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Jonathan Dickau: on 6/7/14 at 2:59am UTC, wrote Interesting and excellent James.. A poignant reminder that sometimes our...

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FQXi FORUM
October 17, 2017

CATEGORY: How Should Humanity Steer the Future? Essay Contest (2014) [back]
TOPIC: Lead With Innate Knowledge by James A Putnam [refresh]
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Author James A Putnam wrote on Apr. 18, 2014 @ 16:03 GMT
Essay Abstract

The essay presents the author's view on a process for leading humanity. It discusses: How we learn; Innate knowledge; Emotions; Innate meanings; Human free will; and, Good leadership.

Author Bio

Author & owner of newphysicstheory.com: Peer reviewed paper #133 for ICCS 2011 The Nature of Thermodynamic Entropy; Invited speaker for COFE 2012 Calculating the Universal Gravitational Constant; COFE 2013 Origins of Force and Acceleration; Essay entries in each of the five previous contests.

Download Essay PDF File




Georgina Woodward wrote on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 04:07 GMT
The question is How should Humanity steer the future? You have given us a lesson on'how', through leadership and connection with innate knowledge that we 'feel', but no indication of destination or navigation.You wrote "Followers follow along because they are feeling along. Stir their emotions with words of caring and unity for both social and scientific goals. Care and unity are emotionally satisfying." That sounds like sage advice. I can hear the people saying "yes we are following , where are we going O leader?" That is to say I half wanted you to continue with where that manifesto might take us. What are the social and scientific goals you have in mind, or is it straight ahead business as usual? Best wishes, Georgina

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 06:32 GMT
Georgina,

I eliminated them. That is why my essay is five pages long. I reduced it from what began as 11 pages. I left only the beginning foundational part to the answer to the question: How should humanity steer the future? One answer might have been to not set up steering committees. I wrote a disapproving paragraph about where I think that practice leads us. I dumped it. It wasn't really...

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Georgina Woodward replied on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 11:17 GMT
James,

thanks for your reply. I wasn't implying that you hadn't answered the question because you have.In your own way, and all of the essays are unique. That what I meant by my first sentence. I think there is some ambiguity or openness in the question because it could be read as 'How?' as in how is steering to be accomplished or 'How?' as in which way / direction. I've gone more for which direction/s. Very different from my previous ones. Hopefully it is both entertaining and informative.

Georgina

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Thomas Howard Ray wrote on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 12:12 GMT
Hi James,

How much different would your essay have been if you had framed it with your last words:

"Care and unity are emotionally satisfying."

Rather than your first:

"We know a lot of knowledge, but yearn for more."?

All best wishes in the competition!

Tom

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 14:30 GMT
Tom,

I wouldn't start with care and unity because that would miss presenting their natural foundation. My essay is technical. All of its important points are raised before I encourage the use of caring and unity. The focus was kept on the foundational development of ideas including caring and unity. Examples appeared as part of presenting the development process. This wasn't an essay about presenting my ideas about caring and unity. I have already done that.

The purpose of the essay was to present the process of learning; and, the importance for those who would lead others to understand it. It was kept general so that reader's might keep their focus on the process that was being presented. Apparently you would have preferred reading about my personal conclusions so that you might correct them. We have already been through that. We don't agree.

I don't agree with your physics. I argue that it contains both errors and inventions. My basis for saying this here and now is to point out that your foundational ideas about physics lack unity right from the start. My ideas include unity right from the start. This essay wasn't intended for the purpose of repeating ourselves. I was presenting something else. I was presenting something that I expect you strongly disagree with. If so then we disagree again. I strongly agree with it.

James Putnam




Thomas Howard Ray wrote on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 15:35 GMT
James, I don't have any preference for what you should write. I merely imply that if knowledge is innate, as you claim, it is unified, and therefore it would be irrational to wish for more. So the foundation of that unified knowledge would be caring and unity at the beginning and the end, would it not?

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 19, 2014 @ 18:42 GMT
Tom,

(I merely imply that if knowledge is innate, as you claim, it is unified, ...)

That is not known. Innate means we were born with it. That is all it means. What the innate standards for caring and unity are have to be discovered. In the case of caring, I gave an example of how easily the innate meaning of that can be learned. It comes to our conscious mind with an emotional response that distinguishes it. With regard to unity, the matter is not so clear.

While I think that the innate meaning of unity includes recognizing that there is a single cause for all effects, I can't induce others to share that feeling. Multiple causes seem to be a good idea to many people. All of the results that I have presented in the past about physics problems are achieved from just one cause. The results and the idea of a single cause for physics, right from the start of its fundamentals, languish. Yet, the need to seek unity is prevalent.

The idea of unity is innate. But, I see efforts directed at adding unity onto physics as an afterthought. Sort of a theoretical ending for physics theory. I see that effort as faulty, but my point really has to do with the shared need to seek unity.

(...and therefore it would be irrational to wish for more.)

Makes no sense to me. The awareness of some knowledge is hardly emotionally satisfying.

(So the foundation of that unified knowledge would be caring and unity at the beginning and the end, would it not?)

There is no basis for a beginning and ending for knowledge. Knowledge exists in its entirety. Our learning process is one of discovering its existence. Different paths can be followed during that process. However, knowledge precedes the learning process. If that weren't the case, the process couldn't occur. All the signing among all of humanity is only directing us toward the discovery of and use of innate knowledge.

James Putnam




Author James A Putnam wrote on Apr. 20, 2014 @ 02:14 GMT
I wrote that theoretical physics lacks unity. The efforts to add on unity as if it were an afterthought require first adding invented properties who's role is to appear to progress toward unity. Those invented properties are empirically unverifiable. They exist only for the reason of making up for earlier errors. It is those earlier errors that introduce disunity into a science that should display the constant presence of unity through the development of its equations.

For those who have never read my writings, the first error of theoretical physics was the decision to make mass an indefinable property. Mass is represented in physics equation by the units of kilograms. Kilograms is an indefinable unit of measurement. An indefinable property is one that is not defined in terms of pre-existing properties. Indefinable units are units that are not defined in terms of pre-existing units.

The arbitrary choice to make mass an indefinable property cost theoretical physics fundamental unity beginning right at its treatment of f=ma. Mass should have been and could have been a defined property. That simple act would have demonstrated the existence of and retained fundamental unity right from the beginning of physics equations. If physicists had begun their work with unity as a primary goal, they could have learned that mass should be a defined property.

The indefinable status of mass infects all physics theory that follows with disunity. The two remaining obstacles to re-establishing fundamental unity are the need to make temperature a defined property and the need to remove the circular definition of electric charge. Making those corrections are what I write about and do. While my ideas are not the actual subject of this essay, they do represent my efforts to apply the learning process described in the essay to myself.

James Putnam




Vladimir Rogozhin wrote on Apr. 20, 2014 @ 10:32 GMT
Dear James,

I read your essay with great interest . You write in the spirit of Descartes, his «methodical doubt», «clearly and distinctly». On the basis of your three conclusions can be constructed, justify and draw a new model of the Holistic Universe, full of meaning and laws - "the Self-Aware Universe ", where the central category - cosmic or ontological memory and our...

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 21, 2014 @ 02:22 GMT
Vladimir Rogozhin,

Thank you for this rare show of interest that demonstrates you have understood my essay. It is an honor to be mentioned together with Descartes by someone of your credentials.

"You write in the spirit of Descartes, his «methodical doubt», «clearly and distinctly». On the basis of your three conclusions can be constructed, justify and draw a new model of the Holistic Universe, full of meaning and laws - "the Self-Aware Universe ", where the central category - cosmic or ontological memory and our consciousness as the sense attractor: ..."

I will follow through on the leads you provided for reading. I look forward to reading your essay. I have begun to add messages explaining more of what I think. I do not presume that you will agree with all that I write. I am adding the writings because I see the usual disapproving responses recurring. It is not the spirit of disapproval that I see as a problem. It is the recurring messages that fail to give recognition to any results that I present in the essays. Rather the disapproving messages address issues of little relevance to what I wrote or results I presented. This being my sixth essay contest, I have decided to challenge the usual disapproving messages and usual low votes by Piling-on conclusions and ideas.

I wish you success in the contest.

James Putnam



Vladimir Rogozhin replied on Apr. 21, 2014 @ 14:01 GMT
Dear James,

Each contest FQXi - a contest for new ideas. In your essay, I saw these new ideas to address global problems, a more successful future for Humanity. Your ideas are close to me. I highly appreciate them.

I also wish you success in the contest.

Sincerely,

Vladimir

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Author James A Putnam wrote on Apr. 20, 2014 @ 20:00 GMT
Quoting a translation of a writing of Blaise Pascal,

"Scientific learning is composed of two opposites which nonetheless meet each other. The first is the natural ignorance that is man's lot at birth. The second is represented by those great minds that have investigated all knowledge accumulated by man only to discover at the end that in fact they know nothing. Thus they return to the same...

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Vladimir Rogozhin replied on Apr. 21, 2014 @ 18:53 GMT
Here I agree with you completely. Empiricism came to its limits. But we must look at the first structure of the world (hyperstructure), which generates the diversity of the world and includes all of the ultimate meaning of the Universe, all limit the meaning of "LifeWorld" (E.Husserl). Understand means «seize the structure» ( G.Gutner Ontology mathematical discourse)

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Joe Fisher wrote on Apr. 23, 2014 @ 15:57 GMT
Dear Mr. Putnam,

I thought that your abstraction filled essay was extremely well organized and written quite expertly. I do hope that it does well in the competition.

In the comment published beneath the essay, you wrote: “Theoretical physics lacks unity.” Please allow me to step into the breach and supply a bit of real unity.

INERT LIGHT THEORY

Based only on my...

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 24, 2014 @ 01:48 GMT
Hi Joe,

Thank you for evaluating my essay. I appreciate your good intentions in presenting your theory. However, our ideas of what constitutes fundamental unity are very different. Mine isn't accepted so keep working on yours. Best of luck to you in the contest.

James Putnam



Joe Fisher replied on Apr. 24, 2014 @ 13:16 GMT
Thank you James, my theory ain't ever going to be accepted either by the looks of it. I wonder if there is an unacceptable theorist support group out there somewhere where I can receive help for my affliction.

Joe

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Turil Sweden Cronburg wrote on Apr. 23, 2014 @ 17:35 GMT
What do you think causes people to not make the effort to “vigorously pursue” changes in their beliefs?

It sounds like you’re defining “free will” as the ability (or maybe successful accomplishment) of changing one’s beliefs (i.e. learning something new/different). Is that correct? And if so, how do you think that matches up to other individual’s definitions of the idea of free will?

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 23, 2014 @ 19:29 GMT
Turil Sweden Cronburg,

"What do you think causes people to not make the effort to “vigorously pursue” changes in their beliefs?"

They are emotionally satisfied with their conclusions.

"It sounds like you’re defining “free will” as the ability (or maybe successful accomplishment) of changing one’s beliefs (i.e. learning something new/different). Is that correct? And if so, how do you think that matches up to other individual’s definitions of the idea of free will?"

The intent of the essay was to address what we can know about learning from examining the empirical evidence for learning. I define free will as the ability to decide meanings for the photon data. I don't describe a circumstance where one does not exercise free will. One is free to accept their conclusions or to decide to induce the subconscious to try again and maybe reach a more satisfying conclusion. My point regarding giving the impression that we either do not exercise free will or that we do exercise free will is that it is only an impression. I was addressing the reason for why some persons might argue that we do not have free will. The reason is based upon an impression and not the absence of free will. We always exercise free will. Some just do far more with it than do others.

James Putnam




Author James A Putnam wrote on Apr. 24, 2014 @ 00:19 GMT
The unknown thermodynamic entropy:

Temperature is an unexplained property because theorists chose to declare it to be a fundamental indefinable property. Another property that depends directly on temperature for its own definition is thermodynamic entropy. Thermodynamic entropy, as originally defined by Clausius, is to this day an unexplained property. It cannot be explained because temperature is unexplained.

In order for a property to be explained it must be defined. In two cases, theorists did not know how to proceed with their theory. One case involves the all important fundamental property of mass. Mass is undefined and unexplained. The second unexplained property, by theorists' choice, is temperature. There are efforts to put forward explanations of thermodynamic entropy. Those efforts are pretend explanations. None of them fit the definition of thermodynamic entropy. Every one falls short of explaining thermodynamic entropy because they are not the same thing.

Introductions purporting to explain Clausius' definition skip passed it in favor of moving directly to the substitute explanations. Theoretical physicists can explain the substitutes because they are not definitions of thermodynamic entropy. Theoretical physicists made this problem. I have found none that will admit it. There is though a way out. Define mass and that leads to defining temperature. Define temperature and it becomes immediately understood what Clausius' thermodynamic entropy is. That is what I have written about and accomplished.

James Putnam




Author James A Putnam wrote on Apr. 24, 2014 @ 01:21 GMT
So what do these extra comments critical of theoretical physics have to do with my essay and this contest?? The point is that theoretical physics, due to its invented and undefined properties, is not a source of innate knowledge.

It has its source of knowledge in its empirical evidence. It doesn't follow that which its empirical evidence makes known to it. It has instead chosen to invent much of what it presents to us.

James Putnam




Wesley Wayne Hansen wrote on Apr. 25, 2014 @ 16:50 GMT
A wonderful little essay, James; it's reminiscent of the Semiotics of Charles Peirce. The little section describing JOY is quite exquisite. I'm reminded of James Joyce with his two types of art: static and kinetic. Kinetic art is that which moves one's gross emotions: lust; desire; revulsion; anger; etc. Static art, on the other hand, holds one in arrest; it awakens that innate JOY which typically slumbers deep within.

In Peirce's Semiotics, the Universe becomes an infinite semiosis involving the meaningful interplay between sign, the signified, and the interpretant; meaning and the communication of meaning takes a fundamental nature. The Nobel laureate, Brian Josephson, amongst others, is attempting to construct/explore a more holistic and semiotic approach to physical science as evidenced by his paper, "Biological Observer-Participation and Wheeler's 'Law without Law'". I, for one, certainly believe this approach has the potential to be more emotionally satisfying . . .

With regards,

Wes Hansen

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 27, 2014 @ 19:23 GMT
Wesley Wayne Hansen,

Thank you for liking my essay. Your messages is warmly received. I read your essay and have been thinking about it. I was struck by the difference between our pursuits of learning. I am not on a spiritual awakening journey. I don't have a religious purpose to my work. My purpose for my work is much 'drier' than is yours. The point of my work, including the physics...

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Wesley Wayne Hansen replied on May. 2, 2014 @ 15:26 GMT
James,

Yes, I believe I have a decent understanding of your position. In a sense it reminds me a great deal of what in Buddhism is called "The Theory of Two Truths." According to the school of thought which I follow (originally formulated by the Indian master, Nagarjuna) the two truths are really equivalent, they are really just different perspectives or different ways of perceiving....

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Edwin Eugene Klingman wrote on Apr. 26, 2014 @ 06:55 GMT
Dear James,

This is by far your best essay. It probably helps that you have argued these points (mostly with Tom) for years. As you know I tend to agree with your perspective and I definitely agree that "knowledge of meanings is innate." You correctly note that "the ability to interpret photon data could not have been acquired by repetition. There has never been repetition."

I...

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 27, 2014 @ 19:35 GMT
Dear Edwin,

I am very happy to see your essay entry and to receive your message. You were inactive so far as I could tell for too long. I repeatedly searched on the Internet for any current activity. I was getting worried. Anyway, you are fine, still kicking, and writing. I have read your essay with enjoyment and appreciation. I didn't rate it yet.

Thank you for your assessment of my current essay. I consider its subject to be foundationally important for scientific learning. With regard to my previous essays, I rate their importance higher than it seems anyone else does. :-) Thank you for re-appearing on the Internet stage.

James




Margarita Iudin wrote on Apr. 29, 2014 @ 01:24 GMT
Hello James,

I read your submission and I would like you to read mine. I actually read some of your articles several years ago and I agree with you on some things. This essay, frankly to say, is as good as any other publication. Correct me if I missed you writing down any original idea.

In my essay I write about the imagining, analogous imagining and how people think. You may find it interesting. The essay is a part of the collection of futuristic essays.

You may look at my entry about imagining the future. I hope my essay will encourage you to learn more about ways of knowing and to apply analogous imagining in your field of interests.

Please disregard any typo mistakes you may encounter.

Wish you well,

Margarita Iudin

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Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 29, 2014 @ 01:34 GMT
Dear Margarita,

Thank you for your forthright opinion. I will read your essay now.

James Putnam



Author James A Putnam replied on Apr. 29, 2014 @ 03:28 GMT
Dear Margarita,

I have read your messages to others. and, I don't think you need to be told this, but others may need to know it. I gave your essay a TEN without qualifications. You are welcome to not rate my essay or to rate it secretly at whatever level you judge to be proper. It is your essay that matters. I hope that you will do well with it in the contest.

James




Author James A Putnam wrote on Apr. 29, 2014 @ 01:25 GMT
Dear Edwin,

I rated your essay.

James



Edwin Eugene Klingman replied on May. 8, 2014 @ 07:28 GMT
And I yours.

Best regards,

Edwin Eugene Klingman

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Author James A Putnam wrote on May. 1, 2014 @ 04:40 GMT
I endorse the essay Imagining the future humanity by Margarita Iudin.

James Putnam




Peter Jackson wrote on May. 2, 2014 @ 15:46 GMT
James,

An excellently written analysis, well focussed and presented. I think the proposition is also more valid and important than most realise. I not only agree but was also pleased as it all sat very well and consistently with my own recent hypothesese for advancement of fundamental understanding ('harmonic resonance'?)

A couple of minor points. You seem refer to the 'photon storm'...

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 2, 2014 @ 20:49 GMT
Hi Peter,

There are reasons for the wording I chose. Its not important. I think the essay makes its point no matter who's model is used. Putting that aside, I haven't said anything at your forum because I can't help. I have followed all conversations regarding your work, I expected objections to be raised, but the ones on my mind seem to get through without a fuss. I saw the very strong endorsement Edwin gave you. He has found favor with your work for years now. So you are doing well even if it doesn't feel that way. I admit that I was wrong about the hollow horse. It continues to function well. I am assuming that you will recognize what I mean. Thanks for coming down to visit. I appreciate having my essay rated. I will wait till closer to the end to make some of my ratings. You know on ebay it can pay off to hold your last bid till the last five seconds. :-) Anyway, thanks and do remember to return to Margarita's essay.

James Putnam



Peter Jackson replied on May. 3, 2014 @ 20:23 GMT
thanks James,

I was hoping you might say mine helped clear the mire of illogicality from QM as many have, but some basic understanding of it's pretexts is probably needed before they can be rationalised.

If you have any queries on your mind do please raise them, if they're misunderstands I may be able to clarify, or anything valid is always a help too.

Yes, the Trojan horse may yet take a few years to build, but probabilities and chance are funny things, in fact theory is certainly now creeping inexorably closer!

I may desperately need a few late points so don't forget me. I won't forget Marge, she sits next to me in class. I see John M also has problems with his "go" button!

best wishes

Peter

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 4, 2014 @ 02:11 GMT
Peter,

My differences include the position that the effects known as time dilation and length contraction are real for objects with mass. Time dilation is not meant here to suggest that time dilates, it is merely following convention and calling the slowing of atomic processes as 'time dilation'. It is not my opinion that is important. I am not a physicist. I think you have been upfront...

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Author James A Putnam wrote on May. 2, 2014 @ 23:04 GMT
All the essays are listed. Any visitor here who would like me to read and rate their essay please direct me to them. I have decided, after viewing many essays, to not give out ones and twos. I feel that there would be a sufficient number to make it look like I was just pulling others down. I will give good ratings to essays that I think deserve them. So, maybe some help but definitely no hurt. The subject matter opened the door for several contributors to vent their distortions, my opinion, of our system or closely related matters. I may discuss those essays but will not rate those essays. There are many others who like them. I am interested in seeing how well they do without my interference.

James Putnam




KoGuan Leo wrote on May. 3, 2014 @ 09:29 GMT
Hi James, what a great pleasure to have a companion in my journey in this world. I agree with everything you wrote. If I may add my own theory that I believe consistent with yours that A=E-S ⊆ T where A is Anti-entropic time-future photon bits-wave function moves at c toward S, entropic time-past graviton bits-waves function that is pinning in place at c. And E is the composite of A+S. A is the giver (teacher) of information to S and E. To be brief, I would rate your original, succinctly and beautifully written essay 10. Double ten! Yes, I agree with your conclusion on your idea above: "That is what I have written about and accomplished." Well accomplished.

Good Luch!

Best wishes,

Leo KoGuan

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Margarita Iudin wrote on May. 6, 2014 @ 20:41 GMT
Hello Mr.Putnam

This is Margarita Iudin. I want to thank you for your nice comments. By the way, to rank the essays I used the same strategy as you suggest to use in your post.

Cheers,

M Iudin

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Hoang cao Hai wrote on May. 14, 2014 @ 04:17 GMT
Dear James A Putnam

Glad to meet you. I am very impressed with your views in this essay and 10 points be to cheer for that .

Hải.CaoHoàng

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Author James A Putnam wrote on May. 17, 2014 @ 13:48 GMT
I endorse Peter Gluck's essay A pragmatic strategy for catalyzing self-sustained progress

James Putnam




Christian Corda wrote on May. 20, 2014 @ 21:13 GMT
Dear James,

As I promised in my Essay page, I have read your particular and nice Essay. Here are my comments:

1) The title of your Essay recalls Einstein's famous statement that "Imagination is more important than knowledge".

2) There is a very simple proof of your sentence that "our eyes are "observing" events, our subconscious mind is working wonderfully well at telling our conscious mind what we are seeing". We must merely look a face in a photo. We will see that the eyes in the face are looking us! This is due to the issue that our sight has only a two-dimensional power. The third dimension is added by our brain.

3) I think that the concept of innate knowledge is not uncomfortable for who believes in a mechanical interpretation of the universe. In my point of view, innate knowledge and emotions are different for different people, and, in turn, the mechanical interpretation of the universe is subjective.

4) Your statement that "the universe communicated with us and we understood its meaning" looks compatible with the anthropic principle.

5) Concerning your statements that "we can fail to correctly interpret the information. The problem is that the data may be unclear" I think that based on your previous statements, emotions have an important role in this issue.

6) I find very intriguing your statement that "Free will exists because of undiscovered knowledge".

In any case, you wrote a nice Essay, for which I had fun. Thus, I am going to give you an high score.

I wish you best luck in the contest.

Cheers,

Ch.

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 23, 2014 @ 16:53 GMT
Dear Christian,

Thank you for your comments and the rating. The comments will be food for thought. It is always a help to receive the opinion of a PHD. A high rating from you is highly valued.

James



Author James A Putnam replied on May. 29, 2014 @ 18:22 GMT
Dear Christian,

"1) The title of your Essay recalls Einstein's famous statement that "Imagination is more important than knowledge"."

This statement by Einstein has always given me pause. One reason is I think imagination that produces correct knowledge is more important than knowledge that does not advance because it lacks imagination. How that fits in with my essay is that...

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 29, 2014 @ 18:37 GMT
Dear Christian,

"3) I think that the concept of innate knowledge is not uncomfortable for who believes in a mechanical interpretation of the universe. In my point of view, innate knowledge and emotions are different for different people, and, in turn, the mechanical interpretation of the universe is subjective."

The reason I used the word uncomfortable is because I see no way to trace innate knowledge back to the mechanical interpretation. I am aware that complexity of events and eons of time are credited with allowing for intelligent results to arise from mechanical properties. I think though that this belief is an example of an incorrect imagined possibility. I see no way for the dumbness of mechanics to give rise to intelligent life. I describe mechanics with the word 'dumbness' because there are, so far as I know, no physics equations that predict or explain the existence of intelligent life. I do see an effort to attribute the existence of intelligent life to mechanics merely by association. What I mean is that it is concluded that the foundational properties of the universe are mechanical. and, it is observed that the universe gave birth to intelligent life. Therefore, it is concluded, by association, that mechanics gave rise to intelligent life. This is not a case of learning innate knowledge. This is a case of relying solely upon risky imagination. That is what I think.

James Putnam




murat Asgatovich gaisin wrote on May. 23, 2014 @ 04:43 GMT
Dear James A Putnam

I put high marks for originality of the concept of "innate knowledge." Nevertheless, I believe that knowledge is external to man - the theory of Vernadsky's noosphere.

Regards,

Murat Asgatovich Gaisin

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 23, 2014 @ 05:00 GMT
Murat Asgatovich Gaisin,

Thank you for sharing your opinion. I don't think that there is difference in our opinions except perhaps in how we express it. I don't think that knowledge originated from within man. My presentation was intended to deal with the symptoms and not the source. We are given knowledge from the source of knowledge. I don't define that source in my essay. I was writing...

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Author James A Putnam wrote on May. 25, 2014 @ 16:51 GMT
I encourage others to read and rate Our Reach Should Exceed Our Grasp by G. Steven Colyer-Sivco

James



Peter Gluck replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 08:32 GMT
Dear James,

Your essay is simply wonderful, citable as a poem in prose about innate knowledge.

It is a beautiful Pareto Truth having as immediate complement Conquered Truth. It is about effort and sacrifices.

I have a collection of about 200000 quotations- I will extract some bright ones from your essay.

With admiration,

Peter

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 13:24 GMT
Peter Gluck,

It is an honor to receive a message such as you have written. Thank you for your kind words.

James




Laurence Hitterdale wrote on May. 26, 2014 @ 18:51 GMT
Hello James,

Your essay is clearly written. Because I am writing these remarks rather late in the comment period and because you have already discussed my concerns at some length in your replies to other commentators, I will not add anything more at this time. I have also looked at some of your other work posted on the Web, and I am impressed with the unity and comprehensiveness of your approach.

I very much appreciate the thoughtful comments that you made on my essay about two weeks ago.

Laurence Hitterdale

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Author James A Putnam replied on May. 26, 2014 @ 20:55 GMT
Laurence,

Thank you for taking the time to make your comments. I appreciate that you have seriously considered my views. Your essay is doing well because it deserves to do well.

James




Author James A Putnam wrote on May. 27, 2014 @ 22:38 GMT
I can't be certain due to rounding errors, but, it appears that I may have received seven '1's, two '2's, three '8's, and, seven '10's.

James



Author James A Putnam replied on May. 27, 2014 @ 23:12 GMT
Roger,

I posted the votes I have reason to believe I have received. Not a single low vote has left any comment. There are, I think, nine of them. Seven '1's and two '2's. This is not a complaint. The system is what it is and I accepted it by entering the contest. I am hanging on at, what I think is, the lowest end of essays eligible for the finals. I gave no low votes period, but, I might just overcome the Oners this time.

James



Author James A Putnam replied on May. 28, 2014 @ 12:50 GMT
Make that eight '1's

James




Author James A Putnam wrote on May. 29, 2014 @ 00:48 GMT
A comment I made in another essayist's forum:

"A great essay!!! Ten points easily!!! It is a highly competent damage report! The needle went off the scale! However you intended it to be, I read it as the prelude to greater essay explaining how to return sensibility to science, to theoretical physics in particular. For me to go further, would be me just repeating what I have written in six essay contests and elsewhere. However, your essay is what exists here and now and I loved it for my own reasons."

I post it here because I stand by it.

James Putnam




James Lee Hoover wrote on Jun. 1, 2014 @ 17:09 GMT
James,

Your thoughts seem somewhat profound, like they are beneath the noise of traffic. I like them because they are fertile fields that we must harvest ourselves. We obviously can't tell others how to think -- experience should soon tell us that. "Words of caring and unity for both social and scientific goals" seems a little like my entreaty to work for the "common good," but agendas do tend to guide how the short-sighted "fit meanings" to the "photons." Maybe that's what we mean by self-deception.

Then again I am fitting meanings to the message and maybe not connecting with my "subconscious conclusions."

High marks.

Would like to hear your thoughts on my essay: http://www.fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/2008

Jim

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Author James A Putnam wrote on Jun. 1, 2014 @ 18:12 GMT
For a very good essay that is also a literary accomplishment read: The future is the past by Roger Schlafly.

James Putnam




Author James A Putnam wrote on Jun. 1, 2014 @ 21:10 GMT
James Lee Hoover,

Thank you for rating my essay for what it says. I am reading your essay at this time. I only have read to page 3 thus far, but I do wish to compliment you for your restraint and accuracy about wealth discrepancy. You aimed at the Eighty Five rather than the one percent. One percent is like 32,000,000 people including myself who has paid off my modest 78 home, own a modest 401k, and saved an IRA with all debts paid. Because this adds up on paper above the one million dollar mark, I have to read several other essays that tell me that I am helping to enslave half of the rest of the world. I will openly compare my life with the carelessly judgmental academic elitists who include me in their misleading statistics. Putting aside my impatience with those others, I am anxious to complete your essay which gives promise to be quality. I can now relax and carefully read your essay. Thank you.

James Putnam



James Lee Hoover replied on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 16:26 GMT
James,

Thanks for reading my essay and for your kind words. I like subtlety and literary accomplishment -- both of which yours showed. I don't think I have read Roger's yet, so I will try it.

Jim

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Lorraine Ford wrote on Jun. 2, 2014 @ 09:08 GMT
Hi James,

I agree with most of what you say, but I see it from a slightly different perspective:

I agree that people (subjects) are themselves "the teacher" (I'm not sure that this is exactly what you meant). You can't inject knowledge into an insensitive unresponsive entity: subjects themselves experience and create new knowledge connections (information relationships) to the rest...

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Lorraine Ford replied on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 06:17 GMT
Hi James,

Re joy:

Have a look at this video of Mobula rays. I would think that for whatever dry dusty scientific "reason" might be given for why they are doing what they are doing, these rays are enjoying themselves!

http://news.distractify.com/fun/over-10000-of-the
se-ocean-creatures-mysteriously-gathered-and-then-they-took-
flight/?v=1

Cheers,

Lorraine

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Author James A Putnam replied on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 13:04 GMT
Hi Lorraine,

I know from your writings that you have thought deeply about many things. My essay was narrowly focused on this point: The reception of photons as our means of communication demonstrates that knowledge is innate. I believe that many physicists would argue that, other than instinct, knowledge is not innate. I used their physics to show them that they are mistaken. At least that is what I have attempted to do. I think that strong resistance to this idea will continue. I think this is because the existence of innate intelligence is incompatible with the foundational properties of a mechanical interpretation of the universe. In other words, if intelligence is innate, then theoretical physics is not the true foundational science. In other words, mechanics is not the nature of the universe.

Right above this conversation, there is a message from Margarita Iudin. I would be interested in your opinion about her essay Imagining the future humanity.

I will try to write again soon in more detail about your points in your message. Thank you for reading my essay and commenting. I just read your essay but haven't commented or rated it yet. I will try to do those today.

James




Margarita Iudin wrote on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 00:53 GMT
Hello Mr. Putnam,

This is Margarita Iudin. You liked my essay called Imagining the future humanity http://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/2096

1. Now I have a serious problem to find among the contest entrants those who will be able to understand the topic.

In my study I constantly use the analogous imagining at the very large extent. The analogous imagining is more than a method of exploration. We all use the analogous imagining (imitating).

I am looking for the open-minded and knowledgeable audience. Would you like to advise me what to do?

2.I re-read your essay - you do not say anything about temperature, but in one of your posts, that i cannot find right now, you started to talk about temperature.

While classical physical sciences often concern with a link between temperature and kinetic energy of the real particles, there are other at the deeper level of the understanding temperature has to do everything with materialization of matter and POLARIZATION OF VACUUM. I am sure you know this without me. Magnetization is indeed the fun thing to tackle.

Cheers,

MI

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Author James A Putnam replied on Jun. 3, 2014 @ 14:17 GMT
Margarita,

"1. Now I have a serious problem to find among the contest entrants those who will be able to understand the topic.

In my study I constantly use the analogous imagining at the very large extent. The analogous imagining is more than a method of exploration. We all use the analogous imagining (imitating).

I am looking for the open-minded and knowledgeable audience. Would you like to advise me what to do?"

Visit these essay forums comment on their essays and ask for each author to read and rate your essay:

Edwin Eugene Klingman, Laurence Hitterdale, James Lee Hoover, Tejinder Pal Singh, Vladimir I. Rogozhin, Lorraine Ford, Roger Schlafly, Peter Gluck

Leave a link back to your essay at each forum. In case you are not familiar with how to create links here, the link should be written like the following but without the two ? signs [?link:fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/2096]Imagining the future humanity by Margarita Iudin[?/link]. Remove the two ? and your link will work correctly. I have included those two ? only so that what I have written doesn't become a link: Here is what it will look like with the two ? removed Imagining the future humanity by Margarita Iudin

James



Author James A Putnam replied on Jun. 4, 2014 @ 02:59 GMT
To everyone whom I linked to above,

Margarita asked for some help locating fair-minded people to read her essay. I didn't realize that your own work would be judged to be inferior because it differed from her opinion. If she disagrees with what is written, she describes the work as inferior. Margarita's ideas are not automatically a standard for correctness. Each of you have contributed excellent essays expressing your ideas. Your ideas are valued by me. Even when I have different opinions, your ideas are valued by me. Thank you each for contributing your essays and sharing your expertise and ideas. I learn from you.

James Putnam



Margarita Iudin replied on Jun. 4, 2014 @ 05:43 GMT
Hello James,

Do not worry.

It is not about the rating or peer-to-peer evaluation. We seek for a better understanding, don't we?

I actually stopped rating a long ago.

Cheers,

MI

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Margarita Iudin wrote on Jun. 4, 2014 @ 05:35 GMT
Hello Mr Putnam,

Thank you for your advice.

Except, Schlafly's. Yak. The exploitation of the great names.

You should not recommend me to read this essay.

Sincerely,

MI

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Author James A Putnam replied on Jun. 4, 2014 @ 12:30 GMT
Margarita,

I recommend The future is the past by Roger Schlafly for everyone to read. I liked it. The reader sees what they want to see in it. That effect results from the reader's belief system. Belief systems matter where they should not. It is the state of the science that is responsible for that effect. The essay does not exploit anything. It is both a scientific document and a literary accomplishment.

James




Arthur R. Woods wrote on Jun. 5, 2014 @ 04:55 GMT
Dear James

Thank you for reading my essay and for your comments.

I really enjoyed your essay and I rated it several weeks ago but only now have found the time to comment. I join the large group of commenters who really liked your lyrical style of writing.

You have provided a number of profound concepts within your text which led to moments of reflection, as in your statement:

"Access innate meanings and one's message will resonate emotionally with others."

Also, thank you for the recommendations that you have posted concerning other essays. They were helpful.

Good luck in the final stretch.

Best regards,

Arthur

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Janko Kokosar wrote on Jun. 5, 2014 @ 14:24 GMT
Dear James Putnam

I see that you advocate free will, as I too. I write about this in my essay from 2013. In that contest I also exchanged some mails with Paul Reed who do not believe in free will. In that essay I also gave some link about free will, also a pure quantum mathematical proof for free will of Conway and Kochen. But, I do not follow completely to your idea. Why subconscious is proof for free will. It can also be a illusion of free will, for which we think that it is free will?

My essay

Best regards

Janko Kokosar

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Author James A Putnam replied on Jun. 5, 2014 @ 16:49 GMT
Hi Janko,

The activity of our subconscious mind has to be demonstrating free-will if we have free-will. The point of my essay was to argue that our ability to interpret photon data and make choices about its meanings demonstrates that free-will does exist. I do not argue that free-will originates in our subconscious mind. I am thinking that when you say "Why subconscious is proof for free will. It can also be a illusion of free will, for which we think that it is free will?" that you are meaning that free-will originates elsewhere long before the subconscious mind was formed. I think that we agree that the origin of free-will exists at the fundamental levels of the operation of the universe. Perhaps we would also agree that this means that the existence of free-will was provided for from the beginning of the universe. In other words, all effects that have occurred or will ever occur in the universe had to have been provided for at the beginning of the universe. I think that this is a requirement in order to not allow more than one 'miracle'. It is also a condition that prevents theorists from adding invented or imagined properties onto theoretical physics. Let me know what you think please. Thank you for your message.

James




Jonathan J. Dickau wrote on Jun. 7, 2014 @ 02:59 GMT
Interesting and excellent James..

A poignant reminder that sometimes our instinctual side knows more than our consciously thinking self. That's always good to remember. I think that's in part a function of the right-brain, in its integration of objects and events into something we might call trends, but comes out as intuition in our perceptions. Well written piece.

All the Best,

Jonathan

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