Search FQXi


If you are aware of an interesting new academic paper (that has been published in a peer-reviewed journal or has appeared on the arXiv), a conference talk (at an official professional scientific meeting), an external blog post (by a professional scientist) or a news item (in the mainstream news media), which you think might make an interesting topic for an FQXi blog post, then please contact us at forums@fqxi.org with a link to the original source and a sentence about why you think that the work is worthy of discussion. Please note that we receive many such suggestions and while we endeavour to respond to them, we may not be able to reply to all suggestions.

Please also note that we do not accept unsolicited posts and we cannot review, or open new threads for, unsolicited articles or papers. Requests to review or post such materials will not be answered. If you have your own novel physics theory or model, which you would like to post for further discussion among then FQXi community, then please add them directly to the "Alternative Models of Reality" thread, or to the "Alternative Models of Cosmology" thread. Thank you.

Forum Home
Introduction
Terms of Use

Order posts by:
 chronological order
 most recent first

Posts by the blogger are highlighted in orange; posts by FQXi Members are highlighted in blue.

By using the FQXi Forum, you acknowledge reading and agree to abide by the Terms of Use

 RSS feed | RSS help
RECENT POSTS IN THIS TOPIC

Steve Dufourny: on 2/5/11 at 13:55pm UTC, wrote thanks Tom,it's cool. Regards Steev

T H Ray: on 2/3/11 at 17:37pm UTC, wrote Steve, Personally, I use MathType with MS Office. But those are programs...

Steve Dufourny: on 2/3/11 at 16:44pm UTC, wrote Dear Tom, Have you an other program please for the signs and symbols, easy...

Steve Dufourny: on 2/2/11 at 12:58pm UTC, wrote Hi all, Dear anomymous.......to be or not to be , that is the question!!! ...

T H Ray: on 2/1/11 at 11:53am UTC, wrote Remember, the award is given to a postdoc, not to an established practicing...

Anonymous: on 1/31/11 at 0:57am UTC, wrote Is "a physicist who works part-time as an analyst at an investment bank"...

Graham: on 1/28/11 at 20:54pm UTC, wrote well done The Rutherford of our time Keep up the original thinking and...

laura: on 1/28/11 at 17:28pm UTC, wrote congrats dude xx


RECENT FORUM POSTS

Georgina Woodward: "Joe, sensory products are what is seen. Illumination matters because it..." in The Sudoku Universe, Why...

fally jonash: "It is a well-maintained site where people can learn about various topics. I..." in A Wonderful Outcome

fally jonash: "Your article is very interesting and fantastic, at the same time the theme..." in In Search Of Other Earths

Joe Fisher: "Dear Georgina, The (INVISIBLE) “sensory products” you keep writing..." in The Sudoku Universe, Why...

Joe Fisher: "Dear Georgina, I failed to mention that although conventional chess game..." in The Complexity Conundrum

Joe Fisher: "Dear Steve Agnew, On December 7, 2017, I have emailed : “Dear..." in The Complexity Conundrum

Lena Smith: "All HP printers carry a unique qualities. if the product is still under..." in Conjuring a Neutron Star...

Lena Smith: "All HP printers carry a unique qualities. if the product is still under..." in Conjuring a Neutron Star...


RECENT ARTICLES
click titles to read articles

The Complexity Conundrum
Resolving the black hole firewall paradox—by calculating what a real astronaut would compute at the black hole's edge.

Quantum Dream Time
Defining a ‘quantum clock’ and a 'quantum ruler' could help those attempting to unify physics—and solve the mystery of vanishing time.

Our Place in the Multiverse
Calculating the odds that intelligent observers arise in parallel universes—and working out what they might see.

Sounding the Drums to Listen for Gravity’s Effect on Quantum Phenomena
A bench-top experiment could test the notion that gravity breaks delicate quantum superpositions.

Watching the Observers
Accounting for quantum fuzziness could help us measure space and time—and the cosmos—more accurately.


FQXi BLOGS
December 11, 2017

CATEGORY: Blog [back]
TOPIC: Most Courageous Postdoc Winner: Daniel Bedingham! [refresh]
Bookmark and Share
Login or create account to post reply or comment.

FQXi Administrator Zeeya Merali wrote on Jan. 28, 2011 @ 11:10 GMT
Daniel Bedingham
Last September, FQXi put out a call for nominations for a new award honoring the Most Courageous Postdoc conducting research on foundational physics or cosmology. An external panel of experts reviewed all the entries and unanimously selected Daniel Bedingham, a quantum physicist at Imperial College London, as the winner (pictured, right). You can read more about his research here.

The prize was the brainchild of FQXi member, Sabine Hossenfelder, an assistant professor at the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics. Sabine won an FQXi mini-grant and requested that it be used to establish an award that would "encourage young people to not passively swim with the mainstream, but to take a risk and try something genuinely novel."

The winner, Daniel Bedingham, is a physicist who works part-time as an analyst at an investment bank while carrying out research at Imperial. He was nominated by Philip Pearle, at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York , who commended the quality of Bedingham’s research on quasi-relativistic dynamical collapse theories and his dedication to foundational research, despite the financial sacrifice.

Daniel Bedingham wins an award of $1000 and FQXi membership. Congratulations Daniel!

Q&A with Daniel Bedingham.

this post has been edited by the forum administrator

report post as inappropriate


Steve Dufourny wrote on Jan. 28, 2011 @ 15:29 GMT
Hi dear Zeeya ,all,

Happy to see this article.

Congratulations Daniel.

Best

Steve

report post as inappropriate


laura wrote on Jan. 28, 2011 @ 17:28 GMT
congrats dude xx

report post as inappropriate


Graham wrote on Jan. 28, 2011 @ 20:54 GMT
well done

The Rutherford of our time

Keep up the original thinking and testing the establishment

report post as inappropriate


Anonymous wrote on Jan. 31, 2011 @ 00:57 GMT
Is "a physicist who works part-time as an analyst at an investment bank" the most courageous postdoc? This rather is a choice of money and very "helpful to one’s career".... not very courageous for a physicist. Moreover doing quantum physics in the quantum physicist institute of the Imperial College London is not exactly what I mean for ... "local environment being unsupportive or even outright discouraging".

Postdocs, don't loose your time in foundation of physics. Be brave and go to work in a bank!

FQXi .... please!

report post as inappropriate

T H Ray replied on Feb. 1, 2011 @ 11:53 GMT
Remember, the award is given to a postdoc, not to an established practicing physicist. As I read the article, I get that the individual was nominated for the quality of his research output. Such quality is usually only possible for one with the luxury of devoting his time to research alone.

If one doubts that it takes a great deal of grit and determination (I think that's what "courage" means in this context) to research and publish quality work while holding down a day job, one should give it a try.

Tom

report post as inappropriate

Steve Dufourny replied on Feb. 2, 2011 @ 12:58 GMT
Hi all,

Dear anomymous.......to be or not to be , that is the question!!!

Regards

Steve

report post as inappropriate

Steve Dufourny replied on Feb. 3, 2011 @ 16:44 GMT
Dear Tom,

Have you an other program please for the signs and symbols, easy of utilization?

Regards

Steve

report post as inappropriate


Login or create account to post reply or comment.

Please enter your e-mail address:
Note: Joining the FQXi mailing list does not give you a login account or constitute membership in the organization.