Search FQXi


If you are aware of an interesting new academic paper (that has been published in a peer-reviewed journal or has appeared on the arXiv), a conference talk (at an official professional scientific meeting), an external blog post (by a professional scientist) or a news item (in the mainstream news media), which you think might make an interesting topic for an FQXi blog post, then please contact us at forums@fqxi.org with a link to the original source and a sentence about why you think that the work is worthy of discussion. Please note that we receive many such suggestions and while we endeavour to respond to them, we may not be able to reply to all suggestions.

Please also note that we do not accept unsolicited posts and we cannot review, or open new threads for, unsolicited articles or papers. Requests to review or post such materials will not be answered. If you have your own novel physics theory or model, which you would like to post for further discussion among then FQXi community, then please add them directly to the "Alternative Models of Reality" thread, or to the "Alternative Models of Cosmology" thread. Thank you.

Contests Home

Current Essay Contest


Contest Partners: Jaan Tallinn, The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, The John Templeton Foundation, and Scientific American

Previous Contests

Trick or Truth: The Mysterious Connection Between Physics and Mathematics
Contest Partners: Nanotronics Imaging, The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, and The John Templeton Foundation
Media Partner: Scientific American

read/discusswinners

How Should Humanity Steer the Future?
January 9, 2014 - August 31, 2014
Contest Partners: Jaan Tallinn, The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, The John Templeton Foundation, and Scientific American
read/discusswinners

It From Bit or Bit From It
March 25 - June 28, 2013
Contest Partners: The Gruber Foundation, J. Templeton Foundation, and Scientific American
read/discusswinners

Questioning the Foundations
Which of Our Basic Physical Assumptions Are Wrong?
May 24 - August 31, 2012
Contest Partners: The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, SubMeta, and Scientific American
read/discusswinners

Is Reality Digital or Analog?
November 2010 - February 2011
Contest Partners: The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation and Scientific American
read/discusswinners

What's Ultimately Possible in Physics?
May - October 2009
Contest Partners: Astrid and Bruce McWilliams
read/discusswinners

The Nature of Time
August - December 2008
read/discusswinners

Forum Home
Introduction
Terms of Use

Order posts by:
 chronological order
 most recent first

Posts by the author are highlighted in orange; posts by FQXi Members are highlighted in blue.

By using the FQXi Forum, you acknowledge reading and agree to abide by the Terms of Use

 RSS feed | RSS help
RECENT POSTS IN THIS TOPIC

sasa sasa: on 4/25/17 at 1:56am UTC, wrote OBAT MAAG adalah obat yang paling manjur untuk mengobati stroke.OBAT MAAG...

Scarlet Kleen: on 2/6/17 at 11:35am UTC, wrote of course education matters but still being humane is what will save...

Don Limuti: on 6/12/14 at 18:05pm UTC, wrote Dear Christine, I do think our essays are very complimentary, and they are...

Christine Dantas: on 6/9/14 at 10:42am UTC, wrote Dear Don, I finally read your essay, and I hope it goes well in the...

Don Limuti: on 6/7/14 at 5:02am UTC, wrote Hi Neil, Your 1.2x concept as I mentioned on your blog is the best idea...

Neil Bates: on 6/6/14 at 23:54pm UTC, wrote Don, As an educator and pro-education political activist, I agree that...

Don Limuti: on 6/6/14 at 19:30pm UTC, wrote Hi Lorraine, Your comments are very much appreciated, and I wish I had...

Lorraine Ford: on 6/6/14 at 14:03pm UTC, wrote Hi Don, When I read your essay, I thought of the girls of Pakistan, and...


RECENT FORUM POSTS

Joe Fisher: "Dear Steve, Please try to understand that infinite surface am not a..." in Watching the Observers

Steve Agnew: "Supposing the universe is infinite is simply another way of supposing the..." in Watching the Observers

kurt stocklmeir: "spring constant of time and space is not linear - this influences a lot of..." in Alternative Models of...

Kevin Adams: "Very interesting theme! Thanks a lot for this information. I just going to..." in Multiversal Journeys —...

Colin Richardson: ""According to quantum mechanics, a vacuum isn't empty at all. It's actually..." in Manipulating the Quantum...

Lorraine Ford: "Dear Rajiv, I have already addressed your 3 points, but I will put it to..." in FQXi Essay Contest 2016:...

Peter Morgan: "An e-mail sent to me by Springer Nature today tells me that because I am at..." in Manipulating the Quantum...

munized ward: "Variety exists inside all populaces of life forms. This happens somewhat in..." in Natural Selection in...


RECENT ARTICLES
click titles to read articles

Watching the Observers
Accounting for quantum fuzziness could help us measure space and time—and the cosmos—more accurately.

Bohemian Reality: Searching for a Quantum Connection to Consciousness
Is there are sweet spot where artificial intelligence systems could have the maximum amount of consciousness while retaining powerful quantum properties?

Quantum Replicants: Should future androids dream of quantum sheep?
To build the ultimate artificial mimics of real life systems, we may need to use quantum memory.

Painting a QBist Picture of Reality
A radical interpretation of physics makes quantum theory more personal.

The Spacetime Revolutionary
Carlo Rovelli describes how black holes may transition to "white holes," according to loop quantum gravity, a radical rewrite of fundamental physics.


FQXi FORUM
June 24, 2017

CATEGORY: How Should Humanity Steer the Future? Essay Contest (2014) [back]
TOPIC: Steering the Future to Education by Don Limuti [refresh]
Bookmark and Share
Login or create account to post reply or comment.

Author Don Limuti wrote on May. 2, 2014 @ 18:12 GMT
Essay Abstract

How Should Humanity Steer the Future? Answer: By developing the best capital (value for the future). And what creates the best capital? Answer: An educated populace. We need to steer the future to get the best educated populace. I think we can have a public safety net and have a comprehensive public education system fueling a private enterprise sector with lower taxes than we have presently. The basic ideas presented apply to most countries, but the USA is used as the example.

Author Bio

Don Limuti graduated from CCNY and has worked creatively as an EE and as a theoretical physicist. This is his sixth FQXi essay contest. The other entries were: 1. Making Time with Pretty Girls and Hot Stoves 2. Gravity from the Ground Up 3. Making Waves 4. An Elephant in the Room and 5. Information, Misinformation, and High Philosophy. He has a paper on gravity titled “Mercury’s Precession Reconsidered” published by The Prespacetime Journal. He would like to see free higher education made available for all who desire it. Check out his web site www.digitalwavetheory.com

Download Essay PDF File




Judy Nabb wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 09:02 GMT
Don,

Yours is the first essay I've read that hits the nail on the head about education, apart from Peter J who identifies it more subtly. I agree you are absolutely correct. You also argued the case well for a short essay. (and I didn't know Apple provided such a deal!).

I discuss eugenics, which we increasingly have to face, but seems powerless in the most important area, improving and evolving the intellect of the population. Peter talks of the undeveloped potential power of the quantum computer in our heads and suggests teaching new ways of using it. I agree, but it's a bottom up process, eugenics a can't do it. We need free education and better educational methods.

I was attracted by your title and abstract, but it's a comment on humanity that no others have been. I have a strange feeling of power because a fair score will put you at the head of the community scores, momentarily at least. I apologise for almost certainly steering you to an ensuing future helter skelter down!

Judy

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 02:16 GMT
Hi Judy,

Thanks for your support. This was a much tougher essay than the others. I could not put concepts into mathematical form, and say see, see my concept is true. A recent book I read "How the Scotts Invented the Modern World" pointed out how the Scotts were ahead of other nations in literacy, and how this powered a tiny nation to lead the world to higher levels of prosperity. However, the Scotts who were very influential to the forming of the USA did not make education "fundamental" and lost their edge in the 20th century.

I look forward to reading your essay,

Don Limuti




Judy Nabb wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 09:09 GMT
Don,

I apologise, I'm signed in with my code but seem unable to score your essay. Perhaps I can't influence the future after all. I'll check the instructions.

Judy

report post as inappropriate

Member Marc Séguin replied on May. 4, 2014 @ 22:35 GMT
I've been having the same problem: I can't rate essays using Firefox or Internet Explorer, but when I use Google Chrome, somehow it works... Is it something wrong with my computer, or with the FQXi website?

report post as inappropriate


Anonymous wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 21:29 GMT
Dear Don,

Good to see you this time. I must say that yours is a very thoughtful and practical essay. I take particular note of the following:

"...thesis is that the best educated populace will create the best and most productive free market."

“…the funding for education should be constant, and considered the substratum of economic activity”

"...Education methods evolve and are subject to individual choice, and there needs to be a variety of methods and schools to choose from. There will be winners and losers in this competition."

Somehow, I find myself wanting to really think about points raised in this essay.

For instance, in my country as in some others, there is a problem of corruption; how do you think this will play out if we had to pay people to go to school?

Best scores, Don.

Chidi Idika

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 8, 2014 @ 02:34 GMT
Hi Chidi,

Glad you are in the contest, and thanks for visiting.

I do not think the scheme I presented is very open to corruption.

If education subsumes social security, welfare, and unemployment

there is a lot less bureaucracy to become corrupt.

Don L.



Chidi Idika replied on May. 10, 2014 @ 13:38 GMT
Dear Don,

Speaking of education as a way to steer humanity aright, this piece is worth far more than a 3.4 score. So here I go for practicals.

Chidi

report post as inappropriate


James Dunn wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 21:36 GMT
Social Security for the elderly is absolutely necessary because of failing health and the need to reduce the population. If people choose not to have children in support of population control then they need social security to offset businesses unwilling to hire senior citizens. Not everyone is mentally talented and can run their own business. Not everyone can find investments that do not degrade with time.

Republicans consistently promote unethical allocation of resources and opportunities.

What I find disgusting is that the majority of social security we pay goes into the Federal general fund, and not for social security benefits !!!

Republican supported unethical allocation of resources.

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 02:38 GMT
James,

I agree with you completely. However, I think you missed my intent. I want to turn Social Security into education, but not in a burdensome way. Let's say that right now you are collecting Social Security and using it to pay for food and shelter, nothing changes with my plan except now the recipient of "Social Security" has the opportunity to enroll in classes of their choosing. They are not forced to take classes, it is their choice. They collect a check just as before, but now they have the option of enriching their lives. To boot, they can say they are receiving a scholarship instead of collecting Social Security. The result may be the same, but the context is much better (IMHO).

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Don Limuti




Rick Beers wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 22:01 GMT
Bush (Republican) was quoted as saying that "...education is for the wealthy, as it should be."

Bush and Cheney created and supported Al-Quida (arabic for "the corporation"), with the full support of the Republican Party.

Bush ordered the US Army Corp of Engineers to NOT help New Orleans stop the flooding. They were ready to deploy within hours. The Corps of Engineers was going to sink a barge and block the levy hole with sand bags around the sunken barge. The Republicans wanted to destroy the homes of the poor and drive them out of their homes. New Orleans created an ordinance during the flooding that made it impossible for the people to rebuild their homes; requiring $200,000 homes to be built as a minimum on a lot size that exceeded most of the lots deeded at that time. Republican developers then came in and stole the property when people did not pay the taxes on property the ordinance preventing them from using.

If you are a Republican, you support corruption in the worst of ways; Blind allegiance. Or you are yourself corrupt.

I will NEVER again vote for a Republican, or anyone that votes on Bills as a Republican.

Your proposal offends me in the worst of ways.

report post as inappropriate

James Dunn replied on May. 3, 2014 @ 22:37 GMT
Hi Rick,

I understand how you feel. Before Katrina the cost of fuel was $1.64 and after Katrina fuel jumped to almost $3 and then 911 was used to push prices up to $4. It certainly looks like Republicans are coordinating major disasters for personal gains of large corporations. While they manipulate smaller businesses into thinking they are being taken care of. Sometime, look at pro corporation bills and see who votes which way. You can spot the Republicans that are holding offices as Democrats.

Don't listen to what politicians say, find out how they are voting !

Rep Carl Levin in Michigan seems to be almost bi-partisan; I haven't followed his activities in a while.

I know education is tied to the government and politics, but political ranting is a bit off topic.

That seems to be a worthy subject regarding the steering of humanity if the topic ever comes up again. Methods of Fighting Corruption in Government

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 02:51 GMT
Hi Rick and James,

I singled out Ronald Reagan, because of his actions regarding education in the state of California. Personally I do not think he had much of a choice in the matter, the voters twisted his arm.

When it comes to Politics, I think it is best to make evaluations based on "unselfish motives". From my viewpoint both parties have a good deal of posturing and selfishness.

Perhaps the next essay contest should be "The Physics of Politics"

Thanks for visiting,

Don Limuti




Edwin Eugene Klingman wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 23:47 GMT
Dear Don Limuti,

It's always a joy to read your essays. And this one is particularly joyful, as you have written six pages on a proposal that I only made on my last page -- which is to pay people to learn. We overlap exactly in two areas. Here is a quote from my essay:

"Why not an educational fund to replace the welfare that pays people to do nothing? Base it on paying people to...

view entire post


report post as inappropriate

Edwin Eugene Klingman replied on May. 3, 2014 @ 23:50 GMT
Don,

I currently have a 5.9 score, and I tried to give you a 6, but, like Judy Nabb above, the system did not let me score you. You better check with FQXi...

Edwin Eugene Klingman

report post as inappropriate

Member Marc Séguin replied on May. 4, 2014 @ 22:36 GMT
I've been having the same problem: I can't rate essays using Firefox or Internet Explorer, but when I use Google Chrome, somehow it works... Is it something wrong with my computer, or with the FQXi website?

report post as inappropriate

Member Marc Séguin replied on May. 4, 2014 @ 22:47 GMT
Hi Don, Hi Edwin,

I agree with you both that education is key if we want humanity to successfully steer the future. You have focused on the accessibility of education, and on strategies to make people invest in their education. In my essay, I suggested that countries that have community service or military service could have their citizens replace this service by going to school (which could be done virtually by using MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses)).

I also believe that, to optimize the impact of education in steering the future, we should refocus the curriculum on issues that are the most important for the future of humanity... what I call the "Futurocentric Curriculum". If you have the time to check out my essay, rate it and comment on it, I would greatly appreciate it... In particular, I am interested in finding out the opinion of others concerning which topics should be part of a futurocentric curriculum...

Marc

report post as inappropriate


Wilhelmus de Wilde wrote on May. 4, 2014 @ 15:34 GMT
Dear Don,

It is always a pleasure to meet again when we have made our points through essays here on FQXi.

I have read your contribution and indeed in Holland we say " When you own youth you own the future", and indeed the egoism of several generations is the origin of forgetting what our real goal is in this short life.

Maybe humans are living too short to take care of the future...

I hope that you will find some time to read my entrance : "STEERING THE FUTURE OF CONSCIOUSNESS" where the item of our possible posterity is also a (short) point of reflection, parhaps leave a comment on my thread and/or leave a rating that is in conformity with your appreciation 5pls do not leave any numbers...)

Good luck

Wilhelmus

report post as inappropriate

Wilhelmus de Wilde replied on May. 4, 2014 @ 15:36 GMT
same problem as Edwin, the rating I gave is not coming through..

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 03:30 GMT
Hi Wilhelmus,

Education for youth is a priority. I would like to make education for everybody a priority.

I am going to enroll in your course of Consciousness 101, but first I need to read your essay.

Good to see you in another contest,

Don Limuti




Georgina Woodward wrote on May. 4, 2014 @ 22:07 GMT
Hi Don,

a very clearly set out, enjoyable read. Sensible suggestions though I wonder about whether all unemployed would want more education. There may well be school drop outs and those that did badly in the education system. The type of schooling would have to be very different.I'm not sure the Apple model could be scaled up.Though it sounds very good. There really has to be motivation to learn and minimum wage jobs still need doing.Also more education does not necessarily create more suitable jobs and then there are graduates who can't find suitable work and end up unemployed or in minimum wage jobs anyway. The advantage of your proposition is that they don't also have a large debt to repay from receiving a student loan.

Good luck,Georgina

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 03:58 GMT
Hi Georgina,

GOOD TO SEE YOU IN ANOTHER CONTEST. THANKS FOR VISITING MY BLOG. I AM WRITING IN CAPS TO CONTRAST WITH YOUR COMMENTS. SEE BELOW.

Sensible suggestions though I wonder about whether all unemployed would want more education.

MY INTENT IS THAT TAKING COURSES IS VOLUNTARY, AS LONG AS YOU ARE NOT WORKING IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR YOU CAN RECEIVE THE EDUCATION STIPEND IF YOU ARE ENROLLED IN A SCHOOL.

There may well be school drop outs and those that did badly in the education system.

SCHOOL DROPOUTS AND FAILURE IS A CRIME PERPETRATED BY THE CURRENT EDUCATION SYSTEM!

The type of schooling would have to be very different.

YES, INDEED!

I'm not sure the Apple model could be scaled up.

I'M NOT SURE EITHER, BUT IT IS WORTH SERIOUS THOUGHT

Though it sounds very good. There really has to be motivation to learn and minimum wage jobs still need doing.

IF THE EDUCATIONAL OFFERINGS ARE APPROPRIATE, THERE WILL BE MOTIVATION. MINIMUM WAGE JOBS WILL GO AWAY...AND GOOD RIDDANCE. THE JOBS WILL GET DONE BY THE PRIVATE SECTOR BUT THEY WILL PAY MORE.

Also more education does not necessarily create more suitable jobs and then there are graduates who can't find suitable work and end up unemployed or in minimum wage jobs anyway.

THE PURPOSE OF EDUCATION IS NOT TO CREATE JOBS, IT IS TO CREATE THE ENVIRONMENT WHERE JOBS CAN EMERGE.

The advantage of your proposition is that they don't also have a large debt to repay from receiving a student loan.

I THINK THIS IS ONE OF MANY ADVANTAGES.

GOOD TO SEE YOU IN ANOTHER CONTEST, LOOK FORWARD READING YOUR ESSAY,

DON LIMUTI



Georgina Woodward replied on May. 18, 2014 @ 01:10 GMT
Hi Don,

thanks for your replies. Yes there are many foreseeable advantages. I particularly like your reply THE PURPOSE OF EDUCATION IS NOT TO CREATE JOBS, IT IS TO CREATE THE ENVIRONMENT WHERE JOBS CAN EMERGE.Thank you. Georgina

report post as inappropriate


KoGuan Leo wrote on May. 5, 2014 @ 05:37 GMT
Hi Don,

Excellent as usual. I fully support free-education for life for everyone. The idea that citizens are not only to have free-education but they would be paid to be educated and trained to give them the tools to realize their dreams and aspirations. Yes, there is no but but and but, but yes for yes, yes and yes. Many times, "but" means lack of imagination, being simply lazy or being simply defender of interested groups or simply afraid of new and untested ideas. I rated a ten for this brave idea that I also supported and proposed through what I called the Scientific Outlook Free-Lunch Economic System.

I wish you doing well.

Best,

Leo KoGuan

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 04:33 GMT
Dear KoGuan,

Thank you, thank you, and thank you! You have the spirit.

I look forward to reading your essay.

Don Limuti




Turil Sweden Cronburg wrote on May. 5, 2014 @ 14:18 GMT
I envision a trend that has been getting more and more popular with young and rebellious folks, of creating open-ended work~play~education spaces that welcome all ages, types, and interests of humans (and others!). Everything from free-schools, to unschooling programs, to hacker spaces, even to very traditional libraries and museums are creating a sort of bottom-up educational system where everyone is encouraged to explore life, the universe, and everything in all its diversity, from multiple perspectives, and use what folks find in solving our shared problems. In other words, I think we're evolving a healthy, natural, emergent way of discovering and sharing information that will surpass the more rigid, artificial, and top-down approaches of mainstream schools.

I'm currently looking to create one of these kinds of spaces. And I see others creating them as well (some of which I've participated in) which gives me much hope, since a well informed public is truly the best solution to our challenges as a species and planet.

report post as inappropriate

Anonymous replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 20:04 GMT
Hi Turil,

Your concept of: open-ended work~play~education spaces that welcome all ages, types, and interests of humans (and others!) is certainly worthwhile. I would like to see it as part of what is supported by an education mandate along with more formal education structures. Perhaps you intend that the open ended system should not be supported by any formal organization in that this would stifle the creative process. There is always this option, at least in an open society. What form of education is better or more productive... I do not know. We should be scientists and investigate many alternatives.

I assume "others" means elephants and donkeys :)

Thanks for visiting,

Don Limuti

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 20:09 GMT
Hi Turil,

The weblogic that controls this blog is very strange. It seems that many people cannot rate my essay, and the logoff times vary enough to make author posts iffy. Here is the post again.

Your concept of: open-ended work~play~education spaces that welcome all ages, types, and interests of humans (and others!) is certainly worthwhile. I would like to see it as part of what is supported by an education mandate along with more formal education structures. Perhaps you intend that the open ended system should not be supported by any formal organization in that this would stifle the creative process. There is always this option, at least in an open society. What form of education is better or more productive... I do not know. We should be scientists and investigate many alternatives.

I assume "others" means elephants and donkeys :)

Thanks for visiting,

Don Limuti




Joe Fisher wrote on May. 6, 2014 @ 16:07 GMT
Dear Mr. Limuti,

Your abstractions filled essay was the most entertaining one so far published, and I do hope that it does well in the competition. I do have one minor quibble about it that I hope you do not mind me mentioning.

Reality is unique, once. Reality is not taught in any school in the world. Every school only teaches erroneous abstractions such as mathematics and physics theories. As you will learn if you read my essay REALITY, ONCE, Bertrand Russell thought up a perfect abstraction 1+1=2, but reality ain’t perfect and his abstract assertion was pragmatically incorrect. As you will learn if you read my Theory of Inert Light that I have posted in the comment box of the Peter Jackson essay, Albert Einstein was wrong about the speed of light, and he was even more incorrect when he falsely stated that imaginary observers had the ability to see.

Why would I give up my monthly Social Security check to spend my time attempting to swallow lying propaganda in a school just because I will be paid for doing so? Do you think I have no morals Mr. Limuti?

Regards,

Joe Fisher

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 8, 2014 @ 05:54 GMT
Hi Joe,

Thanks for commenting on my essay. I always enjoy your essays and this one is no exception.

I even believe that you were real once......just long enough to sign up for social security.

All the best,

Don Limuti,



Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 20:23 GMT
Hi again Joe,

I wanted to add that I too am frustrated with the current education system. I was considering graduate school to get a degree in physics. I decided against this because it would put me in a position of having to agree to concepts about quantum mechanics that I knew to be incorrect.

Lying propaganda may be a little strong, but not far from the mark. I would like that you could keep your morals and not fear that school would destroy them.

Peer review is basically a good idea, but it has its limits that are best described by Mark Twain. What we know for sure that just ain't so is what gets us into trouble.

Thanks for visiting and best of luck,

Don Limuti




Peter Jackson wrote on May. 7, 2014 @ 10:08 GMT
Don,

You've surpassed you usual high standard, and you subject is close to my heart and I think far more important than we assume. I'm pleased you do it justice. I also think we use the on board quantum computers we've evolved very poorly and a root and branch change to teach us how to take proper advantage is long overdue. The question of when to rely on instant front cerebral cortex response and when to use out lobes it critical. Ensuring our left/right sides work in unison also takes training.

I see the issues in practice. My own essay derives 'quantum' predictions with a classical mechanism (geometrical) and represents a self apparent major leap forward towards unification, with wide ramifications. However most are 'scared' of QM as it seems acausal, and those who've leant it are thoroughly indoctrinated that it IS acausal, so reject logic! Such is the human condition. I think it's worth top marks for identifying what's probably the most important plan of action for human advancement. My own is written for the average SciAm reader to understand, subliminally suggests the power of non Earthcentric thinking, and even has a touch of romance! I'm sure you'll like and understand it, but please confirm and flag up any tricky bits.

Very best of luck in the results.

Peter

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 20:40 GMT
Hi Peter,

Or should I say Hi Jedi prince. I look forward to reading your essay.

Thanks for the kind remarks.

Don Limuti



Peter Jackson replied on May. 30, 2014 @ 18:08 GMT
Don,

May the force be with you. I'm just using my powers to elevate you.

And not only free but far BETTER education for all, not just cramming with doctrine but learning how to use our brains better.

Best of luck

Peter

report post as inappropriate


Hoang cao Hai wrote on May. 9, 2014 @ 01:38 GMT
Dear Author Don Limuti

Very practical - Education are always and forever remained the most important issues for the future - the result of it is the principal interest when we retired .

Therefore, in my opinion, if minimizing the training fee, we will gain maximum profit in the future - because : if a person have to invest too large for learning then will always try to take back when mature, and certainly will not be generous in the future.

10 points for education goals of your - Hải.CaoHoàng

report post as inappropriate

Hoang cao Hai replied on May. 9, 2014 @ 01:44 GMT
Looks like there has been a breakdown in the assessment grading so I can not give point for you ?

report post as inappropriate

Peter Jackson replied on May. 9, 2014 @ 14:48 GMT
Hoang,

I had a message from Brendan this morning confirming it's been fixed. It's worked for me, though I haven't tried on this one yet yet. If your's doesn't, contact Brendan on the essay competition blog or direct.

Peter

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 20:44 GMT
Hi Hoang,

Yes, that is what I am after.... maximum profit for the future. My frustration is that I cannot make it an ironclad argument that is obvious to all.

Thank you, and I look forward to reading your essay.

Don Limuti




Tommy Anderberg wrote on May. 11, 2014 @ 22:08 GMT
The premise of this essay is presented in admirably concise form: "what creates! the best capital? Answer: An educated populace."

The supporting evidence, however, strikes me as somewhat lacking:

1) A web page listing seven reasons why education is supposed to be important. The first four reasons given are backed up by correlations, not causations: the positive outcomes could easily...

view entire post


report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 21:23 GMT
Hi Tommy,

You caught me! I did my best but logically cannot nail down to everyones satisfaction the importance of education. All my logic and intuition says that the continuing education of all people should be top priority. The elitist school systems of the UK are second rate to the more inclusive university systems of the US. Unfortunately the US is trying more and more to imitate the UK.

Here is my response to your web links:

1. Where has all the education gone?

YOU FORGOT TO MENTION THE SEVERAL IMPORTANT CAVEATS THAT PRITCHETT LISTS

2. Does Education Matter:

The conclusion of this devastating book is that a large proportion of the billions poured into vocational training and university provision might be better spent on teaching the basics at primary school.

YES, EDUCATION DOES MATTER.

3. Going Broke by Degree:

THIS LOGICAL ANALYSIS SHOWS THAT THE THE RETURN ON INVESTMENT IN A COLLEGE DEGREE IS NOT WORTH IT FROM AN INDIVIDUAL ECONOMIC VIEWPOINT. YES, SPENDING $400,000 ON A DEGREE IN ART DURING THE JURASSIC PERIOD MAY NOT GIVE A MONETARY RETURN. STATISTICS CAN BE STUPID.

Perhaps we are both making a case for what we intuitively believe is the truth. I like mine better.

Thanks for visiting and best of luck,

Don Limuti



Tommy Anderberg replied on May. 19, 2014 @ 19:42 GMT
True, statistics can be stupid. I think I can produce a logical argument though:

Let f_e be the fraction of the economy dedicated to education. If it's 0, nobody gets any education, and there is not much of an economy. If it's 1, everybody is either learning or teaching; nobody is producing necessities like food, so everybody starves to death, and the economy eventually shrinks to zero. Clearly then, the optimal f_e for growth is something larger than 0 and smaller than 1.

So the veracity of "more education is good" depends on whether f_e is still below or already above that optimal value. It may be true in a developing country with very low levels of educational spending and false in a developed country which already produces more college graduates than there is demand for.

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 18:46 GMT
Hi Tommy,

I missed your post so my response is a little late ...sorry.

Your analysis is exactly correct. I never meant to imply that if a little education is good, then more is better.

My intent is to make the private sector robust. I also have no problem with people getting rich ethically. The education payment I envision is the new minimum wage that everyone is entitled to. The vast majority of people would desire to be in the private sector to make more than the minimum wage and to utilize there abilities and to peruse their dreams. the education payment is a fallback position with the advantage that it is a true capital producer.

I have expressed it before, the Scott's had it made, they invented the modern enlightenment that the founders of the US tried to follow (see the book "How the Scott's Invented the Modern World"). What the Scott's failed to do was to realize that their new revolutionary education system needed to be protected from the capitalist system (that they also invented).

I personally was very glad to graduate so I could do something "real". Education makes a great launchpad for other endeavors. My thesis is not if a little education is good more is better. My thesis is that education needs to be given a protected position because it is the true foundation of capital (value for the future).

Thanks for giving me the opportunity to express this,

Don Limuti




James Lee Hoover wrote on May. 13, 2014 @ 02:25 GMT
Judy,

A brave subject to broach. I wonder if the most important question you pose is who decides in you abstract: the criteria, the goals, and termination, for example. Eugenics, I see as only one consideration in steering the future. The big considerations, I see, are how we determine who steers, what the goal is and how we get there.

My essay has solutions but not necessarily how to get there.

Jim

report post as inappropriate


Hoang cao Hai wrote on May. 14, 2014 @ 02:02 GMT
Incidents in my evaluation had to be overcome, 10 points to cheer for your passion.

Hải.CaoHoàng

report post as inappropriate


James Lee Hoover wrote on May. 14, 2014 @ 21:22 GMT
Don,

For most part I agree with you. The best educated populace is certainly the answer to many failings of our system. Better educated citizens vote intelligently and don't allow opportunistic slugs to lead us and don't allow the economic system to award personhood to the most powerful corporations, thus assuring the majority is trumped in all decisionmaking. The educated can provide an informed consensus in guiding our future and can build scientific solutions to do it greener.

My only disagreement is that teaching methods, technologies should not be market driven, but do agree that commitment and monetary support of education needs to be removed from the "invisible hand." I not sure what you mean by the former but you probably see that the latter has been driven by sterile investors who want to make money by privatizing education. It has been a failure.

Like you, I see education as a vital investment in people, who are the lifeblood of our future.

Jim

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 21:46 GMT
Hi Jim,

Good to see you in the contest. What I mean by market driven when it comes to what is offered in education, is that the government does not have a monopoly on deciding what is important. What is educationally offered is what is desired by individuals.... if enough individuals want a course of study it will be offered. Many will make choices that they believe will enhance their economic potential and give them credentials. Others many take courses to improve their health. Others may want to improve their gaming and collaboration skills. Still others may want to organize against corporation dominance in election politics. Others will work on making the earth a sustainable place to live. Others may want to study consciousness, philosophy, religion, physics etc, etc.

Market driven is not necessarily a negative concept. People driven may be a better nomenclature.

Look forward to reading your essay,

Don Limuti



James Lee Hoover replied on May. 23, 2014 @ 23:51 GMT
Don,

You do have a point regarding the "common core" requirements imposed by the Obama administration, encouraging a test-based curriculum. Many parents are taking exception -- progressive and conservative.

Have you had a chance to read my essay? It does run on similar lines as yours with emphasis of utilizing untapped, imaginative brain power as my "within" and going "beyond" the conventional.

Jim

report post as inappropriate


Member Marc Séguin wrote on May. 15, 2014 @ 23:54 GMT
Don,

I have now rated your essay! Good luck!

As I mentioned in my earlier post, I think it is important to motivate people to invest time in their education, and I like your proposal to pay students. You write

The recipient need not sign up for classes, but must be enrolled in a school to get a check.

You take a "no pressure" approach, but can it be effective? Would most people just enroll with no real intention to actually learn anything in the process?

Marc

report post as inappropriate

Anonymous replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 22:38 GMT
Hi Marc,

Thanks for visiting and voting.

Your question: "Would most people just enroll with no real intention to actually learn anything in the process?" Is the most to the point question.

Yes, I believe people will just enroll to get the check. If a person has medical issues and is in a hospice, there is nothing wrong with getting the check. But we have given them the right to play the education game for as long as they can.

If a family is in dire straits and homeless, they may just take the check buy food and worry....but the option of taking classes for free is there.

If a young person wants to race cars, they may just take the check and buy a computerized suspension, but the path is open to learn about computerized suspensions and collaborate with others perhaps to start a business.

If a person is interested in criminal activity then they could take the check and proceed to do their criminal thing and suffer the usually bad consequences (and loose the education mandate), but a door is open that has never been open before, to use their energy to get a better outlook on life via education.

Most people would see the advantage of a new pain free (high quality) education system and feel grateful to use the skills and new friends to build a very prosperous future.

Thanks again, and I look forward to reading your essay,

Don Limuti

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 22:45 GMT
Marc, the logout demon caught me again, Don Limuti




Michael muteru wrote on May. 16, 2014 @ 13:30 GMT
don

Education does not come in tots or even gallons-education is imeasurable and should impart knowledge .Education is key to alleviating all our problems for we better uniderstand our environment.Nice essay there alt of wise words to quote.I also have something to add in my essay LIVING IN THE SHADOWS OF THE SUN: REALITIES, PERILS ESCAPADES MAN, PLANET AND KARDASHEV SCALE.MAKING THE GREAT TRANSITION by Michael muteru on the weblink http://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/2101.kindly take your precious time to rate/review the essay .all the best

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 16, 2014 @ 22:50 GMT
Hi Michael,

Thanks for visiting and your support. I look forward to reading your essay.

Don Limuti




Wilhelmus de Wilde wrote on May. 19, 2014 @ 14:41 GMT
Dear Don,

Thank you for your stimulating post on my thread.

I herwith sent you my latest article meant for cosmology but it is still in preview.

wilhelmus

report post as inappropriate

Wilhelmus de Wilde replied on May. 19, 2014 @ 14:49 GMT
Sorry it seems to be more as 1 mb, so if you communicate your e-mail I will sent it there.

wilhelmus

report post as inappropriate

Wilhelmus de Wilde replied on May. 19, 2014 @ 14:51 GMT
ps I will read and rate your participation tomorrow...

report post as inappropriate


Christian Corda wrote on May. 19, 2014 @ 21:02 GMT
Hi Don,

Nice to re-meet you in this new FQXi Contest. I have read your original and beautiful Essay. Here are my comments:

1) Sadly, the problem of shifting of priorities away from education is not only in USA, but in other various countries, starting from my Italy.

2) I suspect that point 1) is due to the issue that for governs is simpler to dominate an ignorant populace instead of an educated populace. If I am correct, the problem 1) is even worst.

3) It is fundamental that education methods must be subject to individual choice. The alternative should be having a populace made of servants instead of a free and educated populace.

4) Free public education will also permit people to construct a better life and to improve the social security for themselves also for when they will become elders. Thus, I agree that the higher priority is education.

5) Not only in USA the word public as a preface for a community wide service has turned into a dirty word. I assure you that,sadly, in Italy the situation is even worst.

6) The Gaming example is important also from another point of view, which concerns the value of playing in education and in science in particular. Playing is the main reason for which I work like a researcher. In general, it is very difficult for scientists becoming rich people, but they have the good luck to play in all their life! I think that it is important to teach youngest children, starting from childhood, that science is playing. That is the best way to initiate them to science. I were lucky from this point of you as I had a teacher in my elementary school who initiated me to science in that way.

In any case, you wrote a nice Essay, which enjoyed me. Thus, I am going to give you an high score.

I hope you will have the time to read my Essay.

I wish you best luck in the contest.

Cheers,

Ch.

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 21, 2014 @ 20:12 GMT
Hi Christian,

Good to see you in another contest.

This essay was the toughest essay to write. The subject is close to my heart, and I felt I did a very incomplete job. Your support is very welcome.

You work makes the complex accessible to all. I think there is magic in it that will steer the future.

All the best,

Don Limuti




John Brodix Merryman wrote on May. 20, 2014 @ 03:25 GMT
Don,

A spot on and logically focused article. I've been castigating various entrants for their 'out in space' entries and so it is nice to have such a well centered and reasonable one. I think though, that the possibility exists to be far more radical than you might think possible. Significant change is only possible when the old order breaks down, but right now the current status quo is...

view entire post


report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 21, 2014 @ 21:59 GMT
Hi John,

I carry a basic model of economics that I wish would disappear. It goes like this:

In Chinese history there has been a succession of dynasties. Each dynasty starts with a uniform distribution of wealth (land). As the dynasty progresses the land ownership gets concentrated and society revolts and establishes a new dynasty which proceeds to concentrate wealth into a few hands, and another revolution and dynasty emerge etc, etc.

I do not address this in my essay, but would hope an educated populace could.

Appreciate you introducing economics into the mix of essays.

Thanks,

Don Limuti




Jonathan J. Dickau wrote on May. 21, 2014 @ 04:15 GMT
Thanks Don,

A refreshingly brief and easy to read entry, but also leaving me wishing you had said more - because you were on a roll. You deal well with the essay question, and with the questions that arise from your solution. I like the idea of being paid to go to school and learn. Your practical approach explains how universal education helps to bring about a free lunch, and answers some of the questions raised when I read Leo KoGuan's essay, which emphasizes some of the same themes.

Overall, a very excellent offering. It is fun to read and gives real answers, but as you say not easily accepted by all. Of course; any formula can be tweaked, but one needs to start somewhere - and you offer a good start.

All the Best,

Jonathan

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 21, 2014 @ 22:30 GMT
Hi Jonathan,

I actually did say more, the essay was about 9 pages, I truncated it to 5 pages.

I said more about how to pay for my plan. My thesis was that education funding needed to be protected from the free market system. However, the banking system should be fully part of the free market system. The federal reserve system is protected and sacrosanct. Why? Because only a few "geniuses" have the ability to direct this most sophisticated of banking systems. We need to bow down to these experts and be grateful because no one else can do the job.

To bring banking (the printing of money) into the free market system, I proposed allowing all the states to establish their own federal reserve systems. Now there could be competing systems and ideas. Ben Bernanke can lead one state, Paul Krugman can lead another, Peter Schiff and lead another. Everyone can watch and see how the states are doing. My thought is that what works would be noted and followed by the various states. And as always the federal government would be the watchdog and insurance against failure. I postulated that the economic advantage of this system would pay for the education mandate.

I just did not have the confidence I need to present this idea. I passed this idea onto a friend, she said the states would have a race to see how fast they could get to the bottom. She was politically savvy and I caved. I was over my head.

Apologies,

Super to be with you in another contest and I look forward to reading your entry,

Don Limuti




Thomas Howard Ray wrote on May. 21, 2014 @ 12:40 GMT
Don,

I could quibble about how to implement it -- though I won't -- because I agree wholeheartedly with your premise that lifelong free education is the key to producing more capital, since human capital is our most valuable resource.

Great job, high score from me, and thanks for commenting in my forum!

Best,

Tom

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 21, 2014 @ 21:49 GMT
Hi Tom,

You are correct to think about quibbling. I actually oscillated quite a bit about how I want to pay for my educationally enabling dreams. I actually think in the long run a continuing education system that pays people to participate can pay for itself (yes, the devil in in the details). But for the short term it will need an economic boost. I confess my sin of omission to Jonathan, in the proceeding post.

Thanks for coming by,

You know I think you proposal for the future is practical and important.

Wishing you the best,

Don Limuti




Turil Sweden Cronburg wrote on May. 22, 2014 @ 14:57 GMT
By the way Don, I realized that my own idea for paying folks to participate in community-problem-solving work~school programs was in my book, and it's similar to your ideas in your essay. Though now I think it's best to just skip the gamification idea, and simply focus all our resources on directly supporting people's needs, rather than using an arbitrary quantification system such as money. But I still think that high quality education for everyone who wants it is the key to solving our shared problems.

report post as inappropriate

Anonymous replied on May. 22, 2014 @ 19:51 GMT
Hi Turil,

First I want you to know that the earth dating game (where extra terrestrial civilizations bid to mate with earth) is my idea. I realize that this is similar to ideas expressed in your essay, but I assure you that my idea is, how should I say ... much more sexy :)

Gamification is controversial, but I am going to line up with the ideas of Jane McGonigal as expressed in her book "Reality is Broken". It may be an oversimplification but I think our children are leading us into the future.

I realize that in your bottom up approach, money and economics is a secondary issue and just gets in the way. I am very intentional about funding. I want nations to realize that just as they can organize to "always" find money for military actions to protect their citizens from outside aggression, they can also organize to find money for the support of education to protect their nations future.

You have the advantage at present in that you are practicing what you preach... Bravo

Don Limuti

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 22, 2014 @ 19:54 GMT
I wonder if I changed my name to Anonymous, this problem would go away!




Robert de Neufville wrote on May. 22, 2014 @ 19:04 GMT
Don,

I tried posting a comment last night, but it seems to have disappeared after the site went down. My apologies if my comment ends up posting twice!

I wholeheartedly agree that we need to provide more education. Paying people to go to school seems like an excellent idea. My own view is that the higher levels of education need to be more like an apprenticeship, in which the paying job of going to school is increasingly mixed with the practice of the profession.

Spending on education certainly seems like an investment that's well worth making. But I don't quite see how paying the poor, unemployed, and the elderly to go to school would save money. It seems like paying them and providing them with an education would actually cost a lot more than simply giving them the social support money we do now—but maybe I'm misunderstanding your proposal?

Good luck in the contest in any case!

Best,

Robert de Neufville

report post as inappropriate

Anonymous replied on May. 24, 2014 @ 20:29 GMT
Hi Robert,

I am also having trouble with interfacing to the FQXi website. About three days ago I spent about half a day sending and resending replies that went off into the ether.... It is a FQXi quantum physics phenomena.

Your inquiry: "But I don't quite see how paying the poor, unemployed, and the elderly to go to school would save money."

OK you got me being glib, here is my reasoning:

1. You could also look at my education proposal as getting rid of the welfare system, the unemployment system, and the social security system. Big Big Savings in administration.

2. These savings in my estimation will actually pay for the schooling of the poor, unemployed, and the elderly.

3. In addition we may get innovative contributions from these groups helping to resolve the problems of the future.

There is a very interesting book "How the Scotts Invented the Modern World". The case is made that the Scotts (a tiny country were first in having a literate society and that they then went on to establish "the enlightenment" in economics and science and health. Then they joined the UK and started watching "Downton Abbey" and it was downhill from there. They started admiring the class system and forgetting about how they became great. I believe if they had realized how they became world leaders they would have made sure "education for everyone" stayed a top priority.

Thanks for visiting,

Don Limuti

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 24, 2014 @ 20:32 GMT
Anonymously yours,




John Brodix Merryman wrote on May. 23, 2014 @ 02:17 GMT
Don,

That was odd. Jonathan posted a note about how they were changing servers, but even that disappeared.

http://ellenbrown.com/

http://publicbankinginstitute.org/

http://publicbankinginstitute.org/

http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/the-world-according-to-moder
n-monetary-theory/


The problem is the powers that be prefer not to advertise alternatives to their model.

Here are some of my normal go to for news sites;;

http://warincontext.org/

http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/

http://www.zerohedge.com/

Regards,

John

Saving my posts, so if they disappear....

report post as inappropriate

John Brodix Merryman replied on May. 23, 2014 @ 02:20 GMT
That second PBI was supposed to be http://michael-hudson.com/

j

report post as inappropriate

Anonymous replied on May. 24, 2014 @ 19:16 GMT
Hi John,

I very much appreciate the information you sent on what is happening in banking. It seems that what I would like to see happening is making an appearance.

I liked very much your essay, one of the few that highlights economics and economics education.

Here is an idea: You and T. Ray should collaborate on an economics book. It would be one giant step for education.

Thanks,

Don Limuti

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 24, 2014 @ 19:19 GMT
Anonymous is me.




Ajay Bhatla wrote on May. 23, 2014 @ 19:12 GMT
Don,

You say that "Education really is the underpinning of the free enterprise system" and you are right. I would go a lot further: education is the underpinning of all aspects of our lives, especially those we desire to influence. Your point about the "shifting of priorities away from education" because of demographic blocks is an idea I have not considered before. Thanks for surfacing this point.

In my essay (here) I don't specifically address education as a separate concept but consider each person to be educated differently from any other person with the differences coming from life experiences rather than just formal, public or private, schooling.

Would you agree that experience is also a valuable avenue for and source of being better educated?

-- Ajay

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 24, 2014 @ 06:09 GMT
Hi Ajay,

Yes, I agree that experience is a valuable source of education.

1. Apprenticeship, Benjamin Franklin learned the printing trade from his brother.

2. Many parents provide enriching experiences for their children, museums, planetariums, camps etc.

These are less appreciated but important education methods.

Thanks for your comment and best of luck,

Donald Limuti




Cristinel Stoica wrote on May. 26, 2014 @ 12:54 GMT
Dear Don,

I liked reading your essay. Your stile is concise and direct, and are right when you say that an educated population is the best capital. Your essay also contains concrete proposals, and addresses possible counter-arguments that may be raised by the reader. I wish you good luck with this very well written essay!

Best regards,

Cristi

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 17:49 GMT
Hi Cristi,

Thanks for visiting my page with you generous comments.

Speaking of pages we are on the same one, your comment: "freedom has to be protected by access to information, education, transparency and critical thinking". Your essay is excellent. I just concentrated on the education part.

Don Limuti




Gyenge Valeria wrote on May. 26, 2014 @ 16:52 GMT
Dear Don!

I read your well-conceived essay with interest.

I'm a Hungarian citizen so there are points in your essay mainly mentioning those in "What is happening .." section and to which concepts you established some of your given possible resolutions in the following sections, I'm not competent even either to deem those.

I've read much good and many essays' author here are...

view entire post


report post as inappropriate

Anonymous replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 20:51 GMT
Dear Valeria,

First, I replied to your most interesting and important essay some time ago, and I swapped your last and first names. Some times the obvious escapes me... apologies.

Thanks for visiting my blog. If I may rephrase your thesis: Before we start steering toward the future we should know what thoughts are and how they can be generated and directed by unethical others. I...

view entire post


report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 20:55 GMT
I am A Non E Mouse



Gyenge Valeria replied on May. 27, 2014 @ 17:52 GMT
Dear Don!

"I swapped your last and first names.."- No problem. I advisedly wished to use it here in its originality.

Your rephrasing my thesis in its sum-up quite correct. I couldn't be better :))

I can agree with you regarding to the necessity of the proper eduction is an unmitigated good. However as I guessed in my above comment to you - Who should think what and why...

view entire post


report post as inappropriate


Vladimir F. Tamari wrote on May. 28, 2014 @ 03:43 GMT
Don

You make excellent suggestions and interesting comments. I have been privileged in having an excellent 'American' education in elementary and high school and at university. I put in the quotes because this was in Palestine and Lebanon. The American teachers were dedicated, generous and supportive, and respected local culture and needs. I feel sad about reports concerning the deterioration of public education in the US itself, but of course things are changing, for example the Internet - as you have mentioned.

Education per se is necessary, but it is not a panacea for the world's ills...an educated person could be as greedy, narrow-minded and destructive as a like-minded ignoramus. Traditional religions have been the keepers of moral and ethical teaching, but these have to be supplanted by teaching them in ordinary schools.

Best wishes, Vladimir

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 28, 2014 @ 04:13 GMT
Hi Vladimir,

Thanks for visiting. I agree completely with you second paragraph. and I do remember Abraham Lincoln's admonishment (with a little twist): Let us pray that an educated populace makes right.

BTW, thanks for giving the feedback on American schools in Palestine and Lebanon. Sometimes I get the feeling Americans (me) are bozos everywhere outside the US.

Thanks for your essay and best of luck,

Don Limuti




Member Daniel Dewey wrote on May. 28, 2014 @ 18:26 GMT
Hi Don,

Interesting essay! Quite different from the others I've read. It seems to me that your priorities are about right. I hope you are able to find a good way to figure out whether your proposals would work.

Best,

Daniel

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 28, 2014 @ 22:04 GMT
Hi Daniel,

Thanks for visiting and for your encouragement.

My worst fear is that someone will approach me with some bucks and say OK kid go to it! My only hope would be to find a potent administrator ... I am thinking of Ben Franklin. Franklin would address congress and say "guys, this universal education idea, is the best thing to come along... do not let it slip away."

Wishing you much success,

Don Limuti




Author Don Limuti wrote on May. 28, 2014 @ 22:18 GMT
Praise for FQXi.org

Thank you Brendan, Kavita and Tom and everyone at FQXi.org

Nothing like your essay contests exist in the universe. They are messy, complex, frustrating, and nobody in their right mind would attempt such a thing. You deserve much credit for creating this open forum for ideas.

Don Limuti




Member Tejinder Pal Singh wrote on May. 29, 2014 @ 05:22 GMT
Dear Don,

I think you have a brilliant idea and I could not agree more. Free high quality education will indeed go a very long way. You have raised a deep question: why should youngsters have to pay to be educated?! A country like India with a very high illiteracy rate could benefit greatly from such a rethink. The free education that is available in India is of a quality so dismal that it is of little good. And where the education is good, we pay steeply, very steeply. A perfect recipe for creating undesirable classifications in society.

Regards,

Tejinder

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on May. 29, 2014 @ 09:39 GMT
Dear Tejinder,

It is good to be in another contest with you. I appreciate your supportive comments.

I have noted that your own essay supports improving the quality of the human thought process, historically one of India's continuing contributions to the world.

Thanks,

Don Limuti




Author Don Limuti wrote on May. 29, 2014 @ 20:28 GMT
Dear Readers of this Blog,

There is an essay I would like you to consider: Steering Humanity's Future with the Dialogic Web by Ray Luechtefeld

This essay is rated high enough to be considered a finalist, but it only has 9 votes. My fear is that it will be disqualified because of not enough votes. So, take a look and vote as you feel appropriate.

A public service provided by, Don Limuti




Denis Frith wrote on Jun. 2, 2014 @ 06:17 GMT
Don

Education requires much more than the knowledge of teachers. It is very dependent on the goods and services (electricity, transportation, electronic devices, etc.) provided by the infrastructure (as I describe in my essay). Humanity has to steer the future use of this aging infrastructure if the young are to be giving a sound education.

A sound education is a necessary, but not sufficient condition, for society to cope with the continuing decline in the natural resources need by the infrastructure.

Denis

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 2, 2014 @ 19:02 GMT
Hi Denis,

Thanks for visiting my blog. And your comment is well taken, education requires an infrastructure, and I did not address this at all. I wanted to but it was a bit too much to for one essay (and my abilities). So, I stayed with what I considered the more foundational issue of how we think about education. Is education just another commodity or is it the thing that makes advancements in civilization (as well as commodities) possible.

Making education fundamental to a society is not without risk. I like this risk more than I like alternative ways to steer the future. One essay suggested brain implants for those others who just do not get how we should steer the future. This top down approach reminiscent of fascism and communism seems to be still in fashion. I think we can do better. And we should create the infrastructure to do better (IMHO).

Look forward to reading your essay,

Don Limuti




Janko Kokosar wrote on Jun. 2, 2014 @ 14:56 GMT
Dear Don Limuti

I also think that education is very important and it is necessary to introduce pilot projects for searching the most effective learning. About one successful education project is also written by Mohammed Khalil on this FQXi contest. About physics it is important that more effective methods of learning are constantly searched. For instance, my derivation of special relativity better visualizes special relativity than only the common derivation.

At the same time the education should be a global process, inexpensive for users, and adapted to the World Wide Web. It should be possible that it preserve a lot of time and money, which is used for transportation of children into schools.

One example of better education can be used at language discrimination. Namely, at publication of papers, native English speakers are at better position, because many papers are rejected with reason that English is poor. This means, that someone, who send 10 version of the paper, should 10 times pays an editor, what means a lot of money. One facility would be that the editor says, the contents is OK, but you should correct the language. (But they only reject because of language.) Besides, web pages for corrections of grammar can be much improved. It should exist something like google translate, only that it translate from English into (better) English. Like google translate, quality should be constantly improved. It should exist something like google search, only that it searches sentences also by sentence structure, for instance: "[Adjective] [subject] is [verb][object]". When we write on internet, it should exist an easy options that someone corrects grammar. Thus, a better global grammar softwares with inclusion of volunteers and modestly paid people should exist.

My essay

Best regards

Janko Kokosar

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 2, 2014 @ 19:19 GMT
Hi Janko,

Thanks for your comments:

1. Your point that "it is necessary to introduce pilot projects for searching the most effective learning" is very important. And I did not stress this enough.

2. I am going to revisit Mohammed essay.

3. Ray Luechtefeld has an essay that may address the language communication barrier, check it out. Perhaps this is a field you may enter and contribute to.

I am on my way to read your essay,

Don Limuti




Chidi Idika wrote on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 08:51 GMT
Hi Don,

Just to say I'll appreciate your FRANK comment and voting on my perhaps unconventional thesis.

Best,

Chidi

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 5, 2014 @ 03:27 GMT
Hi Chidi,

I did read your excellent essay and replied on your thread.

Don Limuti




Thomas Howard Ray wrote on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 22:14 GMT
Hi Don,

You had mentioned in my forum that you would like to see a more graphic presentation of the ideas. I think this recently published paper might help meet that requirement.

All best,

Tom

report post as inappropriate


Author Don Limuti wrote on Jun. 4, 2014 @ 20:16 GMT
Thanks Tom,

I like the paper and the model. I also ordered the Bar-Yam book. Augmenting the human intellect is the way to go.

Thanks,

Don Limuti




Luca Valeri wrote on Jun. 5, 2014 @ 15:29 GMT
Hi Don,

I liked your comment on Martenson in the main forum site of this contest. So I wanted to read your essay and as expected a great essay.

Also here in Switzerland they increased the tuition fee for going to the university. This would not be such a problem if it would be accompanied by an easier access to scholarships. A far more worse problem is that you have to finish your studies in a certain restricted time, which makes it impossible anymore to study with a par time job or a family.

In your comment to Chidis essay you say your 'with Einstein'. In my essay I am with Bohr, although I believe one has to respond to Einsteins concerns with the Copenhagen interpretation of QM. I look forward to read your previous contest essay.

Regards,

Luca

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 5, 2014 @ 20:35 GMT
Hi Luca,

Thanks for visiting. My alma mater CCNY was world class in producing Nobel laureates .... then it started charging tuition! Christian C. and yourself say that something similar is happening in Italy and Switzerland respectively. Making education expensive strikes me as foolish as killing the milk cow. I believe the nations of the world can do better.

I enjoyed your essay very much, and I believe we are further together than Einstein and Bohr.

Thanks,

Don limuti




Chidi Idika wrote on Jun. 6, 2014 @ 04:16 GMT
Dear Don,

Many thanks for your useful comment at my end. I always look forward to your balance of thought. Also thank you for your frankness at Sabinne's!

Wishing you the best.

Chidi

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 6, 2014 @ 05:10 GMT
Thanks Chidi, I appreciate the support very much, Don Limuti




Lorraine Ford wrote on Jun. 6, 2014 @ 14:03 GMT
Hi Don,

When I read your essay, I thought of the girls of Pakistan, and how threatened the Taliban are by educated girls. I like this quote from your UN website reference: "Education is not only a right but a passport to human development. It opens doors and expands opportunities and freedoms. It contributes to fostering peace, democracy and economic growth as well as improving health and reducing poverty. The ultimate aim of Education for All (EFA) is sustainable development. "

But even in wealthier countries, I think that democracy doesn't just survive automatically - it needs an educated populace to continue to thrive. I agree with your implication that education should not be turned into a business, because I think that the goal of educating is likely to clash with the goal of making money.

I certainly agree with you that a "foundational inclusive education" is essential, and that ways must be found to make it more possible, interesting and fun - even if it means paying people to go to school.

Cheers,

Lorraine

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 6, 2014 @ 19:30 GMT
Hi Lorraine,

Your comments are very much appreciated, and I wish I had included them in my essay. I also wish I had done a better job in bring out that the value of education is not intuitive. To the Taliban education is a cost that is not seen as producing value (for men and especially women). Especially women, because the women in Taliban society are essentially slaves, and to the...

view entire post





Neil Bates wrote on Jun. 6, 2014 @ 23:54 GMT
Don,

As an educator and pro-education political activist, I agree that education is very important. I also affirm that it should not just be focused on young people. Education "for the future" needs to be a life-long process and makes for better citizens beyond the basic need to keep up with working skills. However, consider the enormous (?) resources required to provide the hours of education for the many people getting some sort of assistance, especially social security. I think we could at least distinguish the "welfare" part from the SS that is granted after a certain age and that everyone pays into to some extent.

Plus, I'm not sure that just "more training" will actually translate into better-paid employees. It seems that companies are trying to get by through fewer work hours, period. That's why I propose to directly incentivize them through a tax plan that counts pay to workers as some multiple, like 1.2x, of actual cost to count as an expense deduction. So perhaps we can combine a milder form of your ideas with Marc Séguin's "Futurocentric" education (i.e., reforming the content as well to be more directly geared to preparing for the future), to better prepare the citizens for the rolling onslaught of the future at all ages, and especially to those finding it difficult to take advantage of those currents.

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 7, 2014 @ 05:02 GMT
Hi Neil,

Your 1.2x concept as I mentioned on your blog is the best idea for getting the US and other economies back to something resembling full employment quickly. I did not need to read anything else to give you the highest mark.

I will quibble just a bit, and I hate to do it because we are both after creating a better world via education.

My point is that we need to do more than improve education we need to protect it from the market system, the same as we protect the military from the market system. The reason we need to do this is because education really is the source of all capital, let me say that again (EDUCATION IS THE SOURCE OF ALL CAPITAL) it is not just another commodity. As long as we keep education a commodity we will be crippling the nations of the world. As I explained in the post to Lorraine above, this fact about education is not intuitive.

Your point: "enormous (?) resources are required to provide the hours of education for the many people getting some sort of assistance, especially social security." Answer: This enormous resource is a small fraction of military spending.

Marc's futuro-centric idea is good but which dictator is going to decide which way to steer, the more the content of education looks like a free market the better.

As Joe Fisher indicates, this theory is just another "abstraction distraction disease". If so, it is a disease we should investigate. And if warranted, we should try to catch it.

Thanks for your fine essay Neil,

Best wishes in the contest,

Don Limuti




Christine Cordula Dantas wrote on Jun. 9, 2014 @ 10:42 GMT
Dear Don,

I finally read your essay, and I hope it goes well in the contest! I highly agree with you that inclusive education is the way for a optimum, peaceful and advanced society. Congratulations for making this clear, with some concrete proposals. They are, evidently, open for discussion and improvement. Mankind needs freedom, not irresponsible freedom, but educated freedom. This is the only truthful freedom for conscious beings, I think.

Good luck in the contest!

Best,

Christine

report post as inappropriate

Author Don Limuti replied on Jun. 12, 2014 @ 18:05 GMT
Dear Christine,

I do think our essays are very complimentary, and they are appropriately side by side in the rankings.

I like your concept of Novelty, and wish I used it in my essay.

Your background is how shall I say ... very high tech, which is very much an understatement. I enjoy physics as an amature and have some novel ideas (crackpot is close to novel). You may find my astrophysics interesting, check out:

1. http://www.digitalwavetheory.com/DWT/21_Self-Gravity.html

2. http://www.digitalwavetheory.com/DWT/23_Gravity_Visualized.h
tml

3. http://www.digitalwavetheory.com/DWT/39_The_Schwarzschild_Ra
dius.html

Wishing you the best,

Don Limuti




Scarlet Kleen wrote on Feb. 6, 2017 @ 11:35 GMT
of course education matters but still being humane is what will save ourselves from self-destruction..we all know that at the moment money rule the world and in most cases educated and skillful people are those who are the richest..of course there are some who didn't graduate from a college but they are smart enough to open their own business and there are those who look for paper writing services and with their help graduate..both are educated but among all those are people who are ready t give up everything for the sake of another unrelated human being or for the sake of environment??doubt there are many.,that's why we should first teach our kids how to be human and only then we should teach them what might secure our future

report post as inappropriate


sasa diana sasa wrote on Apr. 25, 2017 @ 01:56 GMT
OBAT MAAG adalah obat yang paling manjur untuk mengobati stroke.OBAT MAAG herbal sekarang mulai dilirik lagi oleh masyarakat, karena OBAT MAAG herbal tidak memiliki efek samping yang berbahaya bagi tubuh. OBAT MAAG yang terbuat dari herbal mempunyai banyak manfaat, yaitu OBAT MAAG herbal sangat ampuh, OBAT MAAG herbal aman mengatasi stroke, OBAT MAAG tradisional bisa dikonsumsi oleh semua kalangan usia. itulah sebabnya OBAT MAAG herbal mulai dilirik lagi oleh masyarakat, karena OBAT MAAG herbal sudah terbukti ampuh OBAT MAAG herbal mulai dilirik lagi oleh masyarakat, karena OBAT MAAG herbal sudah terbukti ampuh mengatasi

report post as inappropriate


Login or create account to post reply or comment.

Please enter your e-mail address:
Note: Joining the FQXi mailing list does not give you a login account or constitute membership in the organization.