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ABOUT THE FQXi PODCAST

The FQXi podcast brings you the latest ideas in foundational physics and cosmology—and includes interviews with our members and other leading scientists. It's hosted by Zeeya Merali and Brendan Foster. You can contact us at podcast@fqxi.org, and follow us on twitter: @FQXi. The podcast is produced by Zeeya, and music is provided by Baltimore-based Diefenbaker.
RECENT FORUM POSTS

Steve Agnew: "For most macroscopic actions, the notions of continuous space and time work..." in Real-Time Physics

Pentcho Valev: "Einstein's False Postulate That Killed Physics Einstein's 1905..." in New Podcast: A MICROSCOPE...

Joe Fisher: "Dear Georgina, Real matter is real infinite surface. It is observable..." in Collapsing Physics: Q&A...

Georgina Woodward: "Hi Don, I can't claim any expertise in human psychology but, like you,..." in Physics of the Observer -...

Don Limuti: "Hi Georgina, Yes, there are always "considerations". And after the..." in Physics of the Observer -...

Eckard Blumschein: "Sommerfeld's constant alpha equals Z_0/4 times G_0. The latter is the so..." in Real-Time Physics

Georgina Woodward: "Joe, Further to:I don't think invisibility makes something unreal. The..." in Collapsing Physics: Q&A...

John Cox: "Tom, you are asking a 'user profile', that doesn't want to be identified..." in New Podcast: A MICROSCOPE...


RECENT ARTICLES
click titles to read articles

Collapsing Physics: Q&A with Catalina Oana Curceanu
Tests of a rival to quantum theory, taking place in the belly of the Gran Sasso d'Italia mountain, could reveal how the fuzzy subatomic realm of possibilities comes into sharp macroscopic focus.

Dropping Schrödinger's Cat Into a Black Hole
Combining gravity with the process that transforms the fuzzy uncertainty of the quantum realm into the definite classical world we see around us could lead to a theory of quantum gravity.

Does Quantum Weirdness Arise When Parallel Classical Worlds Repel?
Quantum mechanics could derive from subtle interactions among unseen neighboring universes

Wrinkles in Spacetime
Searching for defects in the fabric of the cosmos could help physicists home in on the correct theory of quantum gravity.

Blurring Causal Lines
Quantum experiments mix past and future on the microscopic scale—opening the door to faster computers and revising our notion of causality.



PODCAST
May 30, 2016

Complete Podcast
 
The FQXi May 2, 2016 Podcast features:
  • Gravitational Waves & a MICROSCOPE on Galileo
  • Wrinkles in Spacetime
  • A Quantum Horror Story
INFO: MP3 file / 42 minutes / 41 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
DISCUSS in the FQXi Community Forum
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Featured video in this podcast:
Individual Stories
Gravitational Waves & a MICROSCOPE on Galileo
In the news: the MICROSCOPE experiment launches to test the equivalence principle, as Zeeya and Brendan discuss. And a special report on how the detection of gravitational waves will enable physicists to probe quantum gravity and neutron stars. LIGO physicist Alessandra Buonanno and quantum gravity expert Ted Jacobson talk to Brendan Foster.
INFO: MP3 file / 17 minutes / 16 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
Wrinkles in Spacetime
Physicist Sabine Hossenfelder describes her search for defects in spacetime, which could help home in on a theory of quantum gravity, to reporter Colin Stuart.
INFO: MP3 file / 8 minutes / 8 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
RELATED LINKS:
A Quantum Horror Story
Are you scared of the monster under the bed? Author Liam Hogan reads his spooky award-winning short story, Ana, and chats about his background in physics and his writing to Zeeya Merali.
INFO: MP3 file / 17 minutes / 17 MB
DOWNLOAD (right-click Windows, control-click Mac)
LISTEN:
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Recent Comments


Einstein's False Postulate That Killed Physics

Einstein's 1905 constant-speed-of-light postulate has two aspects:

1. Any light moving in a vacuum has the same constant speed, c = 299,792 kilometers per second, as measured by any observer.

2. If the observer were to hurry towards the light source (his speed changes), he would again measure the same constant speed, c = 299,792 kilometers per second.

The first aspect has been disproved - the speed of light travelling...


Tom,

you are asking a 'user profile', that doesn't want to be identified on Physics Stack Exchange.

And one which is robotically predictable as somebody doing card tricks in a bar using psychological diversions of attention to prompt personal responses, and when that wears thin goes to the one trick that IS simple physics; cutting a deck to show an ace which only takes practice and a fresh deck.


"The blow Einstein landed on human rationality ..."

Suppose you define "rational" for us.

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