles, and it is much too technical for me, but I was interested how you underlined braids and preons as possible models. In (BU) only one preon is needed, and its spin could be the 'mechanism' which makes chirality and hence braids possible.

With best wishes,

Vladimir

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Sreenath B N wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 01:56 GMT
Dear Deepak,

It is good to see that you are from Karnataka, my home state.

I have down loaded your essay and soon post my comments on it. Meanwhile, please, go through my essay and post your comments.

Regards and good luck in the contest.

Sreenath BN.

http://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/1827

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Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 13:34 GMT
Dear Deepak,

Thank you for such nice essay, You concluded particle are fundamental building blocks. Here 95% 0f essays are propagating the contrary, cool, you don't like to go with the masses? I also did the same. By the way my children have houses in Bangalore.

I am requesting you to go through my essay also. And I take this opportunity to say, to come to reality and base your...

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Michel Planat wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 15:25 GMT
Dear Deepak,

Interesting essay with a lot of references that partially support the view of the universe as a universal quantum computer.

In

http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/0912.0172

and related writings, I found a relation between three-qubit gates, E8 and the algebra of the standard model.

The quantum computer paradigm is interesting but I work now at more exotic peculiarities of quantum computing (non-locality and contextuality). You have a preliminary account of them in my essay. Feel free to give me your opinion.

Best wishes,

Michel

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 23:47 GMT
Dear Michel,

One of your co-authors is P. Levay. Presumably this is the same Levay who has also worked with Duff on the black-hole-qubit correspondence?

Your work and that of Duff and collaborators critically utilizes three-qubit entanglement. That is also a central-element of my essay. I am presently reading your essay and will post my comments soon.

Thank you for taking the time to read through my work.

Best wishes,

Deepak

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Michel Planat replied on Jul. 4, 2013 @ 06:35 GMT
Dear Deepak,

Yes Peter Levay is one of my collaborators. You can see a recent preprint on ArXiv with him, Metod Saniga and me. One of our current questions concern the 12096 three-qubit pentagrams.

Best wishes,

Michel

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Hoang cao Hai wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 17:51 GMT
Dear Deepak

Your essay somewhat bulky and quite complex - for those who do not delve into this expertise - but it represents a huge amount of work you have done, that is very worth .

Wishing you all good things.

And to change the atmosphere "abstract" of the competition and to demonstrate for the real preeminent possibility of the Absolute theory as well as to clarify the...

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 23:35 GMT
Dear Hong,

Thank you for your kind words. I wish you all the best.

Cheers,

Deepak

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James Lee Hoover wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 17:58 GMT
Deepak,

If given the time and the wits to evaluate over 120 more entries, I have a month to try. My seemingly whimsical title, “It’s good to be the king,” is serious about our subject.

Jim

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 23:52 GMT
Dear Jim or should I say Your Highness,

From this humble subject's perspective you need not read all 120 of them, but only the one written by yours truly :D

Deepak

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Lawrence B Crowell wrote on Jul. 7, 2013 @ 19:12 GMT
Dear Deepak,

I liked your essay. The braid operations are something I touch upon in my essay . The thrust of my argument is that this is generalized into a form of quantum homotopy with associators.

The Bilson-Thompson model and the use of braid groups in LQG seems to have an overlap with the Seiberg-Witten theory with string theory. I have been interested in whether there is some relationship between string theory and LQG. Either they “cooperate” in some way or they are formally contradictory and one (which ever ends up with empirical support) in effect falsifies the other.

Cheers LC

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 8, 2013 @ 05:27 GMT
Hi Lawrence,

Thank you for the compliment. I haven't yet read your essay, but the abstract is certainly interesting. Your statement 'a model of the physical universe encoded by algorithmic means will not compute reality' is something I agree with. That does not, however, mean that one cannot provide a computational interpretation of physics at the level of elementary particles. Whether or not the resulting processes (or "programs") which describe macroscopic physical reality are undecidable is something we have to investigate further.

I also agree with your assertion regarding the relationship between strings and loops. To a lay person, arguing between "strings" and "loops" must sound like an argument between "pots" and "pans". It is inconceivable, to me, that string theory and lqg have no connection. They are like fraternal twins separated at birth. One day they will have to meet and reunite!

I'm not sure what Seiberg-Witten theory is, exactly. Witten has his name attached to so many discoveries, it can be hard to keep track of all of them. I'm looking it up. Hopefully I will learn something new :-D

Cheers,

Deepak

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Lawrence B Crowell wrote on Jul. 8, 2013 @ 17:00 GMT
Dear Deepak,

Where I think things go awry is with black holes and gravity in general. We seem to have no end of trouble making gravitation work with quantum mechanics. There are a number of reasons for this. It is standard to regard QFT as an infinite set of harmonic oscillators in space. If the oscillators pertain to gravity a propagator for that field propagates that field on spacetime, which is the field. As a result there is no general diffeomorphism invariant way to assign amplitudes for quantum gravity. String theory goes somewhat in this direction with a perturbative series in a Lagrangian

L = sqrt{-g}(R + α’^2R^{abcd}R_{abcd} + O(α’^4)),

where in the end this really is a low energy form of quantum gravity. It is background dependent, giving it a certain WKB quality. With LQG the Wilson loops are over SL(2,C), which is noncompact and then gives difficulties with finding a UV finite theory.

The incompleteness I am thinking about is with gravitation and horizons. My argument is rather heuristic, for working up explicit forms of Godel’s incompleteness is a daunting problem and there are only a few cases known --- one of them by Godel in his original paper.

Cheers LC

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Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 9, 2013 @ 12:55 GMT
Dear Deepak,

What an excellent approach using Braiding statistics. If fermions are the gates and bosonic fields carry the information, can either be more fundamental than the other? I like anything based around dimensionality, which you will guess if you get chance to look at my essay.

I really think you are onto something here - well done!

Best wishes,

Antony

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Author Deepak Vaid wrote on Jul. 9, 2013 @ 17:45 GMT
Dear Antony,

Thanks for your kind comments. I read your essay. You present some very interesting ideas.

Best,

Deepak

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Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 21:52 GMT
Hello Deepak,

Thanks very much & glad I read your super essay. So many still to go.

All the best for the contest,

Antony :)

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Hugh Matlock wrote on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 03:04 GMT
Hi Deepak,

A very interesting proposal for a computational substrate. I think it has a great deal more flexibility than the cellular automata models that are rigid with respect to space, and indeed our current computer technology with fixed circuitry.

And that flexibility may be a problem if you try to imagine how you might "program" such a piece of hardware. As particles interact, the circuitry changes, yielding a most unruly piece of hardware. I am not sure the "software" could be expressed in a formal language as we know them, but perhaps consciousness IS the software. Essayist Stephen Lee has suggested an analogy between consciousness and a software agent in the computational model.

In my Software Cosmos essay I take a detailed look at the computational model and simulation paradigm from the top down. Perhaps there is a way to link the top down picture with your bottom up picture.

Hugh

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 08:33 GMT
Hello Hugh,

I read your interesting and thought provoking essay. I think that you present some fascinating observations. If one is to seriously consider the Computational Universe Hypothesis (CUH) as a line of research, then your considerations would amount to an attempt to understand the phenomenological implications of viewing physical processes as computational processes.

Your identification of the implicate/explicate order view of the universe, as conceived by Bohm and Hiley, with the server/client architecture of modern computational networks is a deep observation. I am not sure about your suggested candidates for the mathematical structures which encode the implicate and explicate views.

All in all, it is a well-written essay with several poetic flourishes, and as such, comes much closer to being a serious exploration of the question at hand than many other entries in this contest.

Cheers,

Deepak

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Vladimir F. Tamari wrote on Jul. 18, 2013 @ 02:01 GMT
Dear Deepak. Hello, and apologies if this does not apply to you. I have read and rated your essay and about 50 others. If you have not read, or did not rate my essay The Cloud of Unknowing please consider doing so. With best wishes.

Vladimir

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Sreenath B N wrote on Jul. 20, 2013 @ 16:59 GMT
Dear Deepak,

Your essay is highly innovative in the sense that you are thinking of solving the problem of quantum-gravity (QG) from an entirely different ground, namely, quantum computation. Although my field is not quantum computation, I am doing my research work on QG and so I am curious to know how you are going to accomplish your mission. I would like you to have a look at my work on QG...

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Akinbo Ojo wrote on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 14:29 GMT
Dear Deepak,

I cant pretend to understand the exotic physics in your essay but I can imagine how much intellectual input it contains. Mine is much simpler, not as sophisticated. Perhaps you may have ideas to help fine-tune the model.

Regards,

Akinbo

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Joe Fisher wrote on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 15:14 GMT
Dr. Vaid,

Please excuse me, I am an old decrepit realist and I wish to make a comment about your excellent essay. As I have pointed out and proven in my essay BITTERS, all reality is unique, once. Each real snowflake of the trillions that have fallen or that will ever fall is unique, once. If nature cannot produce identical snowflakes, it follows that each fabricated particle or energy wave...

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Than Tin wrote on Jul. 25, 2013 @ 05:02 GMT
Dr. Vaid

Richard Feynman in his Nobel Acceptance Speech (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/19
65/feynman-lecture.html)

said: “It always seems odd to me that the fundamental laws of physics, when discovered, can appear in so many different forms that are not apparently identical at first, but with a little mathematical fiddling you can show the...

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Sreenath B N wrote on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 01:34 GMT
Dear Dr. Deepak,

I have rated your innovative essay with full of bright points with maximum possible rating. I, hope, you in turn rate my essay accordingly and inform me in my thread.

Best wishes,

Sreenath

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 06:47 GMT
Dear Sreenath,

This is your third comment, so I should say something in response.

First, it appears that you labor under the false assumption that entrants in the FQXi essay contest are under some sort of obligation to read and rate every entry to the contest. There is no such requirement under the rules of the contest and nor is this acceptable social practice.

Secondly you have indicated earlier that you are from Bangalore and you seem to think I'm from Bangalore. I'm not originally from Bangalore, but even if I was, I would feel no obligation to read or rate your essay unless and until I felt it would be of interest to me. Nearness of geographical distance does not imply a similar closeness in one's beliefs or modes of thought.

Third, it is very nice of you to have given my essay the "maximum possible rating". But that was your choice. I have never asked you (or anyone else for that matter) to rate, or let alone read, my essay. Once again, I feel no obligation to read and rate your essay as a quid pro quo. In fact, doing so would almost seem to border on being unethical.

I hope you will not find my reply offensive. I am only trying to clear some misconceptions you seem to harbor, without myself generating any further doubts or confusions in your mind. Straightforward language would appear to be the best way to do so.

Best,

Deepak

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Douglas Alexander Singleton wrote on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 08:28 GMT
Dear Dr. Vaid,

I only scanned your article but did spend a bit more time on preon model which you present toward the end. In some sense there is a strong indication that some kind of composite/preon model like this may/should be realized since the muon, tau, c-quark, s-quark etc. look for all the world like "excitations" of the first generation. I realize that the main thrust of your essay was the connection of this model with information/information processing, but is it possible in get some thing like the 2nd and 3rd family from this model? Also this model seems similar to the family model Zweibach presents in his nice intro book to string theory but this preon model is much more economical (if I remember correctly in the strong model Zweibach presents he needs a different D-brane for every generation and as well for quarks and leptons there should be separate D-branes. Here, from figure 4, it appear one needs only two "branes". One possible way to test such a picture would be if it were possible to calculate the magnetic moment of the electron and electron neutrino. If this is possible one could obtain a post-diction for the electron magnetic moment and a prediction for the electron neutrino magnetic moment (the SM predicts a small magnetic moment for the neutrino but at a level beyond current experiments). Anyway this is a nice and (for me) novel compositeness/preon model.

Best,

Doug

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 09:32 GMT
Dear Prof. Singleton,

Thank you for reading my essay and your appreciative comments.

The question of generations is very pertinent. One possibility is to assign colors to braids. Then one would have to consider braids where ribbons all have the same colors, but also braids with differently colored ribbons. Such a construction appears to naturally arise in Gurau approach to "Colored Group Field Theory" arXiv:0907.2582v1. A priori, all colors would have equal standing. In order to make contact with the observed mass gaps between the various generations of the standard model, one would then need some sort of mechanism to break the degeneracy allowing us to distinguish between differently colored braids.

Zweibach's book is the one place where I first found that something very similar to the preon model appeared to exist in string theory. This was an inspiration for me to believe in the correctness of my approach. The fact that the same (or similar) construction arises in both string theory and via the LQG route advocated by me, suggests a point of contact between the two approaches to quantum gravity. Apart from the naive observation that the structures used in loops and strings appear to be essentially identical, one also needs more concrete steps to bring the two together. The preon model is a candidate for providing such a concrete connection.

As for experimental predictions, as yet I have no idea how to go about performing any of the calculations which you suggest for preons. As is generally the case, the way forward will likely appear to be obvious once I find it, but till then it will seem to be an intractable problem.

Cheers,

Deepak

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john stephan selye wrote on Aug. 2, 2013 @ 01:55 GMT
Having read so many insightful essays, I am probably not the only one to find that my views have crystallized, and that I can now move forward with growing confidence. I cannot exactly say who in the course of the competition was most inspiring - probably it was the continuous back and forth between so many of us. In this case, we should all be grateful to each other.

If I may, I'd like to...

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Héctor Daniel Gianni wrote on Aug. 2, 2013 @ 20:00 GMT
Dear Deepak Vaid:

I am an old physician and I don’t know nothing of mathematics and almost nothing of physics,

But maybe you would be interested in my essay over a subject which after the common people, physic discipline is the one that uses more than any other, the so called “time”. No one that I know ever...

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Peter Jackson wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 12:27 GMT
Dear Professor Vaid,

I regret I reached your essay so late. I found it authoratitive, incicive and assured. It should certainly make the final cut and I hope my top marks will help it do so. But far more important is the science;

My own essay has been lauded, (Blog comments include; "groundbreaking, "clearly significant", "astonishing", "fantastic", "wonderful", "remarkable!", "deeply impressed", etc. But I have no PhD in physics and it is a simple geometrically based discovery. What hit me was the constant stream of harmonic concepts from reading your essay, including in Sundance's 'twisted strands'. (unfortunately he hasn't answered my post).

I won't raise these here as you are far better qualified than me to analyse them, so I hope you'll read my essay and discuss them. I build an ontology including defining the difference between computation and natural evolution.

The foundations of the model underpinning the essay are described in my previous two, both top ten scorers but passed over by the judges as too far 'off doctrine' I suspect. I greatly look forward to any comments and advice you may give. It currently lies in the top few but I still suspect the fully implications have not yet been recognised. Do they still make new paradigms or are we now too late?

Very well done and thank you for yours.

Peter

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 09:37 GMT
Dear Peter,

"Deepak" will do just fine. "Professor" is a bit (no pun intended) of an exaggeration.

In looking through your essay, I failed to identify any central thread. There is a great proliferation of concepts and hypotheses, but nothing seems to stand out. You say that: It's been assumed that simple 0,1 spin states are all a photon has to offer. I don't see what you're talking about. The whole point of quantum computation is that it supersedes the binary choice of classical computation, by providing access to arbitrary superpositions of 0 and 1. It would appear that quantum computation in its traditional and universally accepted form already incorporates the "excluded middle" which you refer to.

You have made a commendable effort, but I cannot honestly say that I see anything new in your work.

Best,

Deepak

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eAmazigh M. HANNOU wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 23:02 GMT
Dear Deepak,

We are at the end of this essay contest.

In conclusion, at the question to know if Information is more fundamental than Matter, there is a good reason to answer that Matter is made of an amazing mixture of eInfo and eEnergy, at the same time.

Matter is thus eInfo made with eEnergy rather than answer it is made with eEnergy and eInfo ; because eInfo is eEnergy, and...

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Paul Borrill wrote on Aug. 6, 2013 @ 18:10 GMT
Deepak - A serious piece of scientific work. Original, well argued, provokative and very well presented. Top marks. Thank you.

If you get the opportunity, I would be most honored if you were to review my essay.

http://fqxi.org/data/forum-attachments/Borrill-TimeOne
-V1.1a.pdf (I have no idea why the fqxi web site breaks up this url).

Kind regards, Paul

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Author Deepak Vaid replied on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 09:22 GMT
Dear Paul,

Thank you for your kind comments. At first sight your essay also appears to be serious, scientific and well argued.

There are many aspects to the problem of quantum gravity. Understanding the structure of particles is only one of them. Understanding the emergence of time and space in the setting of a computational network - which you appear to address in your essay - is another one. As I said, at first glance, your thesis appears to be something quite innovative and intriguing. I'm reading through it and will get back to you once I have a better understanding of your thesis.

Best,

Deepak

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Cristinel Stoica wrote on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 07:45 GMT
Hi, votes are vanishing again.

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David Levan wrote on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 09:42 GMT
Best of Luck for the Magnificent Eight !

I am throught the 180 essays, all rated. For me 2/3 of them were poor and other 1/6 curious. The rest (1/6) have I rated over 4/10.

You are among the authors of the top essays from my sight - alphabetically :

Corda, D'Ariano, Maguire, Rogozhin, Singleton, Sreenath, Vaid, Vishwakarma,

and I hope one of you will be the winner. (Please, don't rate my essay.)

David

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