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RECENT POSTS IN THIS TOPIC

Johnny Cash: on 10/5/17 at 8:57am UTC, wrote I have a prediction based on the essay's simplex geometry. A ratio...

Hon Jia Koh: on 12/29/13 at 3:13am UTC, wrote Hi Antony, In case you are interested, just posted an update in my thread...

Antony Ryan: on 9/15/13 at 1:40am UTC, wrote Shame the conversations have stopped. Enjoyable process. If there are any...

Antony Ryan: on 8/30/13 at 9:36am UTC, wrote DEAR READER, I have a prediction based on the essay's simplex geometry. A...

Antony Ryan: on 8/19/13 at 15:44pm UTC, wrote Hi Lorraine, Sorry for late reply! Great way to think about this! In this...

Lorraine Ford: on 8/12/13 at 0:34am UTC, wrote Hi Antony, Thanks for getting back to me about numbers. I am still trying...

Antony Ryan: on 8/11/13 at 17:19pm UTC, wrote Hello Daryl, I've just seen your reply - sorry. I'll ponder the question...

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FQXi FORUM
November 23, 2017

CATEGORY: It From Bit or Bit From It? Essay Contest (2013) [back]
TOPIC: It’s Fibonacci’s Bit - Seeding the Universe with 0 and 1 by Antony Ryan [refresh]
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Author Antony Ryan wrote on May. 30, 2013 @ 17:21 GMT
Essay Abstract

John Wheeler suggested that information is fundamental to physics, resulting in the very nature of what we observe. However, any information that passes beyond an event horizon becomes empirically lost. What happens to it? Here, I explore the fundamentals of how information is exchanged in reality, how it changes, and any potential for it to be destroyed. Remarkably the Fibonacci sequence, appearing so often in nature, is revealed from this voyage, bringing with it possible answers to Wheeler’s question.

Author Bio

Antony Ryan has a BSc in Chemistry from the University of Liverpool. Over the last 6 years he has moved independently into theoretical physics, having developed a fundamental model which addresses the three paradoxes of cosmogony and partly unifies the four forces of nature.

Download Essay PDF File




John C Maguire wrote on Jun. 3, 2013 @ 18:09 GMT
Antony,

Interesting read. Would you mind elaborating a bit on your conclusion. In particular your mention of the Holographic Principle:

"This system also lends itself to a spatially 3-dimensional Universe emerging from 0-dimensionailty, because information exchange is limited to 0, 1, 1, and 2-dimensionailty within a Black Hole, which is hidden from the 3-dimensionality outside. In...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 4, 2013 @ 19:35 GMT
Many thanks for reading and taking the time to respond John. I'm glad you found it interesting.

Rather than information being stored on a 2-dimensional boundary, as per holographic principle, I draw the analogy that Black Hole event horizons are a 2-dimensional boundary where information becomes changed/hidden from the outside 3-dimensionality.

The Fibonacci sequence gives 3, from 0,...

view entire post





Joe Fisher wrote on Jun. 4, 2013 @ 17:05 GMT
Anthony,

The real Universe could not have a base 2 system with 0 and 1 at its foundation because the real Universe is unique.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 4, 2013 @ 19:27 GMT
Hi Joe,

Thanks for the less personally insulting post to the previous one. Good point to make. Whether the Universe is unique or not, there is nothing to stop it having 0 and 1. Your unique system would surely allow 0 and 1. Both ways would allow higher numbers allowing every point in the Universe to be unique, so there may be some common ground there?

Best Wishes

Antony



Joe Fisher replied on Jun. 5, 2013 @ 15:48 GMT
Anthony,

I deeply regret the first comment and I am glad it was removed. Both of the supposedly whole postulated numbers 0 and 1 are formed by a single line. Computers using Boolean algebra represent the physical values of the 0 and the 1 as being identical to a switch (or an electro-magnetic impulse) having the capability of being off for 0, and on for 1. But there is a huge problem....

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 11, 2013 @ 17:00 GMT
Hello Joe,

Fibonacci indeed has -1 in the sequence (-1, 1, 0, 1, 1). I speculate this to allow for Hawking Radiation to let Black oles lose mass.

Best Wishes

Antony




Vladimir F. Tamari wrote on Jun. 5, 2013 @ 02:03 GMT
Hello Antony

I have read your essay with interest. When Fibonacci discovered his series he had little idea of its amazing and wide applications in other branches of mathematics, in describing some geometrical patterns in nature and as you describe, in theoretical physics.

Your approach makes sense if you posit a granular vacuum in which each granule communicates with adjacent ones. The pattern spreads accumulating new granules step by step in a linear, causal logical and easily pictured way. In the discussion on probability in my Beautiful Universe Theory I have shown how this leads to explaining quantum probability - not from a vacuum chaos but from exquisite order, such as a binomial distribution in a lattice. This is very similar to Pascal's triangle, hence to Fibonacci.

I am no expert on entropy or black holes, but feel you might be onto an interesting line for further study and development.

With best wishes

Vladimir

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 10, 2013 @ 15:17 GMT
Hello Vladimir,

Thank you for your kind comments. My own geometric theory is similar to Causal Dynamical Triangulation, so what you say about granular adjacent space makes very good sense. I look forward to reading your theory, as the approach you describe sounds favourable to an early ordered Universe.

Best wishes

Antony




Philip Gibbs wrote on Jun. 5, 2013 @ 17:42 GMT
Anthony, it's always good to see an essay that uses a bit of number theory. Number theory is the other thing I sometimes do some work on apart from physics. I was especially chuffed one time when a paper I wrote on number theory was cited by a physicist. The connections run deep and Fibonacci numbers often come up in such links. I think you are very right that they are important to nature.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 10, 2013 @ 15:25 GMT
Hi Philip,

Thanks for the reading and the comments. The occurrences in nature of Fibonacci are incredible alone. What strikes me as beautiful is the very symmetric asymmetry that the sequence gives naturally when passing downwards past 0.

I'm using n-dimension simplex vertex numbers (a mouthful I know), to represent order. This apples more in my cosmogony theory. However, this would...

view entire post





Lawrence B Crowell wrote on Jun. 6, 2013 @ 00:50 GMT
It will take me until the weekend to seriously read essays.I did though read the first couple of pages of your paper. I presume that you are proposing an unfolding of spaces of various dimensions according to the Fibonacci sequence.

The icosian or 120-cell has two quaternions with length (1/2)(1 +/- sqrt{5}) where the plus one has length 1.618..., which is the golden mean. In fact these quaternions define something called the golden field in a Galois ring. This is related to the Fibonacci sequence.

Cheers LC

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 10, 2013 @ 15:34 GMT
Lawrence, thanks for finding the time to read my essay.

What you suggest is another way to look at this. I will find it very helpful to future study on this subject.

I envisaged the sequence crossing from normal space into a Black Hole as purely the change in the way information is processed dimensionally, which always seems unidirectional with time. Perhaps what you have mentioned is the other side of the same coin.

Cheers,

Antony




Kenneth Allen Getch wrote on Jun. 12, 2013 @ 13:48 GMT
I was asked to comment on this essay. I am an informatics and software engineer by education and trade so this is outside of my normal scope of interest. With that said I think it was well written and your theory well stated. I am reminded of the solutions to AIDS protein configurations that were solved by the social gaming platform fold.it. I bring this up as it reinforces the theory that the universe doesn't do things on a whim. The protein uses as little energy as possible to exist and I believe that is a possible law of the universe. Your correlation to possibility of preserving information and mathematical balance only makes sense as why destroy the information? If this universe is trying to go back to zero then it would need a mechanism to do that and that mechanism would be as efficient as possible. Each of your possible "strangely diverse quantum like results" seem to each attempt a balance.

Again, this may be complete rubbish and below what you are used to. I wish you the best of luck.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 13, 2013 @ 15:17 GMT
Many thanks for taking the time to read and comment on this Kenneth.

I am glad to see that my essay brought to mind other interesting instances where the Universe behaves in this way. I'm delighted that you noticed the symmetrically balanced way information is treated here. The Fibonacci sequence certainly seems to be followed empirically and it is driven by entropy without destroying information.

Again thank you for your thoughtful, kind and well considered comments.

Best wishes,

Antony




Willard Mittelman wrote on Jun. 14, 2013 @ 01:54 GMT
Hi Antony,

Thanks for your comments over at my paper. I agree that our viewpoints are compatible, though each of us does have a somewhat different focus. I also found your paper very interesting and well-written.

I'm intrigued by the relation between your account and Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDTs), which you mentioned above in the comments. Lately, Ambjorn and his co-workers have been connecting CDTs with Horava-Lifshitz gravity, which interests me because of the existence of a preferred frame in the latter, such a frame being consistent with the kind of large-scale nonlocality that I describe. (Indeed, Niayesh Afshordi has argued that something like his gravitational aether can be viewed as the low-energy limit of Horava-Lifshitz gravity.) This aspect of CDTs may be worth exploring as you develop your ideas further.

At any rate, good luck to you in the contest!

-Willard

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 14, 2013 @ 03:22 GMT
Willard - thank you for your kind post and comments. I know a little about Ambjorn and Loll's work but not Horava-Lifshitz gravity. That's great to hear about. I will study it further and get back to you.

My reference to CDT is from my geometric theory which led me to Fibonacci behaviour around Black Holes.

Luckily it sits well with information's relationship with reality and Black Holes being a potential "enemy" of information - hence the timing of me discovering the relation - March this year, was good.

I wasn't sure whether to include the entropy discussion as that could have been a paper on its own. Although relevant, I hope it wasn't too distracting from the main point around Fibonacci's relationship with Bit and It?

Anyway nice to "meet" you and all the best with the contest.

Antony




Hoang cao Hai wrote on Jun. 17, 2013 @ 21:08 GMT
Dear Antony

Very attractive when you compare with the story of "chicken and egg" because I also used to think like that, but I found a different result - more precisely.

http://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/1802

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 19, 2013 @ 04:31 GMT
Thanks for looking at my essay. I'm glad that your appreciated the chicken and egg conclusion. Perhaps I'd consider Bit and It as two sides of the same coin a stronger position than not deciding which came first.

I've now read your essay and think that you might say that a God was Bit leading to reality?

Anyway best wishes,

Antony




basudeba mishra wrote on Jun. 20, 2013 @ 02:01 GMT
Dear Sir,

Many of your views in this essay has been discussed in our essay published on May 31 from a totally different perspective. You are welcome to visit us and comment on it.

In the field of science, the 19th century was one of experimentation, 20th century of excitement and 21st century of observation. Thus, it is no surprise that Wheeler was excited to find something he...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 20, 2013 @ 07:31 GMT
Dear, Basudeba,

I can't answer your comments above as we are clearly looking at reality in extremely different ways.

Regards

Antony




Wilhelmus de Wilde wrote on Jun. 20, 2013 @ 14:41 GMT
Antony,

Firts of all thank you for reading my essay.

I just read yours. ersonnally I like very much The spirals of nature and Leonard de Pise, (Fibonacci). One of the causes of the beauty of our perceptance of nature is given in this mathematical sequence. Again a sequence....

regarding the loss of information in Black Holes I tend to think like Abhay Ashtekar and Carlo Rovelli in their Loop Quantum Gravity perception. Their latest proposal tells us that in the heart of a black hole there is no singulairity (the same as my perception) but an entry to another dimension that can be the origin of a new universe. Infact they come almost to the same conlusion as I do , onlt my perception goes further because this "entrance" to another dimension (that I call Total Simultaneity) is everywhere . Indeed I do not believe in non dimensional points called "singularities". So when information enters a black hole it is not lost at all it just returns to its origins...

best regards

Wilhelmus

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 21, 2013 @ 05:35 GMT
Hello Wilhelus,

Thanks for your kind comments. I'm glad you like the sequence approach. One thing it suggests is that the singularity (0) would not be a final point, because the sequence is driven backward via entropy. Also, due to -1, 1, 0, 1, 1 part of the sequence information always conserves information away from the singularity, so effectively information can't fall into it, but are effected become new dimensions.

Thus I think we have very compatible views here. Again I enjoyed your essay and wish you the best of luck in the contest!

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 21, 2013 @ 05:37 GMT
Sorry for typo Wilhelmus




Yuri Danoyan wrote on Jun. 23, 2013 @ 20:26 GMT
Good idea for use Fibonacci on the quantum cosmology.I am try it also on science forum

http://www.scienceforums.net/topic/72326-did-the-univer
se-unwinded-by-fibonacci-sequence/

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 23, 2013 @ 20:32 GMT
Thank you Yuri,

I will take a look!

All the best,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 00:21 GMT
Yuri - I have left a comment over on your page - best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 23, 2013 @ 22:13 GMT
After reading Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta's essay (Information, Reality and Relics of Cosmic Microwave Background), where I noticed the abstract says - "a mere description of material properties does not produce material". While of course materials do give information.

I realised I'd concluded differently in my essay.

I think perhaps reality can be more fundamental than information. At the very least, I would not say that information is likely more fundamental than reality itself, but then that's the beauty of this competition, it encourages shared ideas!



Satyavarapu Naga Parameswara Gupta replied on Jun. 28, 2013 @ 22:05 GMT
Thank you very much Antony,

Thank you for remembering my essay.

All the reality, all the information about the matter by our 6 senses ( mind is another sense)are stored as stored as pictures in our mind. This picture we will share with other human beings when we live. What we transfer via the communication to others is INFORMATION, It is never a matter. We may hand ove a physical...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 29, 2013 @ 09:54 GMT
Thanks for reply SNP,

I'll read over your essay again after reading the amendments & extra information.

All the best,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 12, 2013 @ 13:07 GMT
Great points Gupta - I've commented over on your page - Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 24, 2013 @ 01:47 GMT
I've read Eckard Blumschein's essay - Shannon’s View on Wheeler’s credo

I then posted the following - which I have pasted over here:

Shannon's view “We know the past but cannot control it. We control the future but cannot know it” jumped out at me as analogous to my essay's observer/observation approach that revealed a Fibonacci pattern.

In my case it would be: - We know some information but cannot reveal it. We reveal some information but cannot collect more.

I already suggested an arrow of time from this, but your essay has further helped make it relevant given the Shannon analogy.




Akinbo Ojo wrote on Jun. 24, 2013 @ 10:16 GMT
Hi Antony,

Thanks for your comment on my blog.

Your paper is very nice and that is no flattery. There may even be something hidden and very fundamental in your description of Fibonacci sequences.

But before I comment further, let me say I am still sceptical about the black hole idea, i.e. that all mass can be compressed to a point of "zero" dimension and the attribute of mass...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 00:35 GMT
Hi Akinbo,

Thank you so much for your kind words and looking at my essay so thoroughly. I'm delighted you left these useful and constructive comments.

I hope too that it provokes interest along the lines of Wheeler with regard to something from nothing, as this is a subject very close to my heart. In fact this essay arose from my geometric theory of everything that also gives rise to...

view entire post




Akinbo Ojo replied on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 13:55 GMT
Hi Antony,

I will be looking more at the Fibonnaci attributes. I suspect that complex appearances and attributes can be derived from the simplest of things using this principle.

Concerning, your planned cosmology paper, you may check out if there are any useful ideas on some aspects I have written about. search: Ojo on arXiv.

Best regards,

Akinbo

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 17:48 GMT
Hi Akinbo,

I agree that the most complex aspects of reality must be derived from the most simple foundations. Ultimately, I like to start with complete nothingness.

Thanks for your kind assistance - I look forward to reading your work on arXiv. Perhaps we may one day collaborate...?

Delighted to "meet" you!

Antony




Domenico Oricchio wrote on Jun. 24, 2013 @ 10:41 GMT
Thank you for reading my essay, I see that you appreciate my style: it is a satisfaction.

I read and score quickly the essays, I remain a dozen to read and score (I am busy in this moment).

I reread your article, that it is interesting (like many others this, and the others, year).

I am thinking that the dimension reduction near the singularity of the black hole (photon cannot leave the surface of the black hole: dimension 2) cannot be so abrupt, so that can be possible a continuous reduction of the dimension (with transcendetal number dimension); so that near the singularity must be a fractal photon path (used to measure the dimensionality): I think a foam of spherical curvature (like Swiss cheese), that deflect the photon path: an open-cell foam distant from singularity, and a closed-cell foam near the singularity, with the gravitational energy that produces balls of curvature.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 00:46 GMT
Hi Domenico,

Thanks for your comments.

The fractal idea sounds plausible. Great to share these thoughts. Exactly - a photon could not leave the Singularity, so it can only observe more photons coming towards it. It can not be observed from anywhere else in the Universe.

I agree that dimension reduction wouldn't be abrupt with regard to observation, but there are these defined locations where a change in observation occurs as we descend (theoretically) into a Black hole, that match the Fibonacci Sequence numbers.

Best Wishes

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 01:26 GMT
Great discussion over at Kyle miller's page.

His kind comments encouraged more relevant thoughts on my part, which I've copied over to this thread:

I too feel that nature ought to have one singularity, but perhaps as time stops there, then all Black Hole singularities are equivalent to the pre-Big Bang singularity...

Although the possibility that there are no singularities...

view entire post





Anna Maria Richards wrote on Jun. 25, 2013 @ 19:54 GMT
A thought-provoking take on the subject and an intriguing exploration of Pythagorean link between numbers and nature. In an accessible manner which can be convincing and comprehensible even to a layperson, the author successfully presents in few logical steps an attempt to combine the Fibonacci sequence with the questions of reality and its underpinning - information. What seems to be especially appealing is the intellectual effort to prove the possibility of deriving functions inherent to the fabric of realty from binary choices. In this concise essay the author skillfully manages to interweave the great questions of modern-day science such as the theory that information is fundamental to the physics of the universe, Hawking Radiation, entropy and quantum fluctuations. Fine base for further research that might possibly turn out to be an important jigsaw puzzle piece in tackling the problems of fundamental parameters, black hole information paradox and holographic principle.

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 26, 2013 @ 15:21 GMT
Hello Anna,

Thanks for your wonderful review of my essay. I'm delighted by your comments, particularly that you found it thought provoking and that you describe it "as a jigsaw puzzle piece in tackling the problems of fundamental parameters".

Also relieved that you found it concise. These are the very aims I'd hope to achieve!

Best wishes,

Antony




Hoang cao Hai wrote on Jun. 27, 2013 @ 04:17 GMT
Send to all of you

THE ADDITIONAL ARTICLES AND A SMALL TEST FOR MUTUAL BENEFIT

To change the atmosphere "abstract" of the competition and to demonstrate for the real preeminent possibility of the Absolute theory as well as to clarify the issues I mentioned in the essay and to avoid duplicate questions after receiving the opinion of you , I will add a reply to you :

1 . THE...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 27, 2013 @ 10:29 GMT
Hi Hoang cao Hai,

Thanks for this "information".

Antony




Peter Jackson wrote on Jun. 27, 2013 @ 20:47 GMT
Anthony,

Thanks for your comments on my essay blog. I was enjoyed reading yours, which was pleasant and interesting, and I suspect less hard work than mine, which is a bit 'dense'.

I can only take issue with one point, though my issue is further from the current mainstream view than yours. You say;

"...at a Black Hole's event horizon, information is not so free in all spatial directions - no pathways lead outwards."

As an astronomer I have the view that theoretical physics seems about 20-100 years behind in many areas, particularly black holes, which are 'active galactic nuclii' (AGN's) and very closely studied if still not completely understood. They are toroidal, and do have a 'pathway out', ('outflows) though on the perpendicular to the body, precessing around the axis. At full blast these are quasar jets.

But far prom being problematic this may add an interesting angle to your model, as all the information in the galaxy is re-ionized and blasted out to mix with fresh ionized matter to form the new galaxy (or possibly at a larger scale; 'universe').

Such a recycling model which predicted the peculiar CMB anisotropies is implied here; Short AGN paper. It does have some lovely pictures!

Anyway, well done with the essay. Certainly worth a higher score so delighted to assist. Best of luck.

Peter

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 28, 2013 @ 15:47 GMT
Hello Peter,

Thanks so very much for reading my essay & your kind comments (especially with regard to the score). I'm glad you found it interesting too. Yours was very pleasant to read - not too dense at all.

I like your point raised about Black Holes/quasars. Fibonacci does allow for Hawing Radiation with the sequence -1, 1, 0. I agree that there are interesting implications when combined with the Galactic whole - great point.

The "no pathways lead outwards" I was mostly thinking along the lines of purely information from say a particle, which was falling into the Black Hole, so that once it arrives at the event horizon its information can only fall inwards.

The Fibonacci sequence in this context would suggest that information can skip past the singularity and be ejected as (Hawking) radiation.

Thanks again for your time and making this very valid point!

All the Best

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 30, 2013 @ 12:52 GMT
Please take a look at another essay from Hon Jia Koh. He kindly wrote this on his page, which I hope to discuss further here or there:

Thanks Antony. Your essay is a refreshing great read. The use of dimension as pathway for information travel at event horizon is inspiring. A missing part of my essay which I wish to discuss more is about how information, matter and energy translate (travel) and develop (change) over spacetime.

The ability to extend the use of a well-studied area like Fibonacci Sequence to a new horizon is impressive. Mathematics phenomenons have a sublime beauty in manifesting and explaining observable nature that capture the imagination of many great people. Challenging their hidden mysteries and limits could be rewarding and illuminating. From Pythagoras up until before Bernhard Riemann and Einstein, Pythagorean theorem was taken to imply that space was flat as opposed to curved.

Cheers,

Hon Jia



Peter Jackson replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 11:42 GMT
Anthony,

Thanks for the link. Beautiful Essay. There is much good work languishing in the lower and middle regions. He's now deservedly a bit higher.

Peter

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 12:25 GMT
Hi Peter,

It is indeed. This contest is making me dizzy. One minute I'm 9th, then 19th. I dread to think where I'll finish.

Been a great experience reading so many excellent ideas though!

All the best,

Antony




Patrick Tonin wrote on Jun. 30, 2013 @ 16:19 GMT
Hi Antony,

Thank you for your comments on my blog.

I also think that numbers and nature are linked. Your Fibonacci approach is interesting. In my theory, I speculate that the Planck Length has something to do with the golden ratio. I said "speculate" because as soon as you start talking about the golden ratio or the Fibonacci sequence in explaining the Universe, a lot of people,...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jun. 30, 2013 @ 17:56 GMT
Hi Patrick,

My pleasure - I enjoyed your essay. I think that speculation is what this contest is all about as that's the way to answer Foundational questions. I think we've both had a really good go at that! I feels intuitive that Planck and thus other constants of nature should unite in a simple way. Nice to find essays sort of overlap and/or compliment each other.

Thanks for your...

view entire post





David M Reid wrote on Jun. 30, 2013 @ 17:24 GMT
Hi, Antony,

First, thank you for taking the time to read my essay.

Your essay is a fascinating use of the Fibonacci sequence that I had not encountered before. Combining the present use of simplexes in mapping out the information of a black hole with the reduction of dimensions which apparently occurs to an object falling into the black hole in order to avoid the Information Paradox, your further extension of these ideas appear quite natural. Of course, the devil is in the details, and one would want to see if your approach would mesh with the more intricate details of black hole mechanics, but it definitely is worth a try to bring such a concept of dimension conservation into play. The way you interpreted the negative numbers in the sequence was quite elegant. All in all, a thought-provoking essay.

All the best, David

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 30, 2013 @ 18:04 GMT
Hi David,

I am really enjoying reading the other essays. Yours was a pleasure!

Glad you found the Fibonacci approach thought provoking and thanks for your kind comments.

I would like to see if the concept would extend to more intricate details of Black Hole mechanics. This would be a good test of the idea!

Thanks so much for the valuable discussion here!

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jun. 30, 2013 @ 20:04 GMT
A friend sent me the following message:

"Superb rationale and reasoning. One question, what happens to the Higgs field within the event horizon :-) I'll leave you to ponder that one"

Great question - I'll have to think about this one thoroughly. My first instinct would be that it exists as the dimensions do - so information about mass passes out of a Black Hole via the negative sequence.

Great question! Any thoughts on this anyone else?




Georgina Woodward wrote on Jul. 1, 2013 @ 23:36 GMT
Hi Antony,

an interesting interpretation of the essay question. Very different, meant in a good way. The Fibonacci sequence does seem to be a recurrent theme of nature, associated with growth, and popular with many people too. Probably because we find it beautiful. You lost me part way through, though I read on to the end. Black holes and number theory are not favorite topics to contemplate I'm afraid, but I appreciate what you are demonstrating. Its good to see how much interest your essay is getting in this discussion thread. Good luck, Georgina

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 07:27 GMT
Hi Georgina,

Glad you found it interesting and original. Thanks for your comments - I appreciate that you mention the beauty of the sequence as this can be forgotten when simply looking at the numbers, but nature does seem to work this way. Anything I can clarify - I'd be glad to!

Good luck to you too,

Best wishes,

Antony




Sreenath B N wrote on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 09:45 GMT
Dear Antony,

I have down loaded your essay and soon post my comments on it. Meanwhile, please, go through my essay and post your comments.

Regards and good luck in the contest.

Sreenath BN.

http://fqxi.org/community/forum/topic/1827

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 19:30 GMT
Dear Sreenath,

I like that you've considered the question of us as observers - it was an enjoyable essay to read! Also your conclusion that Bit may come from It is nicely explained.

Well done & best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 10:21 GMT
Hello Sreenath,

I've a few I still need to read. I'll look at yours asap.

Regards & good luck,

Antony



Sreenath B N replied on Jul. 4, 2013 @ 03:04 GMT
Dear Antony,

You have written a very imaginative article on the application of Fibonacci numbers to black hole information paradox and have come out of it with flying colors. You know that Fibonacci spiral is also called logarithmic (log) spiral and I have identified this spiral with the path described by particles in the QG field which exists inside black holes. In fact, my last two essays in the last two fqxi essay (especially 2012, Questioning the Foundations) contests deal with the problem of QG. If you have time, please, go through it and you may find it relevant as it helps you in your long voyage to find solution to black hole information paradox.

Wish you all the best in the contest.

Sreenath

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 5, 2013 @ 01:59 GMT
Dear Sreenath,

Thank you for your extremely kind comments. It's especially nice to hear that we have common areas of interest and that the sensible answers arise around the same topic. Your previous essays sound very interesting and I shall read them soon!

I'm delighted to have found somebody else who I believe is looking for the answers to foundational questions in the most logical of places.

All the best in the contest,

Antony



Sreenath B N replied on Jul. 12, 2013 @ 06:45 GMT
Dear Antony,

I think it is time to rate our essays and I have decided to rate your essay and I want to know whether you have rated mine. Please, contact me at, bnsreenath@yahoo.co.in

Best wishes,

Sreenath

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Member Tejinder Pal Singh wrote on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 11:16 GMT
Dear Antony,

I read your essay and found it interesting and imaginative. Perhaps my main concern, a result I am sure of being grounded in conventional physics for far too long, is your early remark :

"Perhaps it isn’t too much of a leap of faith to include reality’s relationship with information, “It

from Bit”, as another of Fibonacci’s attributes.”

Personally, I would say it is an enormous leap of faith, however attractive it may be :-) It would be great if one day we could show that the physical laws of quantum theory and quantum gravity reduce to an aspect of number theory intimately related to the Fibonacci sequence. But right now we are very far from being there, isn’t it?

It would also seem interesting if you could relate the Fibonacci sequence to quantum probabilities and the Born rule, as well as with quantum linear superposition - key principles underlying the qubit and quantum information.

But caveats apart ... it is nice to come across an imaginative idea ...

Best,

Tejinder

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 2, 2013 @ 12:46 GMT
Dear Tejinder,

Thanks for reading my essay and your comment - it is very much appreciated.

I can see that it appears a leap of faith, as I decided to mention in the essay, because I assumed the reader may think so - which is why I'm glad you raise the point.

From my other cosmogony work it is more empirical in nature.

Quantum superposition should be related to the Fibonacci sequence around a Black Hole since spatial dimensions outside allow all theoretically possible states, but according to the sequence (and my extended theory) measurements become limited, reducing to eventually one possible state only at the singularity.

It is very, very logical, but hard to prove though.

In the context of the contest though, I thought information and reality had to be at their mutual most fundamental at a Black Hole/singularity.

I really am grateful for your discussion with me and glad you found it interesting and imaginative too.

Best wishes,

Antony



Member Tejinder Pal Singh replied on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 07:07 GMT
Thanks for your response Antony. Yes now I do see your point about the possible connection between quantum superposition and the black hole. It is interesting undoubtedly.

What I had in mind is also the situation where there is no black hole, say in the laboratory - where too we see breakdown of superposition during measurement. Could you think of a way to relate the sequence and superposition, in this context?

My best wishes for your success in the contest,

Tejinder

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 08:36 GMT
Hello Tejinder,

Great question! I think in this case I’d utilise the simplex representation again, because simplexes are what I utilised in the parent theory to this, where I partly unified gravity, electromagnetism, weak and strong forces. This also gave entangled spin results of a cosine rather than linear nature based on geometry.

Anyway, the theory would suggest that simplex geometry is at the foundation of particles, such that rather than hidden variables, we have fixed constant geometry, this could explain entanglement too.

In the context of wave function collapse, the particle would be observed as, for example, a 2D geometric entity in 3D space (4d Space-time) with 1D vacant.

Overall this gives the particle 3D of spatial information about its overall characteristics. But when measurement is carried out either the 2D or 1D component is observed only. So again dimensionality plays a part in observation/being observed. In this instance the sequence 1, 2, 3. But for Photons and Neutrinos this ought to extend down to 0, 1, 1. Further, there is the expectation that the negative numbers represent antimatter.

Best wishes for the contest too!

Antony




James Lee Hoover wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 18:22 GMT
Antony,

If given the time and the wits to evaluate over 120 more entries, I have a month to try. My seemingly whimsical title, “It’s good to be the king,” is serious about our subject.

Jim

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 19:39 GMT
Jim,

Well written, good use of history and you've certainly told the reader a story. Flowed superbly too. The conclusion that we are not divine yet observers was nice.

You've covered a lot of ground in a very clear and concise way.

Great job!

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 3, 2013 @ 18:35 GMT
Hello Jim,

I have both those attributes - yours is near the top of my list in the coming days.

Best wishes,

Antony




James Lee Hoover wrote on Jul. 4, 2013 @ 20:50 GMT
Antony,

Enjoyed your essay, including your demonstration sequence for mass entering black holes. Does the Chinese study of the ubiquitous presence of the Fibonacci sequence in nature, explaining it in terms of stress engineering, impact your study? It tends to see the sequence as nature's attempt to minimize stress. Thanks for your effort. It's always educational to study views of others, even with my limited knowledge of math.

Jim

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 5, 2013 @ 02:12 GMT
James,

Thanks - I found this link which elaborates on the stress engineering concept you mention.

The maths here is relatively simple, which is always a good starting point for a good theory. I think that minimum energy states are important when we're transitioning from 3-dimensional space towards singularity, as they perhaps define certain "boundaries" or borders which are crossed.

Also this ties in nicely with the entropy aspect of the Fibonacci approach.

Thank you for highlighting another part of the ubiquitous nature of the sequence.

I agree with what you say and think you perhaps have hit on a way to perhaps test my theory.

Best wishes,

Antony




Dipak Kumar Bhunia wrote on Jul. 5, 2013 @ 14:21 GMT
Dear Antony,

Thanks and congratulations for your essay. I like to inform you that, apart from the conventional approaches, we may have also a set of new other rules and unknown constants which are remain hiding ourselves in the world of quanta; and that will reveal if we can restart again from the foundations of de Broglie's universal wave-corpuscular relationship as an inverse information sharing process among quanta. Even we can able to condense all the information in digital nature or "It" in merely two sets (you may say it as 0 & 1 as well). Characteristically, even if one likes to voyage after event horizon to a black hole, the information can be remain intact with the help of those constants. Although this process is not not yet applied in non-inertial conditions.

Thank you once again. I also invite you in my essay.

Regards

Dipak

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 5, 2013 @ 22:17 GMT
Hello Dipak,

Thanks for reading my essay and your comments. Interesting that you envisage information surviving the Black Hole process. I shall read you essay over the weekend.

Best wishes,

Antony




M. V. Vasilyeva wrote on Jul. 6, 2013 @ 13:29 GMT
Antony,

thank you for your kind comments on my essay. I just read your work and found your making Fibonacci sequence going backwards past 0 intriguing. I've never thought of it and only now realized that it continues in the opposite direction with the same values except that every other one is now negative.

In your application of the sequence to black holes you interpret the numbers as dimensions. Couple of years ago I spent some time learning how to visualize 4D and maybe even higher (not a chance lol) and must say that it's hard for me to imagine a negative dimension, even if it is just -1 or -2. I guess I am too attached to the view that +/- mean direction. Thus in my mind the negative numbers in the Fibonacci sequence going backwards appear as mirror reflections. And so I find it fascinating that perhaps also in our view of the picture of reality the real 'its' are intertwined with 'bits' of mere reflections, like in a kaleidoscope, where only some of the pieces of glass are 'real' and the rest are only reflections, but the beauty of the patterns shines in symmetries.

I too love fractals and all things cellular automata to which Fibonacci, in my mind, belongs. It is instructive that Nature conforms its infinite variety to such simple rules. And if so, why not black holes too? I wish I knew more about them to be of use to you. My practical take on them is more in line with Peter's above.

Having read your essay, I am intrigued by possibility that Fibonacci sequence where 'bits' are interchanged with 'its' every other step is how things may be in the world of quantum, and that this may explain some of its mysteries. LOL the idea is so novel to me -- I must sound incoherent.

Thank you again for commenting on my essay and good luck with the competition :)

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 6, 2013 @ 23:57 GMT
Dear Dr Vasilyeva,

Thank you for your comments and I'm glad you found the essay intriguing. Ha - yes the negative dimensionality does sound hard to visualise, as are dimensions generally. However, the -3 represents, as you say, a sort of mirror inverted situation.

The Black hole takes in some matter, represented by 3 (dimensions) in the sequence, then this "decays" backwards to 2 + 1 event horizon and spaghettified structure. Then further "decay" to 0 (singularity) more 1, -1, 2 again and importantly -3.

The -1 I would suggest is Hawking Radiation. Whereby it is produced as the "decay" of the 0 (singularity) to -1, 1, such that the 1 is emitted and the -1 remains inside to cancel other +1 to conserve overall states.

-3 is the neatest part, this conserves spatial dimensionality both inside and outside the Black Hole!

3 in is the same as saying -3 out. Which is similar to what you suggested nature may do. :)

Perhaps this allows information to survive.

Thanks for raising these great points and all the best with the contest too!

Antony



M. V. Vasilyeva replied on Jul. 9, 2013 @ 04:45 GMT
Antony,

lol I'm NOT a Dr. but I've seen one on TV.

Re negative dimensions, I decided after posting in your thread that it is indeed a reflection, exactly like in a mirror. The information is there, but no substance.

As far as black holes go, I tend to think that the number of dimensions actually increase in them. This is because I consider space to be sort of made of 'space stuff' and when you start squeezing this stuff it responds by increasing the number of dimensions. Sort of like you crumble a sheet of paper -- well, not exactly of course, but you can squeeze a large sheet into a small ball, this sort of thing. I think the opposite process is unfolding a.k.a. expansion of space. Say, in the beginning, the universe fit into a point with infinite number of dimensions. As it cooled off, it unfolded and expanded into 4D. Sort of like a crumbled sheet of paper. Makes sense no? :)

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 9, 2013 @ 06:00 GMT
Dear Ms. Vasilyeva,

Sorry, I misread you bio. There are lots on TV (and on here) ;)

This does make sense and would reflect what I found with regard to entropy of Black Holes using the Fibonacci sequence. Also, the -1, 1, 0, 1, 1 part of the sequence means that "decay" from 1 would replenish 1-dimensionality within the Black Hole.

Where you consider the opposite - pre-Big Bang singularity expanding into 4D space-time, the sequence can explain why there are 3 spatial dimensions from nothingness.

The 0D singularity conserves dimensionality allowing 3D to exist, by Black Holes continuing to exist in the current Universe, such that -3D exists, curving space-time. Moreover, the 1 and -1D mirror differs, because of the double 1 (-1) parts of the sequence, allowing multiple points in space (particles) to exist.

3-spatial dimensions perhaps are empirically observed in our current Universe because that is the first dimension (and part of the Fibonacci sequence) where balance is maintained both "sides" of the event horizon.

Best wishes,

Antony :)




Angel Garcés Doz wrote on Jul. 9, 2013 @ 15:45 GMT
Very interesting essay. Perhaps this formula is interesting for your researchs

s= spin

Phi = Golden number

(Phi)^3 = factral dimension of space-time

mpk = Planck mass

Gn = Newton constant = 6.67428 x 10^-11

+-e = electric charge

Im(Zeta1(s)=0)= imaginary part of the first zero of riemann zeta function

s= 0.5 +14.134725141734693i; Re(Im) = 14.134725141734693



Regards

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 9, 2013 @ 16:09 GMT
Thank you Angel,

I will keep hold of it. Certainly plenty of terms you'd expect around Black Holes.

Best wishes for the contest & thanks for writing another interesting essay - so many good ones this year!

Antony




John Brodix Merryman wrote on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 18:37 GMT
Antony,

I have to say I generally avoid most arguments which take current cosmology as a given, because I find it completely out to lunch. For one thing I see time as an effect of action, the only problem is we try to build our perception of it as a sequence from past to future into the model, rather than the actual cause of the change which turns future potential into past circumstance....

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 20:55 GMT
Hi John,

Thanks for your comments. Do these relate to my essay. Forgive me if they do, but I can't see in what context. Perhaps I've read too many essays today, so I'll re-read your remarks another day afresh to see if they are relevant.

Best wishes & many thanks for your time,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 21:09 GMT
Hello John,

I've just had another look at your essay and think this ties in. I'll take a thorough look again at it with your comments. I think I'll then be able to offer an explanation of my essay that will be mutually beneficial.

Best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 15:08 GMT
Hi John,

You wrote - "Given all the major patches to keep it working, from inflation to dark energy, not to mention everything from time traveling wormholes to multiverses springing out of it, it is all bizarre beyond belief".

It being current cosmology. I agree there are too many patches, and I don't think inflation, dark energy multiverse nor wormholes make any sense.

In fact my model only partly explained with regard to information around black holes,bodes explain things more simply. It partly unifies the four forces of nature and resolves the three paradoxes of cosmogony.

My essay doesn't hint at agreeing with any of these classical phenomenon, but does agree with current empirical data.

Best wishes,

Antony




Anonymous wrote on Jul. 10, 2013 @ 21:52 GMT
Antony,

I have read your essay and commend you on what appear to be original ideas about information and black holes. You have read my essay so you probably realize that I focus on nonlinear gravity at the particle level, (where few other researchers spend much time) and I really have no expertise in black holes. Your linking dimensionality to the Fibonacci numbers is unique, as far as I can tell. You seem to have struck a chord with a number of others! I am agnostic on the black hole information problem.

One of the comments above questioned the applicability of the binary base to the real universe. My approach to information is based on a transfer of energy from a source to a detector, where the energy either triggers a threshold (changing or 'informing' the local structure, thereby registering information) or not. This provides the two possibilities represented by 0 and 1 and therefore establishes a binary basis fundamental to a physically real (energy-based) universe.

You have a number of interesting comments on this page. I'm pleased that, per Gupta's essay, you've concluded that, "at the very least, I would not say that information is likely more fundamental than reality itself." I concur.

I also agree that Eckhard Blumschein's essay is excellent and it is good to be consistently aligned with his points.

And you say (per Kyle Miller's page): "I too feel that nature ought to have one singularity [...] although the possibility that there are no singularities works well too." I agree with you here. I've been reading papers recently that claim no black hole singularities. They are somewhat convincing. On the other hand, I'm not bothered by a possible singularity at the 'point' of creation of the universe.

Patrick Tonin, above, says: "I also think that numbers in nature are linked." As I develop in my essay, based on the existence of energy thresholds and local structures, it's easy to create logic circuitry (in silicon or in neurons) that leads to counters and hence, Peano-like, to all integers, and, per Kronecker, to all math. Thus I view numbers as emerging from physical reality, but they are clearly our best language to describe reality and to reveal new features of reality.

Finally, I think the best measure of the quality of your essay is all the thoughtful comments by the other essayists above.

Congratulations,

Edwin Eugene Klingman

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John Brodix Merryman replied on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 01:59 GMT
Antony,

I realize it isn't a clear response to your quite intelligent piece, but I don't come at physics from a mathematical or even particularly scientific perspective, but rather after studying history, politics, culture, etc, I came to the realization how much of it arises from physical principles. So in studying physics, I then came to realize how much cultural and social influences dominate in it and the tendencies toward bubble and herd type thinking. Foolishly thinking there would be interest in such different perspective, I have come to realize that is not so.

I should examine your entry on its own terms, but as I am stuck in my own rut to some extent and am trying to find some connection to my own positions.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 10:11 GMT
Hi John,

No problem - it is good to look at these questions from different perspectives. I'll try to think about where our ideas cross over.

Regards,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 10:19 GMT
Hello Edwin,

Thank you for your very kind and encouraging comments. Good point that numbers emerging from reality, yet they are our best language to describe it. Again a chicken/egg or even fundamentally equivalent conclusion that is extremely logical.

Great term - black hole information problem agnostic, we all are I guess! I'm glad that we both approach binary with the view of detected/observed or not as a way the Universe works.

Again - thank you very much for the great comments and I wish you all the very best in the contest,

Antony




Steven P Sax wrote on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 03:29 GMT
Antony,

Thank you for a very thought provoking essay; I like intelligent pieces like yours that can relate number theory to physical systems. Quantum theory does this in several contexts, but I haven't seen the Fibonacci sequence utilized in black hole analysis like you showed here - this is very original and interesting. I also liked the earlier post from Angel Doz, and I too am fascinated in the connection between Riemann's zeta function and the Fibonacci sequence, especially in regard to physical phenomena. Seeing that the golden ratio is directly related to the Fibonacci sequence, I was wondering if you've seen its connection in other physical phenomena as well? I'm very curious about the connection between geometry and statistics as relates to physical phenomena, and I discuss this connection briefly in my essay. Finally, your derivation of entropy in particular with the negative dimensionality, to then explain why the universe tends toward wanting information to go into a black hole, is very intriguing. This is a great topic, and I hope you have a chance to see my essay as well.

Thanks again, and best wishes :)

Steve Sax

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 10:36 GMT
Hello Steve,

Thanks for reading my essay. I will read yours as soon as possible too and comment over on your page. I'm glad you found it of interest and thought provoking the way number theory might be applied to physical reality.

In answer to your question, I have seen the sequence connected elsewhere - actually before I applied it to Black Holes for this essay. I developed a theory of everything that also solves the paradoxes of cosmogony and the Fibonacci sequence emerged naturally, so a friend/colleague suggested I enter this contest.

Basically the simplex geometries can represent electric charge and mass of the proton, neutron and electron, as well as explain beta decay and strong force. Also a nascent black hole mechanism emerges, which explains why Neutron stars collapse - without disobeying Pauli exclusion.

I'm so glad you mention entropy, as I feel it does indeed suggest an arrow of time, but further, the way it seems to limit dimensionality to 3 spatial dimensions is pleasing - I wasn't expecting so much "information" from the exercise.

Thanks again and speak to you over on your page,

Antony




Christian Corda wrote on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 13:18 GMT
Dear Antony,

As I promised in my Essay page, I have read your Essay. I find it is intriguing and complementary to my one. In fact, the conclusion is the same for both the Essays: black holes are information preserving. I have been always fascinated by Fibonacci sequence and Golden ratio. Thus, I do not think that the link between Fibonacci and Wheeler is to much speculative. Instead, it has been a stroke of genius constructing a beautiful Essay on such a link. On the other hand, conjectures have been always fundamental in developing science. I enjoyed a lot in reading your work, thus, I am going to give you a high score.

Good luck in the Contest!

Cheers,

Ch.

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 16:12 GMT
Dear Christian,

Thank you very, very much - these comments have made my day! Including the score, but also the good point about conjectures being fundamental in developing science. Hopefully we will be able to prove a few from this contest, as there is some fine work on here.

I really enjoyed your essay and pleased that we reached the same conclusion. Black Holes surely ought to conserve information. Fibonacci seems to crop up everywhere, so glad you appreciated it in this context. I too will give you a high score.

Best of luck in the contest and pleased to "meet" you :)

Cheers,

Antony




Christian Corda wrote on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 16:58 GMT
Dear Antony,

I am also pleased to "meet" you in this beautiful Essay Contest. I am happy that my comments have made your day.

Yes, I think that the Universe requests that Black Holes must conserve information. Concerning the issue that conjectures are fundamental in developing science, a great aphorism by Einstein claims that "Imagination is more important than knowledge".

Cheers,

Ch.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 11, 2013 @ 17:31 GMT
One of my favourite Einstein quotes! :)

Cheers again,

Antony




Armin Nikkhah Shirazi wrote on Jul. 12, 2013 @ 12:04 GMT
Dear Antony,

I just read your essay. You write well, and the idea that fibonacci numbers might play an even more fundamental role in nature than we thought does not seem so implausible. Also, the notion that instead of going from 3 dimensions to 0 dimensions we must go sequentially to lower dimensions by increments of one dimension is at the core of the framework that I work on....

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 12, 2013 @ 14:08 GMT
Dear Armin,

Thanks for reading my essay and your comments. Glad you find it original and liked the writing style.

It’s interesting that you too find that dimensionality reduces in increments from 3 to 0. The dimensionality of 2 and then 1 inside a Black Hole refers to observation. At the event horizon, say a particle, can no longer release information outwards away from the Black...

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Angel Garcés Doz wrote on Jul. 12, 2013 @ 22:01 GMT
For everybody, and especially for Steven P Sax and the autor of this great essay respect to the fundamental role of fibonacci numbers and number theory

The neutrality of vacuum due to electric chargue implies the true of Riemann hiphotesis

In other words the meutrality of vacuum for virtual chargued particles is equal to:

Sum(n =1,infinity [mpk/sqr({ +- e}^2/Gn)]

x...

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 13, 2013 @ 20:18 GMT
Hello Angel,

Thanks for the very kind comments! I'm glad that you, Steve and I (as well as others) are finding common ground in the most fundamental of areas of theory.

Best wishes,

Antony



Angel Garcés Doz replied on Jul. 15, 2013 @ 12:09 GMT
The entropy of a black hole has a direct connection to the Fibonacci sequence, given by the following equation:

[equation]

The entropy of a black hole has a direct connection to the Fibonacci sequence, given by the following equation.Looking at this equation, it follows immediately that: 1) Increasing the spacetime curvature, given by 1 / R ², then entropy increases. That is the...

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attachments: images.jpeg

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 13:09 GMT
Hello Angel,

Thanks for this. Some great ideas here! I've also found that the sequence wants to skip past singularity state, and the way you explain Hawing Radiation sounds reasonable too.

Best wishes,

Antony




Chris Granger wrote on Jul. 15, 2013 @ 19:29 GMT
Antony,

Awesome; compelling, original, insightful, and wonderfully written.

I'll have a lot more to say on your essay when I get additional bandwidth, but wanted to let you know that I greatly enjoyed it. In my view, certainly one of the most interesting essays I've encountered in this contest so far (and I'll be sure to elaborate on why that is in a future post).

Chris

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 13:13 GMT
Hello Chris,

Thanks for the extremely kind praise. Very much appreciated. I too really enjoyed your essay, which I think deserves to do extremely well in the contest!

Look forward to further discussion when bandwidth permits ;)

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 13:05 GMT
Hon Jia Koh wrote the following in their essay thread:

Your essay is a refreshing great read. The use of dimension as pathway for information travel at event horizon is inspiring. A missing part of my essay which I wish to discuss more is about how information, matter and energy translate (travel) and develop (change) over spacetime.

The ability to extend the use of a well-studied area like Fibonacci Sequence to a new horizon is impressive. Mathematics phenomenons have a sublime beauty in manifesting and explaining observable nature that capture the imagination of many great people. Challenging their hidden mysteries and limits could be rewarding and illuminating. From Pythagoras up until before Bernhard Riemann and Einstein, Pythagorean theorem was taken to imply that space was flat as opposed to curved.




Vladimir F. Tamari wrote on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 13:17 GMT
Dear Anthony. Hello, and apologies if this does not apply to you. I have read and rated your essay and about 50 others. If you have not read, or did not rate my essay, The Cloud of Unknowing please consider doing so. With best wishes.

Vladimir

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 14:59 GMT
Dear Vladimir,

Yours was one of the first I read. Great work! Looks like you're doing very well in the contest. Well done & thanks for reading my essay too.

Best wishes,

Antony




john stephan selye wrote on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 14:26 GMT
Hi Anthony -

It's very interesting to see the Cosmos expressed in a system based on numbers. You make this approach intriguing even to non-mathematicians. No small accomplishment.

The 'chicken and egg' relation of It and Bit you describe, echoes my own view of their correlation in a greater energy field.

I hope you'll be kind enough to read and rate my essay which accounts for many of the phenomena you describe, but more structurally - or in physical terms, if you will.

All the best,

John

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 14:48 GMT
Hi John,

Thanks for reading and the kind comments. That's the beauty of the Fibonacci sequence, not only does it appear everywhere in nature, but it is also simple.

I'll be reading all remaining essays - about 40 left I think - so I'll make sure yours if next. I will leave a comment over on your thread.

I too have a theory where there is geometric structure going some way to answering many of the I solved problems in physics, so I think I'll enjoy your work.

Best wishes,

Antony



john stephan selye replied on Jul. 17, 2013 @ 14:23 GMT
Hi Anthony -

Thanks for stopping by my page and reading my essay. Your kind comments were most appreciated.

I only wish we could permit ourselves a more detailed analysis of each other's work - but there are so many works to read, and to rate, in order to make the contest as valid as possible for everyone.

Thanks again, Anthony - and best of luck in the contest!

John

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 19, 2013 @ 10:58 GMT
Agreed - no problem John.

Best wishes to you too!

Antony




Angel Garcés Doz wrote on Jul. 16, 2013 @ 20:39 GMT
The Higgs Vacuum, the Higgs boson, the seven extra dimensions and the fibonacci serie,limited to the five fibonacci numbers divisor of 240, Kissing number in 8d, and the 240 non zero roots of group E8.

mh = Higgs boson ; mVH = value of Higgs vacuum ; me = electron mass

1)

[equation]

2)

[equation]

3)

[equation]

4)...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 17, 2013 @ 09:41 GMT
Hello Angel,

This reminds me of some work I carried out around Coxeter and 5-dimensions where the answer was 40 for the kissing number.

Very impressive way to utilise this scheme!

Regards,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 17, 2013 @ 09:43 GMT
Angel,

Does it tell us anything with regard to the Leech Lattice and even higher dimensions than that?

Best wishes,

Antony



Angel Garcés Doz replied on Jul. 17, 2013 @ 13:06 GMT
Dear Antony: yes are one very clear and exact conections from leech lattice in 24d and the Higgs vacuum value, mVH ( ratio to electron mass. The particle less massive and with electric chargue.And absolutely stable)

24d= DIM(SU(7))/2= DIM(SU(5))=4d!

Fn= Fibonacci numbers

240= lattice 8d







Regards

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 17, 2013 @ 13:48 GMT
Thanks Angel,

Wow! There certainly does seem to be a nice relationship. Even better, because you've predicted the mass of Higg's and if it matches refined data over time, you're onto a winner!

I wish I could handle mathematics as fluently as you. The links you've shown are strong, certainly don't seem coincidence.

I used the Koide formula along with the simplex geometries to relate the mass of the proton, neutron and electron from an expected 1/2 value to a result of 0.49999994.

I like this sort of way numbers relate to the real world!

Nice work!

Antony




Anton Biermans wrote on Jul. 18, 2013 @ 02:43 GMT
Hi Anthony,

If nothing can escape from behind the event horizon of a black hole, no photons nor gravitons so an outside observer cannot interact with what's inside, then to him all positions within the horizon would be physically identical. Though such a thing is possible in a mathematical space where all points are defined to be identical but for their coordinate numbers, this is impossible in a physical space where different points by definition are different physically, so the diameter of the event horizon cannot be non-zero so a black hole doesn't have an event horizon. I'm afraid that there's something wrong with general relativity, that part of it describes the physics of a fictitious universe (see my post at this thread).

I do, however, agree with your statement that ''It and Bit appear equally fundamental - a sort of ''chicken and egg'' relationship.''

The information as embodied in particle properties (which can be thought of as internalized rules of behavior, the expression of laws of physics) in a self-creating universe must be the product of a trial-and-error evolution. If 'its', particles, particle properties must be as much the cause as the effect of their interactions, of a continuous energy/information exchange, then information only can evolve, become information when molded into material particles and tested in actual particle interactions: only such information survives which enables its embodiments to survive, to manifest themselves as real particles. So you cannot have one without the other indeed.

Best, Anton

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 18, 2013 @ 09:22 GMT
Hi Anton,

Thanks for reading and your comments. I'm not sure event horizons don't exist. Certainly observation horizons are very real, and indirect evidence does indeed point to black hole existence too..

However, this type of relationship ought to apply to particles too, so should become evident from particle collisions as you correctly state.

Also computer simulations using simple parameters from my more comprehensive theory should produce a Universe where Fibonacci sequence is produced and Black Holes occur.

Thanks again for being so kind as to read and comment. I'll take a look at the link you've left.

Nice to "meet" you and best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 18, 2013 @ 09:24 GMT
Also, some matter does escape as Hawking radiation. But nice to see somebody else conclude Bit and It are equally fundamental.

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 18, 2013 @ 09:28 GMT
One quick question. Why can't a black hole have a non zero diameter? A singularity is zero in size, but the black hole as a whole does have size.

Interesting point though.




Don Limuti wrote on Jul. 19, 2013 @ 16:50 GMT
Hi Antony,

I like your essay connecting the Fibonacci sequence with information storage in black holes.

The concept of black holes and their link to singularities seems to be shifting these days. My own viewpoint is that there is no singularity and that the entity that is a black hole can be viewed equivalently as a mass with a radius or as a ball of energy with a wavelength. I do not know if this would be of benefit to your thesis, if you think it may check out:

http://www.digitalwavetheory.com/DWT/39_The_Schwarzschild_Ra
dius.html

Thanks for your essay,

Don Limuti

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 19, 2013 @ 18:35 GMT
Hi Dom,

Thanks for the kind comments and link. I'll take a look. The singularity can be skipped in this model while still being mathematically allowed. The model suggests information can't be there, but instead remains in flux, whether there is a physical black hole, mass with a radius or just a ball of energy expressed by wavelength. So hopefully the sequence fits well with many other schemes.

Thanks again and best wishes for the contest! Really liked your essay.

Antony




Angel Garcés Doz wrote on Jul. 19, 2013 @ 18:43 GMT
A black hole have not singularity

Singularity = infinite wawe lengths with limit zero= energy infinite

This problem is equal to renormalization metod of quantum

The fusion GR-Quantum will be for quantization of space-time with a minimun length, time and mass

The power evaporation of a black hole and de fibonacci serie

P= (h x c^6)/15360 x Pi x Gn^2 x...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 19, 2013 @ 21:06 GMT
Hi Angel,

Indeed this is a problem around singularities and Planck scale. I think that's why 0 dimensionality is a problem for any information including mass to exist at. So skipping over this such as my Fibonacci theory suggests resolved it.

No information sits there but it does exist as a driving force to recycle information back into Hawking Radiation.

Best wishes,

Antony




Zoran Mijatovic wrote on Jul. 20, 2013 @ 02:12 GMT
Hello Antony,

Your essay is quite intriguing in so far as it attempts to take number relations which are seen to have an actual correspondence in nature, into the more abstract areas of "conservation of information" and the make up of a black-hole. A challenging exercise which should pay off in a discrete universe. I feel I should not comment further without your permission because the Fibonacci sequence can be easily overlaid on Hierarchical Space-Time without resort to "fewer then three dimensions" or "negative dimensions"; I suspect you see this possibility. I also note some interesting comments posted on your essay. Dr. Klingman's position that "transfer of energy" is fundamental to the nature of information is beyond question, but I would say "exchange of energy" allows us to define the relationship between "observer", "observation" and that which is "observed", but then exchange of energy isn't always apparent. John Merryman's insistence that "time is an effect of action" is also fundamental, but I would say that time is observed, and that makes time an effect driven by the exchange of energy, i.e. an exchange of measurements. These factors may help your thinking with respect to entropy and the second law of thermodynamics as they apply to your conception.

One way or the other, well done!

Regards.

Zoran.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 20, 2013 @ 10:39 GMT
Hello Zoran,

Thanks for your comments.

Best wishes for the contest,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 21, 2013 @ 16:31 GMT
Hi Zoran,

A singularity surely has fewer than 3-dimensions doesn't it? Also, the 2 and 1 dimensionality I spoke of, was with regard to information process and pathways tending away from 3 towards zero. I found that there are definite separate points where information should only exchange at Fibonacci numbers of dimensions.

The negative dimensionality explains (-1) negative energy, hence particles being ejected via Hawking Radiation.

-3 dimensionality explains what happens to the Universe as the Black Hole grows - it loses some curved space-time or shrinks - it gains some space. I.e. it balances perfectly. Dimensionality is conserved.

Best wishes,

Antony




Jonathan J. Dickau wrote on Jul. 20, 2013 @ 03:53 GMT
I enjoyed your essay Anthony.

It was fun to read and engaging. I think you were a bit imprecise in some of your Physics, or lack a fuller understanding for a more detailed description, but it was a nice job overall. The journey down the Black Hole was great up to a point, but what goes on once the event horizon is crossed could be a little different from what you describe. However; I'm not going to jump in and check. Besides; if I did (and somehow survived!) I could never tell you what I found.

But then again; Fibonacci continues... So maybe my tale would too.

All the Best,

Jonathan

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 20, 2013 @ 10:47 GMT
Thanks for your comments Jonathan,

Glad you enjoyed it. I'd opt for my description needing to be more detailed rather than imprecise. Obviously we can't say what happens inside a Black Hole. However, we can extrapolate these types of observation/being observed pathways. Good point though.

I realise the mention of spaghettification past the event horizon isn't always the case - sometimes this happens outside the black hole. The point isn't this effect, but the way all pathways eventually tend towards 1-dimensionality - or at least hinted at by extrapolation as said.

I make this point, because for example, the Big Bang is an extrapolation too. We can never measure, but we have other data which tells us.

If I have indeed been imprecise, please let me know where, so I can either clarify things, or re-assess the theory.

Best wishes,

Antony




sridattadev kancharla wrote on Jul. 21, 2013 @ 14:46 GMT
Dear Antony,

Thanks for posting comments in I to the bit to the it to the bit to the I.. I have ready your essay and liked the way you have interpreted Fibonacci series application on the "relative" reality.

I would like to convey a simple truth that singularity is not only a relative infinity or zero, but absolute equality of everything. Absolute truth is that there is only singularity everywhere and all the relativity is an illusion. This is the absolute mathematical truth of zero = I = infinity. There is only I or singularity in the universe. I creates (Generates), sustains (Orders) and Destroys (Dismantles) everything. I is GOD.

Love,

Sridattadev.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 21, 2013 @ 16:23 GMT
Dear Sridattadev,

I have also found that 0 can display infinite characteristics. I agree that zero/singularity such as that we envisage at the start of time, is still mathematically conserved.

Good points and thanks for reading and commenting too.

Best wishes,

Antony



sridattadev kancharla replied on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 02:59 GMT
Dear Antony,

I was playing with Fibonacci series this evening while sitting in my backyard and came across two other series of numbers. I will put down how I arrived at them.

I wrote the Fibonacci series on a paper up to 12th degree on either side of 0 as follows

-144 89 -55 34 -21 13 -8 5 -3 2 -1 1 0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 144

I virtually folded the paper in my...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 08:18 GMT
Hi Sridattadev,

It is incredible how the sequence yields the golden ratio - yes. You show it well.

Added that no matter how we run with the series it always comes out is important. The fact that we start with 0 and 1 is fine, as it's the purest form, but this ties in nicely with Wheeler's Bit and It information being yes/no or nothing and something, where 1 is just a single option of...

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sridattadev kancharla replied on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 15:51 GMT
Dear Antony and All,

I have generalized the findings and calling it iSeries and is the universal series, Fibonacci series is a subset of this universal series.

I give you all a cosmological iSeries which spans the entire numerical spectrum from -infinity through 0 to +infinity and the simple principle underlying it is sum of any two consecutive numbers (any real numbers) is the...

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Angel Garcés Doz replied on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 20:06 GMT
"This surely does tell us that Fibonacci and the Golden Ratio are built into nature, and that "I" in your case sits well too."

Dear Antony: surely 2000%

solely two examples:

The Monster Group:

Oder Monster Group

[equation]

sum of squares all primes divisors of O(M_G) ,with power > 1

2^2 + 3^2 + 5^2 + 7^2 + 11^2 + 13^2 = 377 = 14Th Fibonacci...

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sridattadev kancharla replied on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 21:47 GMT
Dear All,

As per Antony's suggestion, I searched google to see how Fibonacci type series can be used to explain Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity and found an interesting article.


d-super.pdf' target='new'>The-Fibonacci-code-behind-superstringtheory

Now that I split the Fibonacci series in to two semi series, seems like each of the sub semi series corresponds to QM...

view entire post


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Anonymous wrote on Jul. 22, 2013 @ 22:15 GMT
Hello Antony

Well written, and very readable. I think it would be nice to be able to show how the universe might have an action that produces this sequence as a model of a physical reality. In some ways, a universe that adds aspects of its history to evolve is what we find in our own universe. How this occurs is considered in my Armchair Universe.

Best wishes

Stephen Anastasi

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 23, 2013 @ 13:54 GMT
Hello Stephen,

Thanks for the kind comments. I'll take another look at your essay in this context. Thanks for answering my question over on your thread.

I do indeed have a way to show how the Universe produces this sequence!

Essentially it is 0 decaying to -1+1 (in the sequence) then asymmetry occurs forming particles of mass.

The action is a quantum fluctuation of nothingness which increases entropy.

The beauty is that we conserve symmetry overall, but create asymmetry too!

My theory away from the essay explains more, but this essay entry hints at many more answers that can arise from this approach.

I'd suggest that instead of thinking of it as an action, it is the Universe doing what comes naturally - increase in entropy- even when we consider nothingness or a zero entropy pre-Big Bang singularity.

Best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 23, 2013 @ 14:04 GMT
I'm glad you raised this, as it highlights the cosmogony aspect to my work. I'd suggest nothingness fluctuates in precisely this way towards the negative part of the Fibonacci sequence producing the asymmetries that can be explained by simplex geometries.

We can partly unify the four forces of nature and relate the masses of the proton, neutron and electron to 99.999988% against prediction. Furthermore, over the past 4 years as new data has emerged on these masses, the figure has improved more!

Also the theory is potentially testable if a suitable computer simulation can be ran.

Regards,

Antony




sridattadev kancharla wrote on Jul. 23, 2013 @ 12:02 GMT
Dear Antony and All,

Enjoy the absolute truth of the self. Thou art that.

Love,

Sridattadev.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 23, 2013 @ 13:39 GMT
Thanks Sridattev - Antony




Helmut Hansen wrote on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 09:16 GMT
Dear Antony,

you have visited my FQXI-site. Here is my comment to your paper: I agree with you that the Fibonacci number is of fundamental physical importance. My approach to it may help you to understand your approach more deeply.

The foundation of my approach or view is the Fibonacci Spiral: It is built up - as you know - by a series of squares that are including a corresponding series of circular arcs. I could identify the first geometrical element of this series (i.e. the biggest one) as a physical blueprint of space, time and the velocity of light (c = 1).

In my paper "The Hidden Face of c, or The True Meaning of the Kennedy Thorndike Experiment" I've sketched this idea. You can google it easily...

I wish you good luck for your very interesting paper.

Regards

Helmut

P.S. I've rated your paper - of course - high.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 15:46 GMT
Dear Helmut,

Thank you very much for the kind comments and rating. Glad to see so many people share the view of Fibonacci's fundamental nature in reality. It is fitting that c, as you have found is connected too. This is also very interesting like your paper overall.

Well done and best wishes too,

Antony




sridattadev kancharla wrote on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 13:49 GMT
Dear Antony All,

I am attaching the iSeries that I have envisioned and how it shows the DNA structure in its sequence.

Its interesting to see the singularity is in the base seed of zero and how it is all pervasive all through out the structure. I have been telling that I is that nothing which dwells in everything and this DNA structure seems to prove that notion. Singularity is right with in the duality. Absolute is right with in the relativity. This proves that both of these states are interconnected and are the source of life.

Love,

Sridattadev.

attachments: 1_iDNASeries.bmp

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 15:50 GMT
Dear Sridattadev,

Thanks for the attachment. Good to see you applying your work to nature in every corner of science. This is what the contest wants to encourage. The more areas something so simple, yet elegant applies, the less it can be ignored as simply abstract. Interesting.

Nice work,

Antony



sridattadev kancharla replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 12:49 GMT
Dear Antony and All,

Here is more empirical proof of my findings.

Seems like I found something interesting in the DNA structure related to Fibonacci series as I was seeking it

Please see this video DNA-RNA

2 prime

3 prime

5 prime

2,3,5 are the numbers of Fibonacci series.

DNA is not just limited to life on this planet, its all over the...

view entire post


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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 20:09 GMT
Hello Sridattadev,

Thanks for sharing. I'll take a look at the video.

All the best for your writing,

Antony




Than Tin wrote on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 22:32 GMT
Hello Antony

Richard Feynman in his Nobel Acceptance Speech (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/19
65/feynman-lecture.html)

said: “It always seems odd to me that the fundamental laws of physics, when discovered, can appear in so many different forms that are not apparently identical at first, but with a little mathematical fiddling you can show the...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 24, 2013 @ 23:33 GMT
Dear Than Tin,

Thanks for you comments and exemplifying that the nature of the Universe is often seen, even at the highest professional levels, as simple natural occurrences.

I'll take a look at your paper very soon! Sounds intriguing!

Best wishes,

Antony




Thomas Howard Ray wrote on Jul. 25, 2013 @ 18:36 GMT
Hi Antony,

Intriguing essay. (And thanks for kindly commenting on my site.)

There are a couple of things I don't understand. Bekenstein and Mayo demonstrated that the black hole is a 1-dimensional information channel, not 2.* The surface -- the event horizon -- is 2-dimensional, because to the observer at a sufficient distance from the horizon, all information on the horizon...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 14:58 GMT
Hi Tom,

Thanks for your excellent essay and sorry for the delay in my reply!

I'm definitely not talking about naked singularities at all. So I can't comment on those unfortunately.

Also I'm not considering Black Hole not their event horizons relative to an outside observer. Indeed you make the same point of me that physical interaction is one way!

Open space away from...

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Thomas Howard Ray replied on Aug. 2, 2013 @ 14:17 GMT
Hi Antony,

Sorry it took a while to reply. I have to translate the words into mathematics to understand them.

1. I'm not really sure what you mean by 3-dimensional information. Information is generally perceived to be numeric, i.e., independent of dimensionality. For example, if I communicate the statement 2 + 2 = 4, mathematical convention makes it unnecessary to answer which...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 14:26 GMT
Hi Thomas,

Thanks for your comments - there's a lot there.

I'll reply in separate posts I think for clarity.

Best wishes,

Antony.




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 25, 2013 @ 19:34 GMT
Hi Thomas,

Thanks for your comments. Not at all - I don't take them as negative and thanks for kind comments.

In fact I can easily answer all these points - which is what is nice about these discussion threads. Albeit I don't have time right now - in work after a 72 hour week, so I'll post another comprehensive reply early next week.

Glad you raised them, as it gives me a chance to clarify.

Best wishes and thanks again for reading!

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 25, 2013 @ 19:48 GMT
Thomas,

Also as in Christian's essay, both conclude spacetime-symmetry. See Christian's comments above, that the two essays compliment each other with similar conclusions too.

I look forward to elaborating the very relevant points. Also thanks for your terrific essay.

Thanks again - very much appreciated - have a ncie weekend!

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 14:44 GMT
3.

There is absolutely symmetry around this point! The sequence has -1, 1, 0, 1, 1 which provides this. In fact I explain symmetry between the inside and outside of the BH AND Hawking Radiation's existence as -3, 2, -1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3.

Indeed the arrow of time with regard to entropy comes out of this too. So yes I agree it is not one way. Again it does say this in the essay. Information ought to come out of all Black Holes, it is just it may take longer for larger Black Holes

If anything, I think it is a strength of my essay that it seems to reproduce Hawking! And time! And entropy!

:)



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 14:51 GMT
4.

No miracle in the skipping over 0-dimensionality I assure you. The "decay" mentioned in the essay is 0 -> -1 +1 which is highly symmetrical.

The Fibonacci sequence has -1, 1, 0, 1, 1 so that when we "move" deeper into the Black Hole in the thought experiment, 0 becomes virtually and mathematically.

Please note that there is No difference between 1 in the THREE places it appears in the sequence!

This is very important! This is what I mean by skip over. The 1 becomes conserved. The -1 can make the Black Hole lose mass by Hawking Radiation and the +1 can be emitted.




Jayakar Johnson Joseph wrote on Jul. 26, 2013 @ 16:00 GMT
Dear Antony,

As 0 is recursive with Fibonacci sequence, 0 to 1 is the quantum unit of length for one-dimensional string-matter continuum and seeds the emergence of other dimensions.

With best wishes,

Jayakar

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 27, 2013 @ 07:33 GMT
Hello Jayakar,

Interesting point. I actually considered the mathematical possibility that the recurrent -1, 1, 0, 1, 1 part of the sequence would result in string type properties within the Black Hole, or in a smaller Black Hole result in Hawking Radiation.

Sounds like we may have some comment ground!

I will certainly read your essay early in the week. Only a few more to finish reading.

Best wishes & thanks for reading my essay,

Antony




eAmazigh M. HANNOU wrote on Jul. 26, 2013 @ 17:53 GMT
Dear Antony,

I liked your essay and agree with you that the information is the basis of the reality that we observe.

But in detail, I think the bits are the same that things : they are similar, abstract and physical.

Also, the bits are around us and in us ?

What do you think about ?

I will rate your essay after.

Please visit My essay.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 27, 2013 @ 07:27 GMT
Hello Amazigh,

Thanks for your comments. However, I did not really say that information is the basis for reality that we observe. More that information and reality are equally fundamental with the Fibonacci sequence being shown as the way in which information can be exchanged when reality converges with a Black Hole.

However, it does conclude that we get It from Bit AND Bit zzz from It in this sense. Certainly I'd agree that Bits are around and in us or I couldn't type this to you.

I will read your essay early in the week. I've only a few left to read now.

Best wishes,

Antony




Douglas Alexander Singleton wrote on Jul. 27, 2013 @ 08:25 GMT
Hi Anthony,

I just skimmed your essay and will have a more detailed look, but this is a very interesting idea if I understand correctly -- that as one goes toward the central singularity the number of dimensions *reduces*. An earlier poster in your thread had mentioned the idea that as one goes to higher energy scales/shorter distance scales (i.e. as on falls toward the central singularity) the number if dimensions should increase rather than decrease. This is an idea from Kaluza-Klein theory or string theory that at our current energy scale the higher dimensions have curled up but if one went to larger energy scales these extra dimensions would "uncurl" or somehow manifest themselves. If the large extra dimension scenario in its simplest form had been correct we would have seen evidence of the extra dimensions already. Their non-appearance in this run of the LHC pushes the speculation a bit further "down the road".

But in your essay you go the other route -- dimensional reduction (from 3 to 2 to 1 to 0 at the singularity if I understand correctly). There is in fact some recent interesting work exactly in this direction called dimensional reduction. A nice paper on a possible observable/testable outcome of this dimensional reduction in cosmological space-times is the paper "Detecting Vanishing Dimensions Via Primordial Gravitational Wave Astronomy", Jonas R. Mureika and Dejan Stojkovic, Phys.Rev.Lett. 106 (2011) 101101, e-Print: arXiv:1102.3434 [gr-qc]. They use the dimensional reduction scenario which comes from "lattice gravity" (the first few references of the above paper give the original article where dimensional reduction was proposed). Anyway have a look since this appears closed related to the idea in your essay.

Anyway thanks for an intriguing read.

Best,

Doug

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 13:44 GMT
Hi Douglas,

Thanks for reading and your comments. Interesting point about collider results - good news for what I'm saying.

I'll save those links - thanks for those!

You sum it up well. The reduction along the Fibonacci sequence results from how limited information is in its exchange.

If we imagine two particles outside a BH, then they can both receive & reveal...

view entire post





Marcoen J.T.F. Cabbolet wrote on Jul. 27, 2013 @ 17:00 GMT
Hello Anthony,

I have read your essay and I see that you suggest some applications of the Fibonacci sequence for fundamental physics. I have some questions, though.

1) On page 2, you derive the array 3,2,1,1,0 representing how dimensionality of information exchange evolves as one descends towards a black hole. You then say that this matches the Fibonacci sequence. In itself, that is...

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 14:22 GMT
Hello Marcoen,

These are very good points. Thanks for your comments.

Points 1 and 2 can be answered together.

The fundamental part comes from two places. Te first is that we begin at a singularity or 0 in the sequence. Also that we balance out the sequence conserving numbers, by using the negative part of the sequence.

Indeed the part of the sequence used isn't as small...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 14:24 GMT
Like the nomenclature for your sequence ;)



Marcoen J.T.F. Cabbolet replied on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 20:24 GMT
Hi Antony,

Just playing the devil's advocate: you say that a set with negative dimensionality indeed sounds crazy, but that this is what makes your idea more fundamental. But a mathematician would answer: no, this is what makes your idea wrong, as no such negative dimensionality exists in mathematics.

That is to say: can you give a definition of the dimensionality of a set, such that this can be negative?

Best regards,

Marcoen

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 29, 2013 @ 11:40 GMT
Hi Marcoen,

Thanks for taking the time to discuss, I'm enjoying it, abd it helps clarify the theory.

It is good to play devil's advocate, but I don't consider it wrong, just a new idea, which is what the contest is about.

The negative part comes from the Fibonacci sequence. All positive numbers also have negative square roots, but are generally ignored. Even square root of...

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 14:34 GMT
Another quick point around -1 and -3 dimensionality with regard to information exchange. As we decent into the Black Hole, we lose pathways for exchange, reducing the said dimensionality, such that we need to actually account for these. So the Black Hole remains balanced with the rest of the Universe.

The singularity being 0-dimensional suggests information can't be exchanged at all. However information can pass over this thanks to the 1s surrounding the 0. Negative information exchange hence means that balance or conservation comes from the Black Hole not releasing information as is, but in a time reversed manner. Thus essentially not releasing most information, and when it does as Hawking Radiation, it is in a jumbled form.




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Jul. 28, 2013 @ 15:18 GMT
All,

I'll be reading the last few essays which I haven't yet commented on over the next two days. If I happened to have missed yours or missed a reply, please let me know and I'll be glad to discuss further.

Best wishes,

Antony




Hugh Matlock wrote on Jul. 29, 2013 @ 10:01 GMT
Hi Antony,

Yours was certainly an original approach, and I like the possibility that the Fibonacci sequence is more fundamental than we suppose, but I am not sure I understand everything you describe. You wrote:

> However, any information that passes beyond an event horizon becomes empirically lost.

Essayist Christian Corda claims that it may not be lost. You may want to...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 29, 2013 @ 11:25 GMT
Hi Hugh,

Thanks for reading and your comments. Great questions.

I've looked at Christian's essay and he has looked at mine. We agree with regard to information loss, in that I suggest it seems lost, but actually continue to conclude it isn't. It must always be released even if that takes an seemingly infinite amount of time to an outside observer.

At the event horizon, time...

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James A Putnam wrote on Jul. 30, 2013 @ 18:08 GMT
Hi Antony,

Very nice essay. One does not have to agree with my approach to physics, to receive due credit for clear original thinking. Physics theory requires deep thinking. I enjoyed your novel approach. Good luck in the contest. I have rated your essay.

James Putnam

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 30, 2013 @ 19:15 GMT
Hi James,

Many thanks for your kind comments and rating. There have been some wide ranging approaches, but the whole process has been enjoyable.

Best wishes for the contest and the future,

Antony




Ralph Waldo Walker III wrote on Jul. 30, 2013 @ 22:24 GMT
Hi Antony,

I'm glad I read your essay! I think you're on to something significant in recognizing a relationship between black holes and a Fibonacci sequence. I also agree with your conclusion that black holes represent the 'reverse' of the holographic principle. Personally (and I know you didn't ask) I think that black holes are the 'wombs' of baby universes forming from our own.

I think highly of your essay, and rated it so.

Best to you,

Ralph

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 31, 2013 @ 08:00 GMT
Hi Ralph,

Thanks for the kind comments and rating. Likewise I think highly of your essay and rated it so. I'm glad you enjoyed reading my essay.

I've heard many good arguments that Black Holes are like baby Universes. My thoughts on this don't stray too far either. I imagine that all Black Holes keep growing and never evaporate.

I think they lose some mass, but always gain more - i.e. no micro black holes should ever form, because the potential for the to evaporate by Hawking radiation is too high.

Anyway, the larger Black Holes would then continue to grow until the Universe expands to such an extent that there are only Black Holes and empty space in between (save for virtual particles).

Then all points in space-time become equivalent - even the singularities of the Black Holes.

Then there would be a Big Bang - so one infinitely large Universe with finite observable size at any given point.

Great point to make.

Best wishes and thanks again,

Antony




Antoine Acke wrote on Jul. 31, 2013 @ 18:07 GMT
Dear Antony,

The introduction of the Fibonacci sequence in this contex is a bold enterprise. Although I start in my essay from a very different position, I appreciate your approach.

All the best,

Antoine.

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Jul. 31, 2013 @ 20:20 GMT
Dear Antoine,

Thanks for the link over on your page - I too enjoyed Edwin's essay. It is indeed great to see different approaches to fundamental questions.

My approach is certainly bold, but perhaps tame compared to my theory which partly unifies the four forces and resolves the paradoxes of cosmogony :o)

Anyway thanks and best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:23 GMT
Dear Antoine,

Please see message below from Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:18 GMT.

It is indeed bold, but as you can see from the comments above, it is quite logical. Thanks for the link over on your thread.

Best wishes,

Antony




KoGuan Leo wrote on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 07:11 GMT
Dear Antony,

Brilliant essay! Obviously, we cannot agree on everything but i see some similarity in our ideas.

First, KQID Qbit is (00,1,-1) which is singularity Qbit Multiverse in zeroth dimension at absolute zero temperature that computes and projects Einstein complex coordinates (Pythagoras complex triangles or Fu Xi's gua or Fibonacci numbers!) onto the 2D Minkowski Null...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 11:40 GMT
Dear KoGuan,

Thanks for the very kind comments. Lots of great points to consider here. It does seem we have common ground. I'll take another look in the context you've set out.

Thanks for the fantastic comments.

Best wishes,

Antony

All,

Please take a look at KoGuan's very interesting and relevant paper- It from Bit or Bit from It?.

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Michael Alexeevich Popov wrote on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 13:23 GMT
Dear Antony,

Thank You. Let us imagine a continuation of your n-dimensionality logical game. If rational n-dimensionality ( n = -1,0,1,2,3 and we assume that n is rational number ) is accepted ( i.e. there is a mathematical proof ) we can go further and we may admit a new kind of possible dimensionality, expressed by the square root - 1 and complex numbers ( why not ? Einstein and Hawking use the square root - 1 as an imaginary time / complex time variable u in physics ).Hence, new unexpected physical generalizations are deduced.

Best

Michael

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 13:48 GMT
Dear Michael,

I agree that we can indeed use square roots to explore concepts such as this further. I think these could actually apply in experimental results at colliders. Great idea!

Best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 14:38 GMT
Michael,

I've found similar personally too.

We can see this as a reflection of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, though I've derived a more precise geometry that gives this result. Also this gives exact entangled spin results that are non-linear, but cosine related matching those found experimentally.

Also this type of thinking can relate the masses of the proton, electron and neutron to 99.999988% of prediction.

Kind regards,

Antony




Member Olaf Dreyer wrote on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 18:42 GMT
Dear Antony:

I must say that you have lost me. You start from the point that the Fibonacci series begins with zero and one which are the two states of a classical bit. Fine. But what could possibly follow from that? I really do not get what you are saying.

Cheers

Olaf

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Anonymous replied on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 20:03 GMT
Dear Olaf,

Yes 0 and 1 is the start, and in this case the zero applies to the singularity, as being 0-dimensional. Ten 1 apples to 1-dimensional space. That is the fundamental part. We can't be more fundamental than if talking about a singularity and zero dimensions. That's the bottom up part.

Then I looked from the top down from 3-dimensional space and imagined what happens to any...

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 20:18 GMT
Dear Olaf,

CORRECTED TYPOS BELOW

Yes 0 and 1 is the start, and in this case the zero applies to the singularity, as being 0-dimensional. Then 1 apples to 1-dimensional space. That is the fundamental part. We can't be more fundamental than if talking about a singularity and zero dimensions. That's the bottom up part.

Then I looked from the top down from 3-dimensional space and imagined what happens to any given point in space time. Please note - I'm dealing here with spatial dimensions not time.

As it says in the essay itself, I then went on to envisage what a point in 3D space does. It observes information and releases information too. All across full 3-dimensions. This is empirically known.

Then at or the event horizon a point might observe information outwards from the BH but not below it.

Likewise it can't release information outwards.

So there is a 2-dimensional area that information is both received and revealed.

Then once inside the BH there are two distinct pathways - one where information can only be revealed, the other only received and these are both 1-dimensional.

Then the singularity 0-dimensional, where not information can do anything.

So we have 0, 1, 1, 2, 3.

Te rest is in the essay including the negative part of the sequence.

Hope this clears up things?

Best wishes,

Antony

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William C. McHarris wrote on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 18:43 GMT
Dear Antony,

Congratulations on a clever, novel approach and for an intriguing essay. My one worry is that, although you have a clever mathematical construct, is it really applicable to back holes. There are many more mathematical constructs than physical situations to be explained, and it is not easy to decide which are weeds. On the other hand, it was just such clever playing around with group theory that led to, say, prediction of particle multiplets and an empty hole awaiting the omega-minus particle. The proof of the pudding would be if you were able to make a prediction with this sort of sequencing.

Cheers,

Bill

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 20:12 GMT
Dear Bill,

Thanks for the kind comments. I thought your essay was very good and rated it highly. Nice work!

It ought to indeed be extremely applicable to black holes, as said in the essay, but clarified for Olaf above.

I'm fact this essay theory only came about as an aside for my main area of work, which has partly unified the four forces and resolved the three paradoxes of cosmogony.

It's a geometry based also on simplexes which gives natural asymmetry answering Baryon asymmetry and related the masses of several groups of particles very, very well versus prediction.

For example the electron, proton and neutron to 99.999988% of theory! Further this figure improves with newer results from collider data!

The theory also could be tested in a computer simulation to give dark matter effects and essentially with very few parameters should simulate out Universe.

I hope that helps as it really isn't guess work. Save for I haven't fallen into a Black Hole to check, but it also hints at Hawking radiation, as mentioned in the essay.

We even already expect that pathways verse away from 3-dimensions towards narrower 1-dimensionality.

Please let me know if you'd like to hear more.

Best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 21:07 GMT
Again typos - was rushing out:

In fact this essay theory only came about as an aside for my main area of work, which has partly unified the four forces and resolved the three paradoxes of cosmogony.

AND

We even already expect that pathways merge away from 3-dimensions towards narrower 1-dimensionality.

Antony



KoGuan Leo replied on Aug. 2, 2013 @ 02:05 GMT
Dear Antony,

Yes, I would like to learn more of your theory. Please give me the link. Again fantastic work! I am happy to enter this contest, I am learning so many wonderful discoveries just from our 3 pounds brain and conversing with these great 3 pounders minds.

Best wishes,

Leo KoGuan

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Brian L Ji wrote on Aug. 1, 2013 @ 21:56 GMT
Antony,

I have read and rated your essay with great interests. Linking Fibonacci’s bit with black hole information dynamics is a great idea.

Have you seen this recent paper about Graphene titled "Black Hole in a Pencil", http://news.sciencemag.org/2006/08/black-hole-pencil ? Perhaps some experiments can be proposed.

Brian

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 2, 2013 @ 08:01 GMT
Hello Brian,

Thanks very much for reading and rating. I think I've heard something similar about Graphene so I'll take a look.

The geometry of my theories even fits and the a symmetric tetrahedral type structure suggests a nascent Black Hole mechanism within Neutron Stars!

Thanks & best wishes,

Antony




Michael Alexeevich Popov wrote on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 11:16 GMT
Dear Antony,

Somebody took your 2 comments ( + 1 my answer ) from my blog. Copy of my lost hacked comment you can find in my blog from 3 aug 2013.

Michael

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:26 GMT
Dear Michael,

I noticed the ratings and comment info disappeared yesterday and today when it returned the comments were gone! i hope they manage to fix this. See my comment below from Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:18 GMT

Annoying isn't it! :(

Thanks I'll repost your comments here too!

Best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:27 GMT
Michael's post from his blog:

Dear Antony,

Thank you for high rank. Let me imagine a continuation of your n-dimensionality logical game. If rational n-dimensionality ( n = -1,0,1,2,3 and we assume that n is rational number ) is accepted ( i.e. there is a mathematical proof ) we can go further and we may admit a new kind of possible dimensionality, expressed by the square root -1 and complex numbers ( why not ? Einstein and Hawking use the square root - 1 as an imaginary time / complex time variable u in physics ).Hence, new unexpected physical generalizations are deduced.

( copy of my comment for Antony Ryan by 1 Aug 2013 )




eAmazigh M. HANNOU wrote on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 13:23 GMT
Thank you Antony,

Your essay is very pertinent and relevant.

Bits of Wheeler are eDuality that we observe in everything.

I am writing a book about eDuality that explains all things, even our reasoning.

You said :

« By definition, the first two numbers in the Fibonacci sequence are 0 and 1, and each subsequent number is the sum of the previous two....

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:30 GMT
Thank you Amazigh,

I agree that nothing can exist without its true opposite. In fact my theory away from the contest has baryon asymmetry occur for such that there is NO missing antimatter and suggests that the true opposite exists as part of every particle.

Thanks for your comments and your super essay!

Best wishes,

Antony

Note: - message below wrote on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:18 GMT




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 3, 2013 @ 19:18 GMT
All,

I've lost a lot of comments and replies on my thread and many other threads I have commented on over the last few days. This has been a lot of work and I feel like it has been a waste of time and energy. Seems to have happened to others - if not all.

I WILL ATTEMPT to revisit all threads to check and re-post something.

Please can this be retrieved?

Best wishes,

Antony




Manuel S Morales wrote on Aug. 4, 2013 @ 05:05 GMT
Hi Antony,

My apology for not leaving a message behind when I reviewed and rated your essay highly on July 2. That was a hurried day for me to say the least. I am glad to see that my support of your essay, among many, helped you out in obtaining your much deserved rating.

I believe it was your statement, "Hence, it seems decay onward to 5-dimensions isn’t favoured either symmetrically or asymmetrically, giving 3-dimensionality a limit in our reality and in information exchange." that resonated with me the most.

Best wishes and good luck,

Manuel

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 4, 2013 @ 05:35 GMT
Hi Manuel,

Thanks very much and I'm pleased to see you are so near the top! Well deserved too.

That's a good point you raise. The Fibonacci sequence here seems to match an empirically spatial 3-dimensional Universe. Glad you emphasised this, as it is one of many strong physical points to come out of this theory. So many can only see it from an abstract point of view, but there are indeed real and observable hints this is a way (not the only way) reality works.

Also the scheme ought to be testable via computer simulation. With very few extra pieces of data - i.e. my symmetrical symmetry breaking system.

Best wishes for the remainder of the contest - your comments are much appreciated,

Antony




Branko L Zivlak wrote on Aug. 4, 2013 @ 06:19 GMT
Hi Antony,

Our entire communication is on my essay web page. It is not right to send you publicly speculative Koida upgrades. So, send your email.

Regards,

Branko

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 4, 2013 @ 13:17 GMT
Hi Branko,

No problem. antryanet@outlook.com

Best wishes,

Antony




Kai Olaf Henkel wrote on Aug. 4, 2013 @ 13:20 GMT
Dear Anthony,

realy nice article. I agree with you about the digital construction of the universe in "0" and "1" bit, but I see no reason why the dimensions are limited to 3 or better 4 Dimension (including time)in our universe.

Good lick for the contest.

Dear Kai Henkel

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 4, 2013 @ 17:24 GMT
Dear Kai,

Thanks for your comments. There are many good reasons why the universe is limited to 3 spatial dimensions. I acknowledge 4 dimensional space time. This essay deals with geometry hence only the spatial nature NOT time.

That why 4 doesn't appear spatially and hence ties in with the Fibonacci sequence!

The entropy system on my scheme shows why there should be a limit of 3-dimensions, as mentioned in the essay.

Also, my essay utilises the exchange of information - we don't exchange it along more than 3-dimensional geometry.

Also there are many great reasons generally in physics why 3 spatial dimensions ought to be the limit.

Further, our empirical evidence constantly shows us 3-dimensions of space. There is mathematical evidence why 3 spatial or 4 space time dimensions may be a limit around proofs of kissing numbers too.

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 13:48 GMT
All,

A few people have mentioned that they doubt Black Hole's or singularities existence. Please see below either way:

Indeed we can utilise the Fibonacci sequence away from a black Holes too. Further, the essay hints that singularities perhaps may be avoided and are rather a mathematical trick. However, the jury is out on this. I'd say they do exist, but my essay says information ought to bypass the singularity - so who am I to argue!

My main theory away from the esaay revealed the Fiboancci sequence and 3-dimensional space as what we ought to observe in our universe, (with an extra dimension of time). See the section about the arrow of time and entropy.

The main theory partly unified the four forces and resolves the three paradoxes of cosmogony, with prediction which relates the masses of the Proton, Neutron and Electron to within 99.999988% of the known values. Further, this has improved over the last few years with EVERY new data that comes from mass measurements! A modified Koide formula was used based on my symmetrical symmetry breaking geometry.

There are other more important points in my essay than the black hole, but the mathematical concept of a singularity is used to show why this is a foundational concept in that it is tackling Quantum Gravity type theory.

Best wishes,

Antony



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 13:52 GMT
*** BLACK HOLE DEBATE - Please see comment above ***

Some great points and discussion coming out of this contest!




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 15:10 GMT
Some great questions from Thomas Howard Ray when he replied on Aug. 2, 2013

I've replied to these, as they are very important points I wanted to reinforce.

The arrow of time, entropy and Hawking radiation all arise in my essay, in a very clear, concise and simple way.




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 15:36 GMT
All,

Some have suggested that there ought to be prediction in my essay. Well here's some evidence of this.

These three masses arise from my main theory:

me = 0.510998928 MeV/c2, mp = 625.514697333333 MeV/c2, mn = 298.203666130845 MeV/c2

When put into th Koide Formula we get 1/2 , which is predicted rather than 2/3. To 0.49999994

Please note that these are three very different numbers, not two massive very close numbers and one tiny. Try it with the normal masses of the proton, neutron and electron!

The above numbers are adjusted masses based on Pi and simplex geometry. They relate the Electron, Proton and Neutron masses.

This is all from my main theory which has now shown in my essay what can happen to information when it falls into a Black Hole.




Kyle Miller wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 17:55 GMT
I still am having trouble fully understanding your analysis of what happens beyond the event horizon, however, I would like to reiterate that I find your essay and your ideas to be very original and that I pretty much like anything that has to do with the Fibonacci sequence--your essay included.

- Kyle Miller

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 18:29 GMT
Hello again Kyle,

If you imagine converging pathways, then we can see they tend towards spaghettification. They hence tend towards 1-dimensionality. The sequence it seems confirms this, as you rightly suggest that we can't check. Also it then seems to confirm Hawking radiation, and the entropy analysis suggests an arrow of time!

Thanks for the kind words too.

Best wishes,

Antony




Yutaka Shikano wrote on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 21:05 GMT
Hi Antony,

Seemingly, it is interesting. However, I hope that you will construct theories of black hole and Hawking radiation from the Fibonacci-number based algebra. Is it possible?

Best wishes,

Yutaka

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 5, 2013 @ 21:17 GMT
Hi Yutaka,

Most definitely! Algebra forms a large part of the main theory which resulted in this essay. My unification uses matrices to describe electromagnetism. Nice to see you climb the rankings!

Best wishes,

Antony




Margriet Anne O\'Regan wrote on Aug. 6, 2013 @ 11:10 GMT
Hi Antony from Margriet O'Regan

I use 'triangulations' in a very different way - see my reply to your & Stephen's 'thread' !! in my essay slot.

A distinction I didn't make clear enough in my essay is as follows :-

My own investigations have led me to conclude that ‘information’ is NOT digits – no kind nor amount of them (including any that can be extracted from...

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Lorraine Ford wrote on Aug. 6, 2013 @ 11:26 GMT
Hi Antony,

I found yours to be an interesting essay about numbers, their relationships and properties. You suggest a connection between Fibonacci sequence seed values and Wheeler's 0 and 1; you discuss Fibonacci numbers found in nature (in the structure of plants and bees) suggesting that these numbers and their relationships are a type of information known to nature at some level; and you suggest that Fibonacci numbers are a type of numeric information that relates to the properties of black holes and the reasons for a spatially 3 dimensional universe.

You may recall that in my essay I developed a bit of a case that numbers are things that really exist; they are what I would call hidden information category self-relationships (not that anybody has commented on this assertion either positively or negatively). So I'm interested in asking other people about numbers: I wonder how you see the nature of numbers including Fibonacci numbers i.e. in what sense do you think they exist in relation to physical reality? (I hasten to add that this is not a quiz question that will be marked!!)

I am giving you a good rating. Best of luck in the contest,

Lorraine

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 6, 2013 @ 17:14 GMT
Hi Lorraine,

Thanks very much for your kind comments and rating. I'm also relieved that I won't be marked on the answer to your question as I don't think my nerves can take another contest ;o)

I think you are dead right that hidden information exists. I explain spooky action at a distance as hidden fixed constants, a play against hidden variables.

My geometries explain the cosine non-linear relation between entangled particles in spin Alice/Bob type experiments exactly!

As mentioned to Margriet - I think at least in the case of Fibonacci numbers, that they represent real geometry in the form of simplexes.

From this I get symmetry breaking from complete nothingness, that also conserves the nothingness. In short it solves Baryon Asymmetry.

I think this should apply to all numbers and that they apply to dimensionality and simplexes are the most fundamental geometry in n-dimensions.

Great question!

Best wishes for the contest!

Antony



Lorraine Ford replied on Aug. 9, 2013 @ 00:08 GMT
Hi Antony,

Congratulations for doing so well in the contest!

Thanks for replying to me about numbers. Are you saying that numbers derive from or even ARE geometry, which in turn comes out of nothing because of symmetry? Does this mean that you have a platonic view?

Cheers,

Lorraine

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 10, 2013 @ 10:58 GMT
Hello Lorraine,

Many thanks. It was touch and go, as there seemed to be plenty of low votes late on. But I expected the rough with the smooth so to speak. There is talk of collusion to group vote, which is a shame. I'm furious that somebody else thought I was part of one such group. I think there is an element of human nature that if you're nice about somebody, they may be inclined to be nice to you, but that's just how some people lead their lives.

Anyway getting back to science ;)

I'm suggesting that numbers correspond to information exchange in different dimensionalities with regard to the Fibonacci sequence in the first instance.

But I then explored the concept further, so that the simplest geometries in n-dimensionality are the simplexes, which of course are self-dual Platonics in their respective n-dimension.

So I proposed that the information content at n-dimensionality in its simplest form is the simplex, going on to use this to represent entropy, where we get the interesting results in the table as we drop downwards along the sequence.

The coming out of nothingness is because the 0-simplex is an infinitesimally small point, which the sequence passes through. However, I have other research which similarly suggests equivalency between 0-simplex and higher simplexes - they all conserve the central point for instance.

So the Fibonacci numbers I'd say are linked to geometry. However, curiously as shown in the table the +1 pattern remains only up to 3 spatial dimensions.

I could go on for hours about my symmetry breaking system that considers 3-dimensions a limit. I'll just summarise here that we condsider the 1 and 2-simplexes in 3-dimensional space and Electromagnetism, Mass, Weak interaction and Residual Strong are all shown. Further, a mass relationship between the Proton, Neutron and Electron to 99.999988% of prediction is obtained.

Great questions!

Cheers,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 6, 2013 @ 17:03 GMT
Dear Margriet,

I agree the contest is fantastic for sharing ideas! I like your explanation. It fits with my essay in that the numbers in the Fibonacci sequence represent geometry, in this case the simplexes, being the simplest form of the n-dimensionality.

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 10:47 GMT
Dear All,

I'd just like to thank you for reading and commenting on my essay! I find it an honour that you have considered my reasoning. I've thoroughly enjoyed reading ALL the other essays!

Best wishes to you all for you future's.

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 10:49 GMT
I'd just like to sum up my essay with one of my favourite comments above:

"A thought-provoking take on the subject and an intriguing exploration of Pythagorean link between numbers and nature. In an accessible manner which can be convincing and comprehensible even to a layperson, the author successfully presents in few logical steps an attempt to combine the Fibonacci sequence with the questions of reality and its underpinning - information. What seems to be especially appealing is the intellectual effort to prove the possibility of deriving functions inherent to the fabric of realty from binary choices. In this concise essay the author skillfully manages to interweave the great questions of modern-day science such as the theory that information is fundamental to the physics of the universe, Hawking Radiation, entropy and quantum fluctuations. Fine base for further research that might possibly turn out to be an important jigsaw puzzle piece in tackling the problems of fundamental parameters, black hole information paradox and holographic principle".



Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 18:28 GMT
This explains the rating numbers dropping




Paul Borrill wrote on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 18:54 GMT
Dear Antony,

I have now finished reviewing all 180 essays for the contest and appreciate your contribution to this competition.

I have been thoroughly impressed at the breadth, depth and quality of the ideas represented in this contest. In true academic spirit, if you have not yet reviewed my essay, I invite you to do so and leave your comments.

You can find the latest version of my essay here:

http://fqxi.org/data/forum-attachments/Borrill-TimeOne-
V1.1a.pdf

(sorry if the fqxi web site splits this url up, I haven’t figured out a way to not make it do that).

May the best essays win!

Kind regards,

Paul Borrill

paul at borrill dot com

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Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 7, 2013 @ 19:02 GMT
Dear Paul,

There is a link page http://fqxi.org/popups/forum/links.

I've read and commented on yours and the other 180. 182 in total. I can't believe there were so many great essays!

Really enjoyed it.

Best wishes,

Antony




Daryl Janzen wrote on Aug. 8, 2013 @ 11:30 GMT
Dear Antony,

Sorry about my Thumper's dad's response to your essay. In some respects I did like it; but when it comes to black holes I've got so many personal issues that I just couldn't see how to respond without feeling like I was on a psychiatrist's couch. With that said, if you are interested to hear all I have to say on the matter, please feel free to email me at the address on my essay.

All the best,

Daryl

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 8, 2013 @ 22:00 GMT
Dear Daryl,

No problem. I had to Google that term, but i can't find a Thumper's Dad response ;)

I will email you at some point soon, as I'd like to hear different points of view on this. It doesn't just have to apply to Black Holes though!

Best wishes,

Antony



Daryl Janzen replied on Aug. 9, 2013 @ 02:00 GMT
Right, obviously that was way too cryptic. Why the heck would you have Bambi on the brain at a time like this.

Thumper: He's kinda wobbly, isn't he?

Thumper's mom: Thumper, what did your father tell you this morning...?

Anyway, I meant to say that it's not even like I couldn't say something nice, but whenever I sat down to say something I inevitably ended up going on to say something like "but I find the whole black hole concept so utterly inconsistent..." and launching into something that I just don't think would have been appropriate to get into here.

With that said, my opinion is obviously very unpopular, and will have no bearing on the judging of your essay in the final round. I wish you the best of luck. And please do keep in touch.

All the best, Daryl

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 9, 2013 @ 09:56 GMT
Hello Daryl or should I say Thumper's pal - ha ha.

Firstly congratulations on making the finals!

I think it is good to examine reality from an objective point of view. So any view should not be considered unpopular. That's what I do in my research, I think why something shouldn't work and only if it overcomes those obstacles do I continue.

Tha essay is about more than just Black Holes, in fact in some respects it suggests that singularities might exist mathematically, but information doesn't remain within Black Holes. Also the essay came about from a broader theory about simplex type geometry resolving Baryon Asymmetry and producing an arrow of time.

Best wishes,

Antony




Jonathan J. Dickau wrote on Aug. 9, 2013 @ 00:16 GMT
Congratulations Antony.

Good luck in the finals!

Regards,

Jonathan

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 9, 2013 @ 09:48 GMT
Many thanks Jonathan and congratulations to you too!

Best of luck to you too in the finals! I'm really looking forward to the judges questions!

Kind regards,

Antony




Lorraine Ford wrote on Aug. 12, 2013 @ 00:34 GMT
Hi Antony,

Thanks for getting back to me about numbers. I am still trying to digest your concept of a number i.e. in what sense it really exists, and how physical reality might apprehend particular numbers as opposed to all other numbers that exist. Also how would you characterize the numbers that we obtain from measurement of fundamental reality e.g. mass or momentum or relative position?

Cheers,

Lorraine

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Author Antony Ryan replied on Aug. 19, 2013 @ 15:44 GMT
Hi Lorraine,

Sorry for late reply!

Great way to think about this! In this respect I'd suggest physical reality apprehends numbers as dimensions. So a singularity is zero with regard to spatial dimensionality. 1-dimension could exist as equivalent if we look at simplexes as fundamental geometry.

The two vertices of a line segment are equidistant to their average position - a point - 0-dimensional simplex. So creating 1-dimension from 0-D conserves 0-D point.

We can indeed then do this equivalency for any n-dimension simplex. However, starting at 0 and moving to the next dimension 1 allows us to then follow Fibonacci.

As you rightly say - why this rather than all numbers?

To answer this I'd point to the negative part of the sequence. The -1, 1, 0. Without this we would be saying that 0D can fluctuate to higher dimensions, but always must fluctuate back down to nothingness again.

If 0D however fluctuates of "decays" to -1 +1 we have two 1-dimensionalities. One positive and one negative (whatever that means).

I'd suggest this is the real approach to solving Baryon Asymmetry.

With -1 AND +1 existing, we could of cause have a type of annihilation. BUT a further "decay" of each dimensionality would do this:

-1 -> -3 +2 AND (+1 -> 0 +1 then +1 -> +2 -1)

Giving us -3, 2, AND 2, -1.

We'd have an asymmetry with two distinct spaces. One made of -3+2 dimensionality and another of +2-1 dimensionality.

I.e. one overall -1 the other overall +1. But geometrically unable to annihilate.

Not getting sidetracked from your question, but this highlights why the sequence might be foundational and special.

The other point re- numbers obtained from measurement. I'd say they are cumulative just as we know them.

For example, the geometries arising from my theory are quantised yet real numbers, as angles such as the dihedral angle of the tetrahedron and Pi apply.

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Aug. 30, 2013 @ 09:36 GMT
DEAR READER,

I have a prediction based on the essay's simplex geometry. A ratio 0.996822341 ought to be seen somewhere in nature. I'm also working on a test to rediscover this exact figure with regard to Baryons.

This figure has already been used to relate the Electron, Proton and Neutron masses to 99.999988% of expected. It is easily derived from simplex geometry and Pi.

Best wishes,

Antony




Author Antony Ryan wrote on Sep. 15, 2013 @ 01:40 GMT
Shame the conversations have stopped. Enjoyable process. If there are any further questions on my essay, please do post and I'll try to get back to you as soon as possible!

Best wishes,

Antony



Hon Jia Koh replied on Dec. 29, 2013 @ 03:13 GMT
Hi Antony,

In case you are interested, just posted an update in my thread or go here

Cheers,

Hon Jia

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Johnny Cash wrote on Oct. 5, 2017 @ 08:57 GMT
I have a prediction based on the essay's simplex geometry. A ratio 0.996822341 ought to be seen somewhere in nature. I'm also working on a test to rediscover this exact figure with regard to Baryons. run 4 game.

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